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Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
Data meeting
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Data meeting

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  • 1. Using Basic Statistics to Look at Your Data { Data Coach Meeting: January 2014
  • 2. How did my class do?
  • 3. Mean or Median? If you want a “helicopter view” of how your class did on a test: • Use “median” in eschool if you are looking at less than 30 data points. • Use “mean” in eschool if you have 30 data points or more.
  • 4. Using the Mean If You Have More Than 1 Class You can combine means using this simple formula: (Class 1 Mean) (# of class 1 students) + (Class 2 Mean)(# of class 2 students) (# of students in both classes)
  • 5. How reliable is this test?
  • 6. Fact: All Tests Have Errors • When you give your test, eschool will give you the standard deviation. • Most teacher-made tests have a reliability coefficient of .50-.60, so assume .55. • Only well-tested tests (WISC, WJ-III) have upward of .90 reliability.
  • 7. Find the Standard Error of a Test • Standard Error is the distance from a student obtained score and their actual score based on test error. • You can figure out the standard error. Let’s assume the standard deviation was 7, and the reliability was .55 for a teacher-made test.
  • 8. Standard Error of Measurement (SEM) SEM = 11 x the square root of 1-.55 SEM = 11 x the square root of .45 SEM = 11 x .67 SEM = 7.37 *So, if a child scores a 90% on a test, they could have a true score in the range of 83 to 97. You simple add and subtract the SEM from the score they receive.
  • 9. Using SEM in Grading
  • 10. Now that you know SEM… In the previous section, we saw the standard error of measurement (SEM) give us a glimpse of how reliable a fictitious test is. It is not unreasonable to consider the SEM when determining how to use multiple measures in the classroom. The larger the SEM, the more of a need for multiple measures

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