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Power of Proofreading, 2012 ACES
 

Power of Proofreading, 2012 ACES

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The 2012 proofreading presentation from the American Copy Editors Society National Conference. This is the shortened version, without fancy automations.

The 2012 proofreading presentation from the American Copy Editors Society National Conference. This is the shortened version, without fancy automations.

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    Power of Proofreading, 2012 ACES Power of Proofreading, 2012 ACES Presentation Transcript

    • The Power of Proofreading Sherrie Voss Matthews, The University of Texas at San Antonio Sherri Hildebrandt, Consultant John Braun, Vanguard GroupThursday, April 12, 12
    • What is proofreading? It is not editing. It is more detail-oriented. You should give every aspect of a project a closer look, including: • Designspace • Spelling White • Punctuation • All nitpicky details •Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond printThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projectsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work? Promotional materials: Does the pen write?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work? Promotional materials: Does the pen write? Maps: Does this make sense? Are geographical references correct?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work? Promotional materials: Does the pen write? Maps: Does this make sense? Are geographical references correct? Scripts: Does the text make sense to those outside of the organization?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work? Promotional materials: Does the pen write? Maps: Does this make sense? Are geographical references correct? Scripts: Does the text make sense to those outside of the organization? Video: Are transitions even? Does the transcript match the script?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beyond print Many of us are responsible for multiple projects Web: Do the links work? Promotional materials: Does the pen write? Maps: Does this make sense? Are geographical references correct? Scripts: Does the text make sense to those outside of the organization? Video: Are transitions even? Does the transcript match the script? Books: Do the chapters match the table of contents? What about the index?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Watch for grammar I want TWO! Watch for common grammatical mistakes by nonwriters.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Apostrophes confuse nonwritersThursday, April 12, 12
    • Also, commasThursday, April 12, 12
    • Also, homonymsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Know your locationThursday, April 12, 12
    • Know your locationThursday, April 12, 12
    • Know your location Where it really is.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Are your eyes playing tricks on you?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Are your eyes playing tricks on you?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Find a style and use itThursday, April 12, 12
    • Save the dateThursday, April 12, 12
    • Save the dateThursday, April 12, 12
    • Watch for creative art design Even if the earth tilted on its axis, the Tower of the Americas wouldn’t be located on top of the Alamodome. But that’s where the art director placed it.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Watch bad juxtapositionsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Or just watch the designThursday, April 12, 12
    • Or just watch the designThursday, April 12, 12
    • Check final proofs for hardreturns or text flowing improperlyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Check final proofs for hardreturns or text flowing improperlyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Check final proofs for hardreturns or text flowing improperlyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Use logic while proofingThursday, April 12, 12
    • Use logic while proofingThursday, April 12, 12
    • Duh.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Invasion of weird cropsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Invasion of weird cropsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Invasion of weird cropsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Invasion of weird cropsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math • Math intimidates editors — but chances are it already intimidated the writer. • Learn a little about the math involved in your job. • Everybody: Percentages. •standings. Sports: Baseball magic numbers, games back in the • Business: Compound interest.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math Compound interest at a glance The formula looks complicated … Future value = Present value times (1 + interest rate) raised to the power of the number of years or FV = PV(1 + i)n ... But really there are just two scenarios to worry about: changing the investment and changing time.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math Compound interest at a glance If you change the amount you invest: FV = PV(1 + i)n … then (1 + i)n is just a number. So we have FV = PV (some number)Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math Compound interest at a glance FV = PV (some number) These two numbers move together. For example, if one doubles, the other doubles too.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math Compound interest at a glance If you change the time you invest … FV = PV(1 + i) n … then future value changes exponentially. If you double the length of time you invest, future value more than doubles.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Do the math Compound interest at a glance It boils down to: Am I changing the money? The yield increases proportionally. Am I changing time? The yield increases more than proportionally.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it right Compounding can make a difference when you save over the long term. For example, a $1,000 investment, growing at an average rate of 8% per year, could compound to $1,469 in five years and $2,159 in ten years! Lots of numbers, but what are we changing? … could compound to $1,469 in five years and $2,159 in ten years!Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it right Compounding can make a difference when you save over the long term. For example, a $1,000 investment, growing at an average rate of 8% per year, could compound to $1,469 in five years and $2,159 in ten years! Lots of numbers, but what are we changing? Time! … could compound to $1,469 in five years and $2,159 in ten years!Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it right Compounding can make a difference when you save over the long term. For example, a $1,000 investment, growing at an average rate of 8% per year, could compound to $1,469 in five years and $2,159 in ten years! • Change in first five years: $1,469 - $1,000 = $469. • Change in next five years: $2,159 - $1,469 = $690. Time makes things grow faster than you’d expect. Double the time and the amount more than doubles.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it wrong Let’s look at Jim and Joe, both of whom earn $25,000. • Jim contributes 3% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 2% for a total contribution of 5%. Over 20 years Jim would accumulate close to $100,000. • Joe contributes 6% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 3.5% for a total contribution of 9.5%. Over 20 years Joe would accumulate about $150,000. This hypothetical example assumes a return of 8% and does not represent the return on any particular investment. What changes? The contribution.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it wrong Let’s look at Jim and Joe, both of whom earn $25,000. • Jim contributes 3% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 2% for a total contribution of 5%. Over 20 years Jim would accumulate close to $100,000. • Joe contributes 6% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 3.5% for a total contribution of 9.5%. Over 20 years Joe would accumulate about $150,000. Joe’s contributing almost twice as much as Jim, but ends up with only 50% more money. No fair!Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Sometimes we get it wrong Let’s look at Jim and Joe, both of whom earn $25,000. • Jim contributes 3% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 2% for a total contribution of 5%. Over 20 years Jim would accumulate close to $100,000. • Joe contributes 6% to the plan and receives a company contribution of 3.5% for a total contribution of 9.5%. Over 20 years Joe would accumulate about $150,000. Joe’s contributing almost twice as much as Jim, but ends up with only 50% more money. No fair! The real numbers should be $60,000 and $110,000.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • And now, the bonus round Chris, age 30, earns $40,000 a year and hopes to retire at age 65. He is contributing 4% and has a balance of $50,000 in his plan account. He is invested conservatively, so his portfolio earns about 5% a year. Saving 4%, plus getting a 4% match from his employer, Chris will have about $259,300 total, or $10,370 a year to spend in retirement. Not quite what he needs. Chris decides to increase his contribution rate by two percentage points for a total of 6% to get the full company match of 6%. With this boost, he will have $870,100 total, or $34,810 annually for his retirement expenses. That’s $610,800 more when he retires, and $24,440 a year more to spend. Lots of numbers again, but what’s changing here?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • And now, the bonus round Chris, age 30, earns $40,000 a year and hopes to retire at age 65. He is contributing 4% and has a balance of $50,000 in his plan account. He is invested conservatively, so his portfolio earns about 5% a year. Saving 4%, plus getting a 4% match from his employer, Chris will have about $259,300 total, or $10,370 a year to spend in retirement. Not quite what he needs. Chris decides to increase his contribution rate by two percentage points for a total of 6% to get the full company match of 6%. With this boost, he will have $870,100 total, or $34,810 annually for his retirement expenses. That’s $610,800 more when he retires, and $24,440 a year more to spend.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • And now, the bonus round Chris, age 30, earns $40,000 a year and hopes to retire at age 65. He is contributing 4% and has a balance of $50,000 in his plan account. He is invested conservatively, so his portfolio earns about 5% a year. Saving 4%, plus getting a 4% match from his employer, Chris will have about $259,300 total, or $10,370 a year to spend in retirement. Not quite what he needs. Chris decides to increase his contribution rate by two percentage points for a total of 6% to get the full company match of 6%. With this boost, he will have $870,100 total, or $34,810 annually for his retirement expenses. That’s $610,800 more when he retires, and $24,440 a year more to spend. The contribution rate from 4% + 4% = 8% to 6% + 6% = 12%.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • And now, the bonus round Chris, age 30, earns $40,000 a year and hopes to retire at age 65. He is contributing 4% and has a balance of $50,000 in his plan account. He is invested conservatively, so his portfolio earns about 5% a year. Saving 4%, plus getting a 4% match from his employer, Chris will have about $259,300 total, or $10,370 a year to spend in retirement. Not quite what he needs. Chris decides to increase his contribution rate by two percentage points for a total of 6% to get the full company match of 6%. With this boost, he will have $870,100 total, or $34,810 annually for his retirement expenses. That’s $610,800 more when he retires, and $24,440 a year more to spend.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • And now, the bonus round Chris, age 30, earns $40,000 a year and hopes to retire at age 65. He is contributing 4% and has a balance of $50,000 in his plan account. He is invested conservatively, so his portfolio earns about 5% a year. Saving 4%, plus getting a 4% match from his employer, Chris will have about $259,300 total, or $10,370 a year to spend in retirement. Not quite what he needs. Chris decides to increase his contribution rate by two percentage points for a total of 6% to get the full company match of 6%. With this boost, he will have $870,100 total, or $34,810 annually for his retirement expenses. That’s $610,800 more when he retires, and $24,440 a year more to spend. Putting in 12% of his pay instead of 8% should raise his output by 50%. Instead he’s more than tripled his money!Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the rushThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the rushThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the dummy textThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the dummy textThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the dummy textThursday, April 12, 12
    • Thursday, April 12, 12 >rq) o: %E r- 8t< A LJ EEwE. ffi o !t es bU g-dE6 do o5 ri5 Gl !o= r- o. o ts aJ At 3tt $ G a.^5* 5iD (D (D oh JE et) F:ii (Da vQ ^ts i= e $ (Dtr =cn E:: so s.. ES f): -- !! Y- ;+ E tDg F9 (h FIQ c: GO q- ffi re O d5(D q b9. Ed s bu o <o) Fr ^1 F#E oq -{ ?.) .S @ cd ct> (D ! sl-io w M E Co oF =E i! : -FD oq I9.x E (D -o ;+o G -t o - FD H- o 93; o-- ) o o (DH o:. a* s) E. st. @ ffi@ -{ 5u) lrX I+ dDE. -(D s . t ffi ,) Fgo o!l -.oa sh sl ctq (D o:o n (.) r3 -N <. G) ( v) ffiffi M -) Ld , e.+ E oP o o-f QH o 5= 4^. st ++ A; | 60. g -x 9! G s)U HH )@ <at Sr G -s % ffi Fdo ffi ffit{ W o= ffi ffireu=qre l-) t.lU, H. ffiw ob %w cne t - ffi lt ;JH riCD ( -J 6@ t+{ !F ; r/ v;? l- .< ( Fi (D !e -u) l E3 da. l ()o H F -.i::Sdl:i l".iri ( ( ( Beware proofing in a hurry
    • Beware the typoThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the typoThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the typoThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware the typoThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware proofing in a hurryThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware proofing in a hurryThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware proofing in a hurryThursday, April 12, 12
    • Know what is in the document “A designer handling sports pages one night last week caught a big problem on A1 when the papers came up: “A designertwo flag keys, a big oneone night 70 week One of the handling sports pages covering last caught of the width of the page, touted a story in percenta big problem on A1 when the papers came up: Sportsthe twothe removal of trees from the outfield at One of about flag keys, a big one covering 70 Target Field. percent of the width of the page, touted a story in Sports about the removal of trees from the outfield at Target Field. “Problem was: Sports didnt have room for the story and didnt run it. “Problem was: Sports didnt have room for the story and didnt run it. caught the error in the slotting and “We should have proofing, but going 100 mph we missed it.” “We should have caught the error in the slotting and proofing, but going -100 mph we missed it.” Star Tribune Ben Welter, copy desk chief, - Ben Welter, copy desk chief, Star TribuneThursday, April 12, 12
    • Great adviceThursday, April 12, 12
    • Beware being overly cleverThursday, April 12, 12
    • Triple-check. Everything.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Triple-check. Everything.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boy Which of these is not like the others? Which of these does not belong?Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boyThursday, April 12, 12
    • Think like a 12-year-old boy Healthy Foods, The interdisciplinary arena of food, nutrition, Healthy Lives and health research and outreach is a key initiative at the University of Minnesota. With six key components on one campus—agriculture, human nutrition, medicine, pubic health, exercise science, and veterinary medicine—interdisciplinary cooperation can translate quality science to sound public policy. BerriesThursday, April 12, 12 and at the Horticultural Research Center near
    • Is this what music has come to? Indie folk singer Haley Bonar already has recorded songs for her next album, “Golder,” but needs money to cover the cost of touring as she promotes tit.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Is this what music has come to? Indie folk singer Haley Bonar already has recorded songs for her next album, “Golder,” but needs money to cover the cost of touring as she promotes tit.Thursday, April 12, 12
    • AP? CMS? APA? What’s your style? Luverne CHIT CHAT’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 920 South Kniss Ave. Luverne, Minnesota 56156 507-283-4458 Located one-half blocks north of Interstate Highway 90 in LuverneThursday, April 12, 12
    • Find a style; be consistent Luverne CHIT CHAT’S FAMILY RESTAURANT 920 S. Kniss Avenue Luverne, MN 56156 507-283-4458 Half a block north of Interstate 90 in LuverneThursday, April 12, 12
    • Time-honored tips  Take nothing for granted  Designers and writers can miss the obvious as well as the subtle  Don’t trust Word’s spellcheck and grammar functions. Ever.  Pay attention when referring to all of your document  Don’t embarrass your publication (or your sources)  Have a sense of styleThursday, April 12, 12
    • Time-honored tips  Pressroom guys & coworkers have eyes - use them as resources  Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty  Read in reverse  Know your weaknesses - find your personal experts  Listen to that little voice in your head  The devil really is in the detailsThursday, April 12, 12
    • Save your sanity ApostropheAbuse.com or Like them on Facebook For Every Time You Misuse an Apostrophe, I’m Going to Remove a Finger - Like them on FacebookThursday, April 12, 12
    • Thursday, April 12, 12
    • Many thanks to our proofing peeps Special thanks to Charles Apple, James Benavides, John Braun, Kirsten Efird, Lynn Gosnell, Sherri Hildebrandt, Laura Johnson, Gina Lamb, Greg Matthews, Lesley McCreedy, Melody Sanders, Sherrie Voss Matthews, Gawker Media and The Huffington Post for their sharp eyes and blooper contributions.Thursday, April 12, 12