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  • College/University campuses are complex social systems. They are defined by the relationships between faculty, staff, students, and alumni; bureaucratic procedures embodied by institutional policies; structural frameworks; institutional missions, visions, and core values; institutional history and traditions; and larger social contexts.
  • Climate on college campuses not only affects the creation of knowledge, but also has a significant impact on members of the academic community who, in turn, contribute to the creation of the campus environment.

Campus climatesurveyresults Campus climatesurveyresults Presentation Transcript

  • UW-Eau Claire Campus Climate Assessment Results of Report April 27, 2010
  • Campuses as Social Systems Students, Faculty, Staff, Alumni Institutional Social Contexts Policies Structural Vision/Mission Framework Institutional History/Core Values Hurtado, Milem, Clayton-Pederson, & Allen, 1998
  • Climate In Higher Education Community Members Creation and Distribution of Knowledge Climate (Living, Working, Learning) Barcelo, 2004; Bauer, 1998, Kuh & Whitt, 1998; Hurtado, 1998, 2005; Ingle, 2005; Milhem, 2005; Peterson, 1990; Rankin, 1994, 1998, 2003, 2005; Smith, 1999; Tierney, 1990; Worthington, 2008
  • Assessing Campus Climate • Campus Climate is a construct What is it? • Current attitudes, behaviors, and standards and practices of employees and students of an Definition? institution • Personal Experiences • Perceptions How is it measured? • Institutional Efforts Rankin & Reason, 2008
  • Campus Climate & Students How students Discriminatory Research supports the experience their environments have a pedagogical value of campus environment negative effect on a diverse student influences both student learning.2 body and faculty on learning and enhancing learning developmental outcomes.3 outcomes.1 1 Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991, 2005 2 Cabrera, Nora, Terenzini, Pascarella, & Hagedron, 1999; Feagin, Vera & Imani, 1996; Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991. 3 Hale, 2004; Harper & Quaye , 2004; Harper, & Hurtado, 2007; Hurtado, 2003.
  • Why conduct a climate assessment? To foster a caring University community that provides leadership for constructive participation in a diverse, multicultural world. To open the doors wider for underrepresented groups is to create a welcoming environment. To improve the environment for working and learning on campus.
  • Project Objectives Provide UW-Eau Claire with information, analysis, and recommendations as they relate to campus climate. This information will be used in conjunction with other data to provide UW-Eau Claire with an inclusive view of campus and a system-wide review.
  • Projected Outcomes UW-Eau Claire will add to their knowledge base with regard to how constituent groups currently feel about their particular campus climate and how the community responds to them (e.g., pedagogy, curricular issues, professional development, inter- group/intra-group relations, respect issues). UW Eau-Claire will use the results of the assessment to inform current/on-going work regarding diversity (e.g., Inclusive Excellence, Equity Scorecard).
  • Setting the Context Examine the Research  Review work already completed Preparation  Readiness of the campus Assessment  Examine the climate Follow-up  Building on the successes and addressing the challenges
  • Access Transformational Tapestry Model© Retention Assessment Research University Baseline Local / Sate / Policies/Service Scholarship Systems Organizational Regional Current Analysis Challenges Environments Campus Climate Contextualized Campus Wide Assessment Advanced Curriculum Intergroup & Consultant Organizational Pedagogy Intragroup Recommendations Challenges Relations External Relations Access Retention Symbolic Actions Research University Policies/Service Scholarship Transformed Transformation Fiscal Campus Educational via Actions Climate Actions Intervention Curriculum Intergroup & Administrative Pedagogy Intragroup Actions Relations External Relations © 2001
  • University of Wisconsin System Mission The mission of the system is to develop human resources, to discover and disseminate knowledge, to extend knowledge and its application beyond the boundaries of its campuses and to serve and stimulate society by developing in students heightened intellectual, cultural and humane sensitivities, scientific, professional and technological expertise and a sense of purpose. Inherent in this broad mission are methods of instruction, research, extended training and public service designed to educate people and improve the human condition. Basic to every purpose of the system is the search for truth.
  • Core Mission of the University Cluster …“Serve the needs of women, minority, disadvantaged, disabled, and nontraditional students and seek racial and ethnic diversification of the student body and the professional faculty and staff.”
  • Process to Date 2004-2005 Academic Planner (C. Saulnier) made aware of bias incidents at several campuses & began conversation regarding system-wide campus climate project Taskforce committee formed to investigate consulting firms who conduct climate assessments in higher education. Rankin & Associates identified as leading expert in multiple identity studies in higher education
  • Process to Date 2005-2006 Conversations at system level continued Proposal presentation made to UW System Provosts and various constituent groups in Madison in September 2006
  • Process to Date 2006-2007 UWS Administrators form Climate Study Working Group (CSWG)  Conducted in-depth interviews with other higher education institutions who had contracted with R&A resulting in very positive reviews  In collaboration with R&A identified potential fact- finding groups and developed protocol  Identified “next steps” in process
  • Process to Date 2006-2007 President Reilly pledges support for the project and agrees to finance 75% of the costs Five campuses volunteer to participate in climate assessment in the first year Participating institutions Provosts’ Teleconference with R&A to discuss process, Scope of the Work, Projected Time-line, Proposed Budget At the request of R&A, the Provosts were invited to add additional members to the CSWG to ensure institutional representation
  • Process to Date 2006-2007 Project Co-Chairs and Project Coordinator named  Vicki Washington (Co-Chair, CSWG) Interim Assistant Vice President of the Office of Academic Development and Diversity, UW System Administration  Ed Burgess (Co-Chair, CSWG) Department of Dance, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  Lisa Beckstrand (Project Coordinator) Academic Planner, Director of Inclusivity Initiative, Office of Academic & Student Services, UW System Administration
  • Process to Date Participating Institutions Spring 2008 Fall 2009 UW Colleges UW-Eau Claire UW-La Crosse UW-Parkside UW-Milwaukee UW-River Falls UW-Oshkosh UW-Whitewater UW-Stevens Point
  • Overview of the Project Phase I • Fact-Finding Groups Phase II • Assessment Tool Development and Implementation Phase III • Data Analysis Phase IV • Final Report and Presentation
  • Phase I Process to Date September 2007 Fact-finding groups were held with UW System students, staff, and faculty from various constituent groups to discuss their perceptions of the college climate. Information from the fact finding Groups used by CSWG to identify baseline system-wide and institutional challenges and to assist in developing survey questions.
  • Phase II Process to Date August 2007 - February 2008 Bi-monthly meetings with CSWG to develop the survey instrument Development of Communication Plan CSWG developed the final survey instrument template that was administered to the five participating institutions in spring 2008.
  • Phase II cont’d Process to Date Summer and Fall 2009 Diversity Leadership Committee (DLC) at UW-Eau Claire revised the survey to better match the campus context at UW-Eau Claire. Approved by UW-Eau Claire Institutional Review Board (IRB) in September 2009. The survey was distributed in October 2009.
  • Survey Instrument Final instrument  91 questions and additional space for respondents to provide commentary  On-line or paper & pencil options Sample = Population  All members of the UW-Eau Claire community were invited to participate Results include information regarding:  Respondents’ personal experiences at UW-Eau Claire  Respondents’ perceptions of climate at UW-Eau Claire  Respondents’ perceptions of institutional actions  Respondents’ input into recommendations for change
  • Survey Assessment Limitations Self-selection bias Response rates Caution in generalizing results for constituent groups with significantly lower response rates
  • Method Limitation Data were not reported for groups of fewer than 10 individuals where identity could be compromised. Instead, small groups were combined to eliminate possibility of identifying individuals.
  • Phase III Process to Date January – March 2010 Quantitative and qualitative analyses conducted by Rankin & Associates.
  • Phase Process IV to Date April 2010 Draft of the report reviewed by DLC committee members. Final report forwarded to DLC representatives. Presentation of survey results to the campus community.
  • Results Response Rates
  • Who are the respondents?  4,607 people responded to the call to participate (37% response rate overall).  Several respondents contributed remarks to the open-ended questions.
  • Faculty Response Rates Assistant Professor (55%, n = 63) Associate Professor (54%, n = 67) Professor (51%, n = 67) Instructional Academic Staff (33%, n = 61) Adjunct Faculty (n = 9)
  • Staff Response Rates Classified Staff Exempt (56%, n = 50) Non-Instructional Academic Staff (49%, n = 95) Classified Staff Non-Exempt (27%, n = 88) Limited Academic Staff (24%, n = 7) Limited Term Employee (19%, n = 28) Administrators (n = 30)
  • Student Response Rates Bachelor Degree Student (33%, n = 3401) Master Degree Student (17%, n = 82) Transfer (n = 229) Associate Degree (n = 139) Non-Degree Seeking (n = 59) Professional Degree (n = 32) Dual Enrollment (n = 2) Doctoral Degree Student (n = 8)
  • Student Response Rates by Selected Demographics By By Race Gender Students of Color Women Students 29% (n = 276) 41% (n = 2635) White Students Men Students % 37% (n = 3676) 28% (n = 1294)
  • Results Demographic Characteristics
  • Student Respondents by Class Standing (n) First year 2nd yr 3rd yr 1091 4th yr 919 5th yr or more Master's degree 700 758 Doctoral degree Professional degree 392 47 1 2 Students
  • Student Residence 8% of student respondents lived with 53% of student 38% of student partner, spouse, children, parents, family or relatives respondents respondents lived in lived in off- residence halls campus apartment or house
  • Income by Student Status (n) Undergraduate Dependent 995 Undergraduate Independent Graduate students 546 499 494 313 178 139 95 21 30 32 21 18 14 15
  • Employee Respondents by Position Status (n) Adjunt professor Instructional academic staff Assistant professor Associate professor Professor Limited term employee Classified staff non-exempt Classified staff exempt Non-instructional academic staff Limited academic staff Administrator 88 95 90 Other 63 67 67 61 50 28 30 9 7
  • Collapsed Employee Status (n) Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff 267 160 138
  • Respondents by Gender and Position Status (n) 2551 Undergraduate Students Graduate Students Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff 1258 84 156 105 95 108 36 53 43 Female Male There were 10 respondents who identified as transgender (8 students; 2 employees)
  • Respondents by Sexual Orientation and Position Status (n) Students 3710 Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff 245 140 129 164 18 15 7 Heterosexual LGB
  • Respondents by Racial Identity (n) (Unduplicated Total) 3626 276 People of Color White People
  • Respondents by Faculty/Staff Appointments by Gender Women Men n % n % Adjunct professor 6 1.7 2 1.0 Instructional Academic Staff 45 12.6 16 7.8 Assistant professor 47 13.2 16 7.8 Associate professor 31 8.7 35 17.2 Professor 27 7.6 39 19.1 Limited Term employee 22 6.2 5 2.5 Classified staff non-exempt 67 18.8 21 10.3 Classified staff exempt staff 28 7.9 22 13.7 Non-instructional academic staff 66 18.5 28 13.7 Limited academic staff 5 1.4 2 1.0 Administrator 12 3.4 18 8.8
  • Respondents by Spiritual Affiliation (n) 3110 Christian Other than Christian No Affiliation Other 931 456 80
  • Respondents with Conditions that Substantially Affect Major Life Activities (n) Physical Disability 72 Learning Disability Psychological Condition 63 34 6 4 4 0 6 0 1 1 2 Students Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff
  • Citizenship Status by Position Students Employees n % n % US citizen 3833 97.1 528 94.5 US citizen – naturalized 28 0.7 8 1.4 Dual citizenship 18 0.5 6 1.1 Permanent resident (immigrant) 14 0.4 15 2.7 International (F-1, J-1, or H1-B, or other visa) 55 1.4 * * * Data is missing due to n < 5
  • Findings
  • Overall Comfort Levels Campus Climate (88%) Department/Work Unit (86%) Classroom (87%)
  • Comfort Levels with Overall Campus Climate, Department/Work Unit Climate, and Class Climate by Demographic Groups Most Comfortable Least Comfortable Heterosexual Men White People LGBQ People of Color
  • Overall Satisfaction • Employees who were “highly satisfied” or “satisfied” with their jobs at UW Eau Claire. 78% • Employees who were “highly satisfied” or “satisfied” with the way their careers have progressed at UW Eau Claire. 65% • Students who were “highly satisfied” or “satisfied” with their 89% education UW Eau Claire. • Students who were “highly satisfied” or “satisfied” with the way their academic careers have progressed at UW Eau Claire. 76%
  • Lowest Levels of Satisfaction by Demographic Groups Satisfaction with • Women and classified staff Job Satisfaction with • Women and classified staff Career Progression Satisfaction with • Students of Color and LGBQ students Education Satisfaction with • LGBQ Students Academic Career Progression
  • Employee Satisfaction with Their Jobs by Selected Demographic Categories (%) Satisfied* Dissatisfied** 84 81 78 80 78 74 14 15 9 10 11 11 Women Men People of Color White LGB Heterosexual * Highly Satisfied and Satisfied collapsed into one category. ** Highly Dissatisfied and Dissatisfied collapsed into one category.
  • Employee Satisfaction with the Way Their Careers Have Progressed by Selected Demographic Categories (%) Satisfied* Dissatisfied** 78 72 61 63 63 64 26 18 17 17 12 5 Women Men People of Color White LGB Heterosexual * Highly Satisfied and Satisfied collapsed into one category. ** Highly Dissatisfied and Dissatisfied collapsed into one category.
  • Employee Satisfaction with the Way Their Careers Have Progressed By Position Status (%) Satisfied* Dissatisfied** 70 64 55 16 16 17 Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff * Highly Satisfied and Satisfied collapsed into one category. ** Highly Dissatisfied and Dissatisfied collapsed into one category.
  • Employee Comments with Regard to Job and Career Progression Satisfaction  Employees who were satisfied with the way their careers have progressed enjoyed their day-to-day work lives, were “passionate” about the content of their jobs, saw advancement as a possibility, worked in pleasant atmospheres/departments, were happy to have a full time job, and felt supported by their superiors.  Those employees who were not satisfied with their career progression felt “stuck” in their jobs, saw no possibility for advancement, received low salaries, were disparaged or discouraged by their supervisors, and felt that they were “overworked”.
  • Student Satisfaction with Education at UW Eau Claire (%) Satisfied* Dissatisfied** 91 90 89 86 81 82 11 2 4 4 2 2 Women Men People of Color White LGB Heterosexual * Highly Satisfied and Satisfied collapsed into one category. ** Highly Dissatisfied and Dissatisfied collapsed into one category.
  • Student Satisfaction with Academic Career at UW Eau Claire (%) Satisfied* Dissatisfied** 78 76 77 72 71 68 11 7 9 10 7 7 Women Men People of Color White LGB Heterosexual * Highly Satisfied and Satisfied collapsed into one category. ** Highly Dissatisfied and Dissatisfied collapsed into one category.
  • Student Comments with Regard to Satisfaction with Academic Experiences  Students who were satisfied with the way their academic careers have progressed said they had informative academic advisors, had good relationships with “excellent teachers,” UW-Eau Claire has met their expectations, and they were earning “good grades.”  Dissatisfied students said that some coursework was “unnecessary” or “redundant,” their academic advisors “could be better,” they were not able to enroll in required courses, the coursework was not challenging enough, the coursework was too difficult, they had difficulty adjusting to college life, and they were not certain which major to choose.
  • Challenges and Opportunities
  • Experiences with Harassment 508 respondents indicated that they had personally experienced exclusionary, intimidating, offens 11% ive and/or hostile conduct that interfered with their ability to work or learn at UW-Eau Claire
  • Personally Experienced Based on…(%) Gender (n=133) Age (n=116) Institutional Status (n=90) Religion/Spiritual Status (n=82) 26 Political Views (n=73) Physical Characteristics (n=68) 23 Educational Level (n=66) Race (n=45) 18 Ethnicity (n=43) 16 Sexual Orientation (n=39) 14 13 13 9 9 8
  • Overall Personal Experiences of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct Due to Gender by Gender (%) Overall experienced conduct¹ Experienced conduct due to gender² 33 20 11 11 11 0 Women Men Transgender (n=338)¹ (n=162)¹ (n=2)¹ (n=113)² (n=17)² (n=0)² ¹ Percentages are based on total n split by group. ² Percentages are based on n split by group for those who believed they had personally experienced this conduct.
  • Overall Personal Experiences of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct by Position Status (%) Overall experienced conduct¹ Experienced conduct due to status² 52 44 39 30 23 20 9 8 Students Faculty Academic Staff Classified Staff (n=351)¹ (n=79)¹ (n=32)¹ (n=31)¹ (n=27)² (n=31)² (n=14)² (n=16)² ¹ Percentages are based on total n split by group. ² Percentages are based on n split by group for those who believed they had personally experienced this conduct.
  • Overall Personal Experiences of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct Due to Race by Race (%) Overall experienced conduct¹ Experienced conduct due to race² 55 20 10 2 People of Color White (n=66)¹ (n=427)¹ (n=36)² (n=7)² ¹ Percentages are based on total n split by group. ² Percentages are based on n split by group for those who believed they had personally experienced this conduct.
  • Overall Personal Experiences of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct by Sexual Orientation due to Sexual Orientation (%) Overall experienced conduct¹ 61 Experienced conduct due to sexual orientation² 24 10 2 LGB respondents Heterosexual respondents (n=49)¹ (n=435)¹ (n=30)² (n=7)² ¹ Percentages are based on total n split by group. ² Percentages are based on n split by group for those who believed they had personally experienced this conduct.
  • Overall Personal Experiences of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct Due to Disability Status by Disability Status (%) Overall experienced conduct¹ Experienced conduct due to disability² 62 38 34 25 26 22 10 No disability Physical Disability Learning Disability Psychological Condition (n=16)¹ (n=16)¹ (n=21)¹ (n=455)¹ (n=4)² (n=6)² (n=13)² ¹ Percentages are based on total n split by group. ² Percentages are based on n split by group for those who believed they had personally experienced this conduct.
  • Form of Perceived Offensive, Hostile, or Intimidating Conduct n % Deliberately ignored or excluded 245 48.2 Felt intimidated/bullied 165 32.5 Stares 111 21.9 Derogatory remarks 93 18.3 Isolated or left out when working in groups 88 17.3 Isolated or left out because of my identity 64 12.6 Received a low performance evaluation 61 12.0 Derogatory written comments 47 9.3 Feared getting a poor grade because of hostile classroom environment 46 9.1 Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 508. Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Respondents Who Believed They Were Deliberately Ignored or Excluded Where Did The Perceived Conduct Occur? 39 percent (n = 96) - in a class 34 percent (n = 82) - in a meeting with a group of people Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 381). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Respondents Who Believed They Were Intimidated or Bullied Where Did The Perceived Conduct Occur? 32 percent (n = 52) - in a class 21 percent (n = 35) - in a meeting with a group of people 21 percent (n = 35) - at a campus job Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 381). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Source of Perceived Conduct by Position Status (n) 162 Source = Undergraduate Source = Faculty Source = Administrator Source = Staff 115 Source = Supervisor 57 33 12 11 17 11 13 11 16 14 16 17 9 6 9 7 2 4 Student Respondents Faculty Respondents Academic Staff Classified Staff Respondents Respondents
  • What did you do? 1 Personal responses:  Was angry (53%)  Told a friend (40%)  Felt embarrassed (40%)  Ignored it (34%)  Avoided the harasser (30%) Reporting responses:  Didn’t know who to go to (16% )  Made a complaint to campus employee/official (13%)  Did not report the incident for fear of retaliation (13%)  Didn’t report it for fear my complaint would not be taken seriously (10%)  Did report it but my complaint was not taken seriously (9%) 1Respondents could mark more than one response
  • Sexual Harassment/Sexual Assault The survey defined sexual harassment as “A repeated course of conduct whereby one person engages in verbal or physical behavior of a sexual nature, that is unwelcome, serves no legitimate purpose, intimidates another person, and has the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or classroom environment.” The survey defined sexual assault as “Intentional physical contact, such as sexual intercourse or touching, of a person’s intimate body parts by someone who did not have permission to make such contact.”
  • Sexual Misconduct at UW-Eau Claire Believed they had been touched in a sexual manner that made 8% them feel uncomfortable or fearful Were fearful of being 4% sexually harassed at UW Eau-Claire
  • Respondents Who Experienced Sexual Assault 88 respondents 2% were victims of sexual assault
  • Respondents Who Believed They Were Sexually Assaulted By Gender By Sexual By Racial By Position Identity Identity Identity • Women • Heterosexual • White • Students (3%; n = 78) (2%; n = 77) People (n = 76) • Men • LGBQQ (2%; n = 81) • Employees (1%; n=7) (3%, n = 7) • People of (n = 4) • Transgender Color (1%, n = 1) (2%, n = 6)
  • Respondents Who Believed They Were Sexually Assaulted Where did it occur? Off-campus (n = 48) Who were the offenders against students?* Students (n = 34) What did you do1? Told a friend (n = 57) Did nothing (n = 24) Told a family member (n = 18) 1Respondents could mark more than one response
  • Respondents Who Seriously Considered Leaving UW-Eau Claire 36% (n = 1672) of all Respondents ----------------------------------------------- Students (34%); Faculty (56%); Academic Staff (61%); Classified Staff (49%)
  • Employee Respondents Who Seriously Considered Leaving UW-Eau Claire Employees: Women (55%); Men (59%) Employees of Color (46%); White Employees (58%) LGBQ Employees (65%); Heterosexual Employees (57%)
  • Student Respondents Who Seriously Considered Leaving UW-Eau Claire Students: Women (34%); Men (34%) Students of Color (36%); White Students (33%) LGBQ Students (48%); Heterosexual Students (33%)
  • Perceptions
  • Employees Who Observed or Were Personally Made Aware of Conduct That Created an Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive and/or Hostile Working or Learning Environment % n Yes 19.0 861
  • Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct by Race (%) White People (n=759) People of Color (n=86) 26 18
  • Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct by Gender (%) Women (n=564) Men (n=289) 19 19
  • Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct by Sexual Orientation (%) LGB (n=79) Heterosexual (n=761) 38 18
  • Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct by Position Status (%)
  • Form of Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct n % Stares 359 41.7 Derogatory remarks 340 39.5 Deliberately ignored or excluded 309 35.8 Racial/ethnic profiling 252 29.3 Someone isolated or left out because of their identity 197 22.9 Intimidation/bullying 161 18.7 Assumption that someone was admitted or hired because of their identity 153 17.8 Graffiti 150 17.4 Derogatory written comments 142 16.5 Someone isolated or left out when working in groups 99 11.5 Note: Only answered by respondents who observed harassment (n = 861). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Form of Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct n % Someone singled out as the “resident authority” regarding their identity 85 9.9 Threats of physical violence 56 6.5 Someone receiving a low performance evaluation 56 6.5 Someone fearing for their physical safety 55 6.4 Someone isolated or left out because of their socioeconomic status 53 6.2 Someone receiving a poor grade because of hostile classroom environment 47 5.5 Victim of a crime 31 3.6 Derogatory/unsolicited e-mails 30 3.5 Physical violence 27 3.1 Derogatory phone calls 21 2.4 Someone fearing for their family’s safety 9 1.0
  • Source of Observed Exclusionary, Intimidating, Offensive, or Hostile Conduct (%)  Students (54%)  Didn’t Know the Source (22%)  Faculty Members (14%)  Colleagues (11%) Note: Only answered by respondents who observed harassment (n = 861). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Respondents Who Observed People Being Stared At Where Did The Perceived Conduct Occur? 63 percent (n = 227) - while walking on campus 47 percent (n = 167) - in a public space on campus 43 percent (n = 155) - in a class Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 861). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Respondents Who Observed Others as Targets of Derogatory Remarks Where Did The Perceived Conduct Occur? 35 percent (n = 119) - while walking on campus 34 percent (n = 114) - in a public space on campus Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 861). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Respondents Who Observed Someone Being Deliberately Ignored or Excluded Where Did The Perceived Conduct Occur? 43 percent (n = 132) - in a class 23 percent (n = 72) - in a public space on campus Note: Only answered by respondents who experienced harassment (n = 861). Percentages do not sum to 100 due to multiple responses.
  • Perceived Discrimination Employment Employment Hiring Practices Related to Practices Excluding (27%) Promotion/Tenure Promotion/Tenure (10%) (24%) Due to Gender Due to Gender Due to Gender (27%) (24%) (34%) Due to Race Due to Position Due to Position (17%) (20%) (19%) Due to Ethnicity Due to Age Due to Age (17%) (11%) (10%)
  • Work-Life Issues The majority of respondents expressed positive attitudes about work-life issues.
  • Work-Life Issues 76% (n = 435) of employee respondents were comfortable asking questions about performance expectations 37% (n = 210) believe there are many unwritten rules concerning how one is expected to interact with colleagues in their work units 27% (n = 154) were reluctant to bring up issues that concern them for fear than it will affect their performance evaluation or tenure decision 71% (n = 405) believed that they had colleagues or peers who gave them career advice or guidance when they need it
  • Work-Life Issues 63% (n = 357) believed that they had support from decision makers/colleagues who supported their career advancement 50% (n = 134) of faculty thought their research interests were valued by their colleagues 23% (n = 131) constantly felt under the scrutiny by their colleagues 28% (n = 161) felt they had to work harder than their colleagues do in order to be perceived as legitimate 40% (n = 228) thought their compensation was equitable to their peers with similar levels of experience
  • Work-Life Issues 62% (n = 357) of employees are usually satisfied with the way in which they were able to balance their professional and personal lives 39% (n = 221) found UW-Eau Claire supportive of family leave 40% (n = 230) have had to miss out on important things in their personal lives because of professional responsibilities 18% (n = 88) felt that employees who have children were considered less committed to their careers 21% (n = 118) felt that employees who do not have children were often burdened with work responsibilities
  • Work-Life Issues 15% (n = 84) believed the institution was unfair in providing health benefits to unmarried, co-parenting partners 26% (n = 140) thought they had equitable access to domestic partner benefits 18% (n = 96) believed they had equitable access to tuition reimbursement
  • Welcoming Workplace Climate  More than half of all employees thought the workplace climate was welcoming of “difference.”  Exceptions include: mental health status, gender expression, learning disability status, and political views.  Respondents of Color and sexual minority respondents were least likely to believe the workplace climate was welcoming.
  • Welcoming Classroom Climate More than half of all student respondents felt that the classroom climate was welcoming for students based on “difference” across all dimensions. 56% of Students of Color and 73% of White students thought the classroom climate was welcoming based on race 44% of LGB students and 64% of heterosexual students thought the climate was welcoming based on sexual orientation
  • Institutional Actions
  • Visible Leadership More than half of the respondents “strongly agreed” or “agreed” that the Chancellor, department chairs, Multicultural Affairs, the Admissions Office and Advising provided visible leadership that fosters inclusion of diverse members of the campus community. Substantial percentages of respondents were unaware of the degree to which many of the other offices, units, committees, and groups provided visible leadership.
  • Inclusive Curriculum More than half of all students and faculty felt the courses they took or taught included materials, perspectives, and/or experiences of people based on “difference.” The exceptions included mental health status, learning disability, physical disability, and veteran/active military status.
  • Campus Initiatives That Would Positively Affect the Climate  More than half of all employee respondents recommended:  providing tenure clock options with more flexibility for promotion and tenure for faculty/staff with families would positively affect the climate  training mentors and leaders within departments to model positive climate behavior  offering diversity training/programs as community outreach would positively affect the climate
  • Campus Initiatives That Would Positively Affect the Climate  More than half of all employee respondents recommended:  providing, improving, and promoting access to quality services for those individuals who experience sexual abuse  providing mentors for minority faculty/students/staff new to campus  providing a clear protocol for responding to hate/hostile incidents at the campus level and departmental level  providing on-campus child care services  providing gender neutral/family friendly facilities
  • Campus Initiatives That Would Positively Affect the Climate  Less than half of all employee respondents recommended:  providing recognition and rewards for including diversity in course objectives throughout the curriculum  rewarding research efforts that evaluate outcomes of diversity training  diversity related activities as one of the criteria for hiring and/or evaluation of staff, faculty, and administrators  reallocating resources to support inclusive climate changes on campus  requiring the Affirmative Action Office to provide diversity and equity training to every search and screen committee
  • Summary Strengths and Successes Challenges and Opportunities
  • Summary of Findings Strengths and Successes  89% percent of students were satisfied with their education at UW-Eau Claire.  78% of employees were satisfied with their jobs and 65% with how their careers have progressed.  Over 75% of respondents reported that they were very comfortable or comfortable with the overall climate, climate in their departments or work unit, and climate in their classes.
  • Summary of Findings Opportunities and Challenges Challenge Racial Tension Challenge Gender Inequity Challenge Homophobia and Heterosexism Challenge Differential Treatment Due to Institutional Position
  • Racial Tension at UW-Eau Claire  Twice as many Respondents of Color (20%, n = 66) reported personally experiencing harassment when compared to their White counterparts (10%, n = 427).  Fifty-five percent (n = 36) of Respondents of Color said the harassment was based on their race, while only two percent (n = 7) of White respondents indicated the basis as race.  People of Color were also more likely than White people to observe offensive, hostile, exclusionary, or intimidating conduct.  Of those who observed harassment, 24% (n = 203) believed it was based on race.
  • Racial Tension at UW-Eau Claire  People of Color were less comfortable than White respondents with the overall climate for diversity, the climate in their departments/work units, and the climate in their classes, with the largest difference in the classroom.  Employees of Color were more likely than White employees to report:  they were reluctant to bring up issues that concern them for fear that it will affect their performance evaluation or tenure decision  colleagues expect them to represent “the point of view” of their identity  their colleagues have lower expectations of them than of other employees  that they have to work harder than their colleagues do in order to be perceived as legitimate.  Employees of Color were also more likely to believe they had observed discriminatory hiring practices, employment-related disciplinary actions, and discriminatory practices related to promotion.
  • Gender Inequity According to all respondents who experienced harassment, the conduct was most often based on gender. Women were three times (33%, n = 113) more likely than men (11%, n = 17) to indicate the basis of harassment as gender. Women respondents were also less satisfied with their jobs and the way their careers have progressed when compared with men. This theme did not extend to students such that men student respondents were less satisfied with both their jobs and academic career progression.
  • Gender Inequity Of those respondents who believed that they had observed discriminatory hiring, 27% (n = 42) said it was based on gender. Of those individuals who believed that they had observed discriminatory employment-related disciplinary actions, 24% (n = 13) said it was based on gender. Of those individuals who observed discriminatory practices related to promotion, 34%, (n = 46) said it was based on gender. In all three instances, gender was the most cited basis for discrimination.
  • Gender Inequity Women faculty were less likely than men faculty to feel their research interests were valued by their colleagues. Women employees were more reluctant to take family leave that they are entitled to for fear that it will affect their career, and feel they have to work harder than colleagues to be perceived as legitimate and achieve the same recognition/rewards. Women employees were also more likely to feel that faculty/staff who have children are considered less committed to their careers.
  • Homophobia and Heterosexism LGBQ respondents were more than twice as likely than heterosexual respondents to believe that they had experienced harassment. Of those who believed they had experienced this type of conduct, 61% (n = 30) of LGBQ respondents versus two percent (n = 7) of heterosexual respondents indicated that this conduct was based on sexual orientation. More than twice as many LGBQ respondents believed they had observed offensive, hostile, exclusionary, or intimidating conduct than did heterosexual respondents (38% compared with 18%).
  • Homophobia and Heterosexism LGBQ respondents were less comfortable with the overall climate, the climate in their departments/work units, and the climate in their classes than their heterosexual counterparts. LGBQ employee respondents were less likely to believe the workplace climate was welcoming based on sexual orientation. LGBQ students respondents were less likely to think the classroom climate was welcoming based on sexual orientation LGBQ respondents were more likely to have seriously considered leaving the institution.
  • Differential Treatment by University Status  For those who reported they experienced harassment, university status was the second most common basis.  Of those respondents who believed that they had observed discriminatory hiring, advanced experience level of the job candidate was cited as the fifth most common basis for discrimination.  For those who believed they had observed discriminatory employment-related disciplinary actions and discriminatory practices related to promotion, UW-Eau Claire status was the second most common basis.
  • Differential Treatment Classified Staff  Although classified staff respondents were less likely than faculty members to believe that they had been harassed, they were more likely to attribute the conduct to their status at UW-Eau Claire.  Classified staff members were less satisfied with their jobs and much less satisfied than with the way their careers have progressed when compared with academic staff.  Classified staff members were more likely than faculty and academic staff members to believe they had observed discriminatory hiring and employment-related disciplinary actions .
  • Next Steps
  • Process Forward Fall/Winter 2010  Share report results with community  Community dialogue regarding the assessment results  Community feedback on recommended actions  Executive Summary available on the UW-Eau Claire web site  Full Report will be available by June 1  Recommended planning “advance” to begin a “call to action” regarding the challenges uncovered in the report
  • Tell Us What You Think…  Additional questions/comments on results?  Thoughts on process?  Suggested actions?
  • Questions..? Other Ideas..?