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TX History Ch 18.4
 

TX History Ch 18.4

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    TX History Ch 18.4 TX History Ch 18.4 Presentation Transcript

    • Chapter 18: Texas & the Civil War Section 4: The Texas Home Front
    • Bellwork
      • How might the Civil war have affected civilians?
      • How do you think Unionists were treated?
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • Texas suffered less than other Confederate states
      • Goods became scarce & expensive:
        • Paper
        • Medicine
        • Coffee
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • Texans adapted
      • Farmers grew less cotton and more corn and wheat
      • Slaveholders from other states sent their slaves to Texas to prevent them from being freed
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • Women & children ran plantations
      • Women worked to support the war
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft Gov. Francis Lubbock (1861-1863) Gov. Pendleton Murrah (1861-1865)
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • April 1862: Confederate Congress enacted a draft
      • Draft —law that was unpopular because some people received exemptions
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • White males 18-35
      • Later broadened to 17-50
    • The Wartime Economy & the Draft
      • Exemptions:
        • Certain jobs
        • Buy way out of service or provide substitute
    • Unionists in Texas
      • Confederate draft received opposition from Unionists
      • Most joined war effort, but some refused to fight
      • Unionists viewed as potentially dangerous traitors
    • Unionists in Texas
      • Martial law —kind of rule sometimes established in parts of Texas that were Unionist
    • Unionists in Texas
      • Some Unionists violently attacked:
        • August 1862: 60 Germans Texans attacked when fleeing to Mexico to escape draft
        • 50 Germans hanged in Central Texas when they organized to protest war
        • Oct. 1862: 40 suspected Unionists hung in the “Great Hanging” in Gainesville
    • Illustration appeared in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Weekly Newspaper February 20, 1864
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    • Problems for Unionists in Texas Effects on Unionists