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Revegetation Site Design
Revegetation Methods <ul><li>Natural regeneration </li></ul><ul><li>Tubestock or seedling planting </li></ul><ul><li>Machi...
Natural regeneration <ul><li>Method where weeds and other threats(eg stock) are removed to allow native plant seed to germ...
Natural Regeneration
 
Tubestock planting <ul><li>Greater control over planting density & position  </li></ul><ul><li>Greater control over revege...
Revegetation with tubestock
Direct seeding <ul><li>2 methods – Machine and hand </li></ul><ul><li>Limited control over planting density with Machine s...
Direct seeding continued…. <ul><li>Historically seed mixes don’t always match the vegetation type being replaced-sometimes...
 
Machine Direct seeding
Reveg Remnant
 
Machine seeding with natural thinning
Combination of machine direct seeding and tubestock planting
Hand Direct Seeding
 
 
<ul><li>Hedging your bets  </li></ul>
Placement of plants
Reducing creek line erosion
Revegetation Site Design <ul><li>Considerations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Purpose of the revegetation – for a windbreak or bio...
 
 
Broad site checklist <ul><li>Always assess existing plants, soils, threats,  opportunities & indicators on site & record t...
<ul><li>Hone plant ID skills as it is such as valuable skill for so many reasons(funding, planning & inspiring) </li></ul>...
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Revegetation Site Design

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This presentation by Ben Simon illustrates revegetation methods of hand seeding, direct seeding, seeding planting and natural revegetation. It also covers plant placement, site design, how to work around creeks and concludes with check list.

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Transcript of "Revegetation Site Design"

  1. 1. Revegetation Site Design
  2. 2. Revegetation Methods <ul><li>Natural regeneration </li></ul><ul><li>Tubestock or seedling planting </li></ul><ul><li>Machine direct seeding </li></ul><ul><li>Hand direct seeding </li></ul>
  3. 3. Natural regeneration <ul><li>Method where weeds and other threats(eg stock) are removed to allow native plant seed to germinate. </li></ul><ul><li>Only used where there is adequate natural seed-eg buffer, remnant. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually used in areas where a lot of native vegetation remains or there is a good natural seed bank in the soil </li></ul><ul><li>Often used to promote understorey species. </li></ul><ul><li>Cheap and easy method so long as follow up threat management is undertaken </li></ul><ul><li>Provides good habitat as germination and subsequent plant location is random in space and time. </li></ul><ul><li>In red gum(& other) sites be wary of over-dominance where other species may be unlikely to regenerate-e.g. ex paddock </li></ul><ul><li>Patience is required so don’t rush in and reveg </li></ul>
  4. 4. Natural Regeneration
  5. 6. Tubestock planting <ul><li>Greater control over planting density & position </li></ul><ul><li>Greater control over revegetation layout, spatial arrangement of plants & species selection </li></ul><ul><li>More labour intensive and costs more than direct seeding </li></ul><ul><li>Often requires Tree Guards </li></ul><ul><li>Requires plants to be grown in advance and so more planning & weather risks </li></ul><ul><li>More appropriate where existing understorey or a good base exists-e.g. Grassy woodland or existing over-storey with flogged understorey </li></ul><ul><li>Good for infill planting </li></ul><ul><li>Uses less seed resources than direct seeding </li></ul>
  6. 7. Revegetation with tubestock
  7. 8. Direct seeding <ul><li>2 methods – Machine and hand </li></ul><ul><li>Limited control over planting density with Machine seeding </li></ul><ul><li>Can end up with un-natural lines of plants with machine seeding- dependant on operator/client </li></ul><ul><li>Cheaper, quicker and easier than planting tubestock. </li></ul><ul><li>Seed can be collected from remnant vegetation, revegetation sites, or grown in seed orchards. </li></ul><ul><li>Method used depends on; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>seed type and amount available-lots of seed with machine. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>terrain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Climate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weed abundance on the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Native groundcover plants present on the site (machine direct seeding is high disturbance) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Soil type-e.g. V-blade seeding on non-wetting sands </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. Direct seeding continued…. <ul><li>Historically seed mixes don’t always match the vegetation type being replaced-sometimes too much variety! </li></ul><ul><li>Can be a great way to establish a dominant species back into a site prior to coming back later and placing more diversity with tube stock </li></ul><ul><li>Can continue to germinate for several years after sowing as weather permits </li></ul>
  9. 11. Machine Direct seeding
  10. 12. Reveg Remnant
  11. 14. Machine seeding with natural thinning
  12. 15. Combination of machine direct seeding and tubestock planting
  13. 16. Hand Direct Seeding
  14. 19. <ul><li>Hedging your bets </li></ul>
  15. 20. Placement of plants
  16. 21. Reducing creek line erosion
  17. 22. Revegetation Site Design <ul><li>Considerations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Purpose of the revegetation – for a windbreak or biodiversity? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The habitat type being planted-how do you choose? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The natural spatial arrangement of plants in that particular habitat type. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Site history – agricultural use, cultivation, herbicides. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Site location </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planting in a random manner where possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating diversity of habitats on larger sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Matching vegetation to soil types and the local climate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The proportion of existing natural vegetation on the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The size of the site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The method of revegetation that can be used given the terrain and environmental factors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Undertaking adequate weed and pest animal management – pre and post planting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The seed and plant resources, time, and money available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The ability for ongoing management to be undertaken </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roos and other grazing pressures </li></ul></ul>
  18. 25. Broad site checklist <ul><li>Always assess existing plants, soils, threats, opportunities & indicators on site & record them </li></ul><ul><li>Closely observe nearby remnants for guidance on species selection & seed resources-and record it </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss findings with the landholder & provide with species list ASAP-involve & listen to them </li></ul><ul><li>Think about plant association/s and try and balance species proportions accordingly-16+species??? </li></ul><ul><li>If you don’t know how to approach a technical issue get help from others </li></ul><ul><li>Does the proposed site actually need revegetation? </li></ul><ul><li>Create a map of project & ensure all parties understand where, how, when & what is being done </li></ul>
  19. 26. <ul><li>Hone plant ID skills as it is such as valuable skill for so many reasons(funding, planning & inspiring) </li></ul><ul><li>Record species suitable for reveg-key structural species on site </li></ul><ul><li>Choose method of reveg that is most practical, ethical and achievable </li></ul><ul><li>Plan well in advance- if you can </li></ul><ul><li>Keep good records and always take plenty of pics. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t forget about managing remnant vegetation and where possible incorporate revegetation to link, buffer or enhance existing remnants. </li></ul>
  20. 27. Any Questions
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