Classroom constraints & the pass-back effect:  Games designed to transcend generational divides   Marjee Chmiel- The JASON...
Design to transcend generational divides <ul><li>Adults are often the filter for our games </li></ul><ul><li>How do we add...
Part 1: Classroom Constraints <ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Standards  </li></ul><ul><li>Acc...
Time
Multiple Entry Points
Modified Challenges
Personal Goal Setting
Technology <ul><li>Many teachers don’t have installation permissions (avoid download-ables) </li></ul><ul><li>Keep student...
Standards <ul><li>Local standards matter most </li></ul><ul><li>Learning objectives must be crystal clear (what will stude...
Identify things that are the most conceptually challenging
Model Use in Classroom
Accountability <ul><li>Provide lesson plans/ worksheets for different “levels” of integration </li></ul><ul><li>Keep stand...
 
Pass it Back! Kid Apps on Grown-Up Devices PBS KIDS Interactive Nina Walia, Associate Director
<ul><li>pass-back effect :   when a parent or adult passes their own mobile device to a child to occupy them when they’re ...
<ul><li>pbskids.org </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>pbskids.org </li></ul>9 million unique visitors per month
 
Pass-Back Effect Audience:  Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Parents  AND  Kids </li></ul><ul><li>Age range of kids...
60% of Top 25 Paid Educational Apps Target Preschoolers iLearn: A Content Analysis of the iTunes App Store’s Education Sec...
Pass-Back Effect Audience:  Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Age range of kids: 2-5 year olds </li></ul><ul><li>Par...
NOT Quiet
Quiet and Engaging
Pass-Back Effect Audience:  Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Age range of kids: 2-5 year olds </li></ul><ul><li>Par...
G4L Have Two Audiences <ul><li>The learners (children) & the adults </li></ul><ul><li>For scalability, both audiences must...
Resources PBS KIDS Mobile Downloads:  pbskids.org/mobile PBS KIDS Mobile Technologies & Learning Research:  pbskids.org/re...
<ul><li>Nina Walia </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>@missmodular </li></ul>Thank you! Marjee Chmiel [em...
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Classroom Constraints and the Passback Effect: Games designed to trascend generational divides

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Games for Learning have two audiences: the learners (children) & the adults. For scalability, both audiences must be considered. Thoughtful design addresses adult & child without compromising the needs of either.

Presented at the 7th annual Games For Change Festival 2010.
5/27/10

Published in: Design, Education, Technology
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  • Time: Most classrooms (not on block scheduling) have no more than 25 minutes of usable, lesson time. While long, meaningful engagement is a hallmark of what makes a game great for many of us, that isn’t possible in a classroom, and if a teacher feels like he or she cannot get in and out without meeting some important learning objects, they are reticent to use it. The following are a few ways to provide long, meaningful engagments while designing for classroom constraints.
  • “Locked” accomplishments and no cap on a high score
  • Provide video models of teachers using the games in the classroom.
  • You know us best from TV. In 1997 we hopped onto computers with pbskids.org where we had to gleen how to make kid friendly learning experiences
  • Appear on these clunky boxes and mice meant for adults.
  • Turns out usable design can triumph – we currently get more than 9million uniques per month. Just when we had becomes experts in making guis that put kids in the drivers seat and compensate for their still developing fine motor skills using the mouse, along comes mobile.
  • We leapt onto iphones and ipod touches last year. Once again we were faced with challenges – and this time, some promising affordances – for kid centered design and education on devices intended for grown ups. But parents have needs too.
  • Strong connection between passback effect and educational apps.
  • Sid: Not enough content/educational value to make it worth it/not enough perceived value. Even though it was free. Not quiet
  • Rogers: First one with analytics. We know that the average time spend on it is 22 minutes less audio on it, engages kids with construction of something.
  • Conclusion that ties together our presentations after this slide.
  • How do we incorporate formal learning standards from the gaming in the classroom and port some of them to the informal learning environment of the back seat of the car? Boost credibility of edu games baking standards into design decisions from the getgo. Who takes the charge? Communicate to developers? Apple?
  • Classroom Constraints and the Passback Effect: Games designed to trascend generational divides

    1. 1. Classroom constraints & the pass-back effect: Games designed to transcend generational divides Marjee Chmiel- The JASON Project Nina Walia- PBS KIDS
    2. 2. Design to transcend generational divides <ul><li>Adults are often the filter for our games </li></ul><ul><li>How do we address the adults’ needs while maintaining integrity to the game vision? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Part 1: Classroom Constraints <ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Accountability </li></ul>
    4. 4. Time
    5. 5. Multiple Entry Points
    6. 6. Modified Challenges
    7. 7. Personal Goal Setting
    8. 8. Technology <ul><li>Many teachers don’t have installation permissions (avoid download-ables) </li></ul><ul><li>Keep student permission constraints in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Have as many offline options as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Keep limited bandwidth in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Support is not optional </li></ul><ul><li>Build for 4 years ago </li></ul>
    9. 9. Standards <ul><li>Local standards matter most </li></ul><ul><li>Learning objectives must be crystal clear (what will students be able to do that they could not do before?) </li></ul><ul><li>Why does the game help students meet standards better than what the teacher was doing before? </li></ul>
    10. 10. Identify things that are the most conceptually challenging
    11. 11. Model Use in Classroom
    12. 12. Accountability <ul><li>Provide lesson plans/ worksheets for different “levels” of integration </li></ul><ul><li>Keep standards up front </li></ul><ul><li>API integration/ achievement reports built into game </li></ul>
    13. 14. Pass it Back! Kid Apps on Grown-Up Devices PBS KIDS Interactive Nina Walia, Associate Director
    14. 15. <ul><li>pass-back effect : when a parent or adult passes their own mobile device to a child to occupy them when they’re on the go </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>back seat of the car </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>at restaurants </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>waiting in line </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 16. <ul><li>pbskids.org </li></ul>
    16. 18. <ul><li>pbskids.org </li></ul>9 million unique visitors per month
    17. 20. Pass-Back Effect Audience: Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Parents AND Kids </li></ul><ul><li>Age range of kids: 2-5 year olds </li></ul><ul><li>Parents passback to distract but educational value relieves the guilt </li></ul>
    18. 21. 60% of Top 25 Paid Educational Apps Target Preschoolers iLearn: A Content Analysis of the iTunes App Store’s Education Section , Joan Ganz Cooney Center, 2009
    19. 22. Pass-Back Effect Audience: Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Age range of kids: 2-5 year olds </li></ul><ul><li>Parents passback to distract but educational value relieves the guilt </li></ul><ul><li>Content must be engaging and quiet </li></ul>
    20. 23. NOT Quiet
    21. 24. Quiet and Engaging
    22. 25. Pass-Back Effect Audience: Who They Are and What They Want <ul><li>Age range of kids: 2-5 year olds </li></ul><ul><li>Parents passback to distract but educational value relieves the guilt </li></ul><ul><li>Content must be engaging and quiet </li></ul><ul><li>Most using iPhones vs. iPod Touch </li></ul>
    23. 26. G4L Have Two Audiences <ul><li>The learners (children) & the adults </li></ul><ul><li>For scalability, both audiences must be considered </li></ul><ul><li>Thoughtful design addresses adult & child without compromising the needs of either </li></ul>
    24. 27. Resources PBS KIDS Mobile Downloads: pbskids.org/mobile PBS KIDS Mobile Technologies & Learning Research: pbskids.org/read/research/ The JASON Project: www.jason.org
    25. 28. <ul><li>Nina Walia </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>@missmodular </li></ul>Thank you! Marjee Chmiel [email_address] @mchmiel

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