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Safety Training

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  • When lifting with 2 or 3 people, please follow the same 5 steps on lifting safely. Lifting a load in cooperation with others is quite difficult. Two people should not attempt to lift a load that represents their combined capability. It is recommended that two people should only lift two thirds of their capability, and three people should lift half of their capability. Lack of coordination of such a lift can easily lead to injury for one or more members of your team. Make sure aisles and pathways are free and clear of obstacles.

Lifting and handling 2 Lifting and handling 2 Presentation Transcript

  • MANUAL MATERIAL HANDLING & LIFTING
  • Lets take a look at some statistics before we began thetraining. This data will show you how many accidentshave been reported since September 1, 2011 throughMarch 3, 2012, that involves lifting, handling objectsor improper body mechanics. As this year progress thedata will change and the numbers will increase. Byoffering Safety training we hope to see a decrease inthe future of employee injuries and reportedaccidents.
  • STATISTICAL DATA 2011/2012 FOR ALL INJURIES RELATED TO LIFTING & HANDLING OBJECTS , INCLUDING INJURIES RELATED TO IMPROPER BODY MECHANICS. CLAIM CAUSE INCIDENT TYPE INCURRED AMOUNTLIFTING ASSISTING STUDENT (lifting) 310.69LIFTING TRASH/GARBAGE 15.1LIFTING CARRYING OBJECT 1932.63LIFTING LIFTING OBJECT 1816TWISTING WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 366.51TWISTING OBSTACLES (improper body mechanics) 11065.12TWISTING WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 1816TWISTING WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 16.25TWISTING WALKING SURFACE (improper body mechanics) 1516TWISTING WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 239.44BENDING JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 399.15BENDING LIFTING OBJECT 1816BODY MOTION JOB DEMANDS (improper body mechanics) 1816BODY MOTION ASSISTING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 716BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 1253.41BODY MOTION EQUIPMENT (improper body mechanics) 8566BODY MOTION LIFTING OBJECT (improper body mechanics) 4465.1BODY MOTION RESTRAINING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 558.86BODY MOTION WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 518.04BODY MOTION WALK/RUN (improper body mechanics) 318.65BODY MOTION ASSISTING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 1516
  • PAGE 2 CLAIM CAUSE INCIDENT TYPE INCURRED AMOUNTBODY MOTION GOING UP OR DOWN STAIRS (improper body mechanics) 18840.41BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 40340.55BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 1080.7BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 9533.68BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 527.58BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 1816BODY MOTION JOB TASK (improper body mechanics) 18165.66CARRYING ASSISTING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 1816CARRYING CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 332.85LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 320.42LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT TRASH/GARBAGE 520.37LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 963.42LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT CLOTHING: APPAREL/SHOES/JEWELS 2516LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT TRASH/GARBAGE 37496.2LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 1816LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT HAND TOOLS (NON-POWERED) 3316LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT EQUIPMENT - FOOD SERV/KITCHEN 338.44LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 474.22LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 339.99
  • PAGE 3 CLAIM CAUSE INCIDENT TYPE INCURRED AMOUNTLIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT TRASH/GARBAGE 1516LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT FURNITURE 716LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT TRASH/GARBAGE 2816LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 1816LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 700LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT FURNITURE 716LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 390.38LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT JOB TASK 1668.1LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 1816LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT LIFTING OBJECT 3720.23LIFTED OR HANDLED OBJECT FURNITURE 253.6MISCELLANEOUS STRAIN INJURY PUSH/PULL PATIENT 1516PUSHING/PULLING ASSISTING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 319.85PUSHING/PULLING WHEELCHAIR (improper body mechanics) 708PUSHING/PULLING PUSH/PULL OBJECT 303.44PUSHING/PULLING PUSH/PULL OBJECT 46173.95PUSHING/PULLING PUSH/PULL OBJECT 1816PUSHING/PULLING PUSH/PULL OBJECT 367.49PUSHING/PULLING CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS 401.74PUSHING/PULLING EQUIPMENT - FOOD SERV/KITCHEN 358.56REACHING RESTRAINING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 964.97STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FURNITURE (improper body mechanics) 532
  • PAGE 4 CLAIM CAUSE INCIDENT TYPE INCURRED AMOUNTSTRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FURNITURE (improper body mechanics) 465.82STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FALLEN PRODUCT (improper body mechanics) 3516STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FURNITURE (improper body mechanics) 485.19STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FALLEN PRODUCT (improper body mechanics) 1216STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT BUILDING STRUCTURES: DOORS/ETC (improper body mechanics) 322.92STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FALLEN PRODUCT (improper body mechanics) 1816STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT FURNITURE (improper body mechanics) 432.83STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT CONTAINERS: BOXES/BARRELS/BINS (improper body mechanics) 131.11STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT PLASTIC ITEM (improper body mechanics) 716STRIKE FALLING/FLYING OBJECT RESTRAINING STUDENT (improper body mechanics) 716STRUCK BY OBJECT LIFTED/HANDLE CART 348.58STRUCK BY OBJECT LIFTED/HANDLE CART 15194.16STRUCK BY OBJECT LIFTED/HANDLE FALLEN PRODUCT 525.55STRUCK BY OBJECT LIFTED/HANDLE HAND TOOLS (NON-POWERED) 708STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER FURNITURE 1516STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER BUILDING STRUCTURES: DOORS/ETC 817.16STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER BUILDING STRUCTURES: DOORS/ETC 1451.57STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER EQUIPMENT 470.46STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER EQUIPMENT 139.71STRUCK OBJECT HANDLED BY OTHER CLOTHING: APPAREL/SHOES/JEWELS 15584.85STRUCK OR INJURED BY MISC FIXTURES/FURNITURE/FURNISHINGS 716STRUCK OR INJURED BY MISC FURNITURE 12808.42
  • PAGE 5TOTAL AMOUNT INCURRED ON THESE CLAIMS 311,280.08
  • Severe Workplace Back Injury Requiring Multiple SurgeriesThis story is about my father, a man whose struggles and hope has given me the back bone to continue myminor struggles in life by looking at his grief.Almost 9 years ago, my father Tom was injured on the job and since has undergone two back operations, bothof which gave him a 50% chance of ever walking again and the inability to ever have children again, countlessvisits to the doctors, and a need for pain relief so strong his stomach and liver may eventually pay theconsequences. Chronic sciatica keeps him from his life and the constant back pain and many scars remind himevery day.Our family fell apart soon after his second operation, my mother leaving him and him left with the feeling ofincompetence, feeling less of a man. He lost all of his muscle in his legs. My father, a once strong man, was leftbarely able to walk, hunched over in a grotesque manner. Countless nights I awoke to hear cries coming frommy fathers bedroom as he lay in bed with pain. At the age of 12, I had to take over all of the family chores,cooking and cleaning, and taking on a part time job to help pay our bills. I also lost much of my time with myfather, who was unable to leave the couch for almost days at a time.His struggles continue to this day. Just yesterday, The Institute for Injured Workers informed him (on the dayof his final appeal) that they felt they would not be able to win his case, and left him in another state ofdepression. Countless lawyers, stacks of papers, bills and tears, and still he was left helpless.
  • I have been with my father through this whole ordeal and have watched him fall again and again. I havehad enough. Never have I ever seen anyone work so hard, given as much as he has, and gotten nothing inreturn. My father deserves better, like so many others. He lost his ability to work, enjoy life, live a daywithout pain, his family, dreams but never his strength. All he wanted was his compensation and maybe achance to go back to school so he can once again find a job to pay the bills.I awoke at 5:00 this morning to the sound of my father sobbing. A grown man crying because he has givenhis all and is left helpless. I carry those sounds with me now, and always will. My heart goes out to those inthe same position.All that is left is pain and it will never go away.
  • The Main causes of and Back Injury•Poor Posture•Improper Body Mechanics•Obesity and Poor Nutrition•Not using proper tools/equipment.•Working in fast paced/stressful environments.
  • What is Manual Material Handling??Manual Materials Handling (MMH) is the act of manually loading, unloading and moving ofobjects. It may include lifting, carrying, pushing, and pulling. Manual Material Handling Hazards: Awkward / Sustained posture – When performing MMH tasks the use of awkwardpostures place the individual at higher risk of injury. Examples of these postures include:bending through your back, overhead reaching, twisting through the back, etc. Extendedexposure to these postures increases the risk further. Forceful exertions – There is a limit to the amount of weight a person can handle withoutincreasing their risk of injury. This limit is different for each person. Know and respect yourlimits. Use mechanical aids wherever possible, i.e. mechanical lift, scissor lift, overheadcrane, wheel carts, turn tables, etc.
  • HOW TO CONTROL HAZARDS:To help prevent MMH injuries, employers and workers need to: Spot the hazard – Identify conditions that prevent you from using proper MMH techniques Assess the risk – Test the weight of the materials before handling  If the weight is too heavy do not handle without assistance  Does the material shape or surface make it hard to hold?  Is the load balanced?  Does the weight shift when handled?  Is the path clear of obstacles and debris? Find a safer way – Always use proper techniques to lift, carry, push, and pull. Design work area to allow proper posture and eliminate restricted or awkward postures. Ask for assistance with the materials handling task. Everyday – It is your right to be safe at work. Taking short cuts increases the chance you will be hurt. Ensure appropriate measures are taken to promote safe MMH.
  • Alternative Materials-Handling TechniquesAlternative materials-handling techniques for carrying or moving loads are to beused whenever possible to minimize lifting and bending requirements. Thesealternative techniques include the use of: Carts Forklifts Dollies Other mechanical devices
  • Carrying Objects:Technique: Hold the object close to the body and at waist to chest height. Never twist through the back when carrying a load.Assist: Use wheel carts and dollies to reduce the need to carry an object over a distance (ensure proper lifting technique is used when loading and unloading). Track mounted overhead cranes can be used to carry an object over a distance. Design the work area to reduce the distance of the carry.
  • Pushing:Technique: Never twist through the back when pushing Ensure wrists are not compressed in an awkward posture when pushing the materialAssist: Motorized pallet jacks Sloping the floor when rolling cylindrical materials Use turn tables to reposition material Place handles or pushing area between waist and shoulder height
  • LIFTINGThe amount of force you place on your back in lifting may surprise you! Never put more force on your back than you can easily carry. Anytime you find yourself lifting anything that is extremely to heavy you should think: DANGER! My back is at risk!
  • LIFTING TECHNIQUES1. Stand close to the loadwith your feet spreadapart about shoulderwidth with one footslightly in front of theother for balance.
  • LIFTING TECHNIQUES2. Squat down bendingat the knees. (Not yourwaist) Tuck your chinwhile keeping your backas vertical as possible.
  • LIFTING TECHNIQUES3. Get a firm grasp ofthe object beforebeginning the lift.
  • LIFTING TECHNIQUES4. Begin slowly liftingwith your legs bystraightening them.NEVER TWIST YOURBODY DURING THISSTEP!!!
  • HOW TO LIFT SAFELY5. Once the lift iscomplete, keep theobject as close to thebody as possible.
  • TWO/THREE MAN LIFTING6. Decide who will be incharge BEFORE youbegin the lift, and whatcommands will be used.
  • LIFTING ABOVE YOUR SHOULDERS? 7. Use a stool, ladder or better still, use a platform.
  • REMEMBER !!!!!!!!!!!!!DO NOT STAND ON TABLES OR CHAIRS!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • HOW TO PREVENT BACK INJURIES?• Exercise• Eat right• Stretch as often as possible• Reduce Stress
  • Test YourKnowledge
  • Before lifting and moving a load you should a. Plan the route you’ll take b. Check to make sure the load isn’t too high to see over c. Both A and B
  • Answer: (Both A & B) Plan the route you’ll takeCheck to make sure the load isn’t too high to see over
  • When you lift a heavy object you should:a. Bend over at the waist, keeping your back straight.b. Bend at the knees, keeping your back straight.c. Keep the load as far away from your body as possible.
  • ANSWER: BBend at the knees, keeping your back straight
  • WHEN LIFTING YOU SHOULD NOTa. Bend your kneesb. Bend at your waistc. Tighten your stomach muscles
  • ANSWER BBend at your waist
  • YOU CAN REDUCE THE RISK IN MOVING HEAVY LOADS BY: a. Using a dolly or handcart b. Finding someone to assist you in lifting the load c. Dividing the load into more than one part d. All of the above
  • ANSWER: D • Using a dolly or handcart • Finding someone to assist you in lifting the load • Dividing the load into more than one partUse as much assistance as you can when lifting heavy items
  • YOU SHOULD USE A STEPSTOOL TO REACH HIGH OBJECTSRATHER THAN REACH ABOVE YOUR SHOULDERS. a. True b. False
  • ANSWER: TRUEAlways use step stool or ladder when reaching to a high to lift something.
  • SAFETY FIRST