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  • 1. L571: Information Architecture for the Web Summer 2006 (ES 2116) Wednesday: 5:30p-8:15p Bill Helling [web@cdpl.lib.in.us ] and [whelling@indiana.edu] 765-362-2242 ext. 100 765-362-4788 [Introduction] [Grading policy] [Assignments] [Course outline] [Additional resources] Required class text: Rosenfeld, Louis and Peter Morville. (2002). Information architecture for the world wide web, 2nd edition. O'Reilly & Associates. Suggested class text: I provide handouts and links to several sites that offer all you need to know about our level of HTML and CSS. However, if you wish to have a book or reference guide, consider any text that covers HTML 4.01 as well as CSS 2.0 (Note: One book does not need to cover both topics). For example: Castro, ELizabeth. (2002) HTML for the World Wide Web with XHTML and CSS: Visual QuickStart Guide, Fifth Edition. Introduction The Internet is unlike anything that humankind has seen before. It is global in its reach: With the proper equipment, the Internet can extend into any corner of our world. It is robust in its architecture: Because it has no central control, the Internet can't be totally stopped without every single connection being reached. It is enabling: Any person or machine has the capability to communicate almost instantaneously with another person or machine. It fosters free speech: Except on very local levels, the Internet can't be completely censored or filtered. It
  • 2. continues to grow: The Internet is growing and expanding at such a rate that the keeping of statistics on this movement often seems to be based on conjecture. This course emphasizes the development of certain basic skills that will allow you to create web documents. This course also explores design, organization, navigation, and interactivity aspects of web site creation. The study of these aspects will allow you to appreciate the way that the Internet is changing the nature of communication. You will then be able to understand better and perhaps manage more efficiently this impact. You will do the following this semester: • review current HTML markup • develop proficiency in Cascading Stylesheets (CSS) • explore the basics of DHTML (HTML+CSS+JavaScript) • explore XHTML and prepare yourself for future directions in web authoring • gain a better understanding of web page layout, design, labeling, and navigation • gain a better appreciation of what it takes to make a web site usable and accessible • understand how to organize a nd present digital information on the web Through your grasp of technical skills and your understanding of the Internet as an organizational challenge, you will be in a better position to recognize the role that you or your organization can play in an info rmation network. Grading Policy To receive a passing grade in this course, you must turn in all the assignments and the term project and do your presentation. You cannot pass this course without doing all the assigned work. Note: Turning in all the work is not a guarantee that you will pass the course. Grades of I (Incomplete) may be assigned in this course only after discussion with the instructor. All assignments must be submitted on the dates specified in this syllabus. If you cannot submit an assignment or cannot deliver a presentation on the date it is due, it is your responsibility to discuss your situation with the instructor, preferably in advance. Arrangements for the completion of the outstanding work can be made only at the discretion of the instructor. Work turned in after the assigned date will reflect a penalty, of course, applied at the discretion of the instructor. Criteria for evaluation
  • 3. To receive a passing grade in this course, you must turn in all the assignments. You cannot pass this course without doing all the assigned work. Note: Turning in all the work is not a guarantee that you will pass the course. Grades of I (Incomplete) may be assigned in this course only after discussion with the instructor. All assignments must be submitted o n the dates specified in this syllabus. If you cannot submit an item on the date it is due, it is your responsibility to discuss your situation with the instructor, preferably in advance. Arrangements for the completion of the outstanding work can be made only at the discretion of the instructor. Work turned in after the assigned date will reflect a penalty, of course, applied at the discretion of the instructor. Indiana University and School of Library and Information Science policies on academic dishonesty will be followed. Students found to be engaging in plagiarism, cheating, and other types of dishonesty will receive a failing grade for the course. Grade Computation: A (4.0) Outstanding achievement Student performance demonstrates full command of he course materials and evinces a high level of originality and/or creativity that far surpasses course expectations. A- (3.7) Excellent achievement Student performance demonstrates thorough knowledge of the course materials and exceeds course expectations by completing all requirements in a superior manner. B+ (3.3) Very good work Student performance demonstrates above-average comprehension of the course materials and exceeds course expectations on all tasks as defined in the course syllabus. B (3.0) Good work Student performance meets designated course expectations, demonstrates understanding of the course materials and is at an acceptable level. B- (2.7) Marginal work Student performance demonstrates incomplete understanding of course materials. C+ (2.3) Unsatisfactory work Student performance demonstrates incomplete and inadequate understanding of course materials. C (2.0) Unsatisfactory work Student performance demonstrates incomplete and inadequate understanding of course materials. C- (1.7) Unacceptable work Coursework performed at this level will not count toward the MLS or MIS degree.
  • 4. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a passing grade. D+ (1.3) Unacceptable work Coursework performed at this level will not count toward the MLS or MIS degree. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a passing grade. D (1.0) Unacceptable work Coursework performed at this level will not count toward the MLS or MIS degree. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a passing grade. D- (1.7) Unacceptable work Coursework performed at this level will not count toward the MLS or MIS degree. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a passing grade. F (0.0) Failing Student may continue in program only with permission of the Dean. Note: If you are a student with a special need, please feel free to discuss it with me. Academic Misconduct (Taken from Academic Handbook, 2001and the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conduct) http://www.indiana.edu/~deanfac/acadhbk/acad_handbk_2001.pdf 1. Cheating A student must not use or attempt to use unauthorized assistance, materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise, including, but not limited to, the following: • A student must not use external assistance on any "in-class" or "take- home" examination, unless the instructor specifically has authorized external assistance. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors, books, notes, and calculators. • A student must not use another person as a substitute in the taking of an examination or quiz. • A student must not steal examinations or other course materials. • A student must not allow others to conduct research or to prepare work for him or her without advance authorization from the instructor to whom the work is being submitted. Under this prohibition, a student must not make any unauthorized use of materials obtained from commercial term paper companies or from files of papers prepared by other persons. • A student must not collaborate with other persons on a particular project and submit a copy of a written report which is represented explicitly or implicitly as the student's individual work.
  • 5. • A student must not use any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory, at a computer terminal, or on field work. • A student must not submit substantial portions of the same academic work for credit or honors more than once without permission of the instructor to whom the work is being submitted. • A student must not alter a grade or score in any way. 2. Fabrication A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an academic exercise including, but not limited to, records or reports, laboratory results, and citations to the sources of information. 3. Plagiarism A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of another person without appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness whenever he or she does any of the following: • Quotes another person's actual words, either oral or written; • Paraphrases another person's words, either oral or written; • Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory; or • Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative material, unless the information is common knowledge. 4. Interference • A student must not steal, change, destroy, or impede another student's work. Impeding another student's work includes, but is not limited to, the theft, defacement, or mutilation of resources so as to deprive others of the information they contain. • A student must not give or offer a bribe, promise favo rs, or make threats with the intention of affecting a grade or the evaluation of academic performance. Assignments Your web-based work must be clearly marked up. All assignments are to be posted on the Web by class time on the date indicated. All markup must conform to the HTML 4.01 standard excluding all deprecated HTML. HTML/CSS markup
  • 6. Due: May 31 Weight: 20% You will design a mini web site for a library, business, an any other organization of your choice. Start by creating a "home page" for this organization. On this home page you must have: • links to at least five external pages/documents that you do not own • links to at least five other pages you have created for this site (these pages can have "dummy" content) • at least two images (not including a background image) Within the site you must also have: • at least two tables for information presentation Link your site to at least one cascading stylesheet. Do not use any deprecated HTML. Accessibility assignment Due: June 28 Weight: 15% You will create a mini web site based on the topic of your choice. You must use a stylesheet (internal or external). This home page must meet the standards for accessibility as determined by the W3C discussed during the semester. Use the WebXACT validator (http://webxact.watchfire.com/) to check your site's accessibility to meet the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0. You will have at minimum: • at least three external links to documents you do not own • at least three links to other "dummy" pages you have created • at least two tables for information presentation • at least five images (not including a background image) You can, of course, include any of the preceding requirements on the less- developed dummy pages, if you wish, instead of trying to put them all on your home page. Be sure, however, to make your home page an attractive starting point. XHMTL markup Due: July 12 Weight: 20%
  • 7. You will be given text to mark up using basic XHTML. You choose how you want to tag the document as long as you conform to the XHTML 1.0 strict DTD. You must use an external stylesheet. Your XHTML must . . . • be valid and well formed • use the proper syntax for all non-empty and empty elements • contain properly formatted attributes and values You must use a minimum amount of styles as categorized on the CSS Reference Chart (css-quickref.doc) • three from the FONT section • three from the TEXT section • three from the COLOR and BACKGROUND section • three from the BOX section Choose one of the following documents to mark up (these are .txt files): • La Fontaine • Blake • Houseman • Lear • Villon • Mother Goose selection Final project Due: August 2 Weight: 30% Develop a web site for some organization: a business, a museum, a school, a library, etc. You will consider developing a site for a real client, if possible. The site should be useful, contain significant content, be attractive, and be targeted at a specific audience. This site will thus combine your grasp of information architecture (layout, design, navigation, branding, labeling, usability, accessibility, etc.) with your markup abilities. Ideas for projects will be discussed in class throughout the semester. Although no predetermined list of clients for this project exists, you must clear your topic with the instructor. Samples from previous classes (.txt file) Grading Breakdown Basic HTML markup = 20% Accessibility assignment = 15% XHTML markup = 20%
  • 8. Final project = 30% Participation = 15% GRADE CALCULATOR (.xls file) Course Outline NOTE: read the assigned chapters before working on any assignment Information for the world wide web (Rosenfeld & Morville) notes: Chapters 1-16 (.doc) May 10 Introduction to Information Architecture Introduction to the browser medium: Browser information Introduction to publishing on the web: At IU, how can I publish personal pages on Mypage? HTML 4.01: HTML Review (.doc) Minimal HTML: Minimal HTML Introduction to HTML tables: tables May 17 HTML review (cont.): <head> section: Basic <head> Possibilities (.doc) DOCTYPE: DOCTYPE list (.doc) HTML entities: ASCII Entities for HTML (.doc) Image formats: Common image formats for the Web (.doc) Introduction to HTML forms: forms Basic HTML forms: Basic HTML Forms (.doc)
  • 9. Basic HTML page for review and practice: jefferson.html Introduction to CSS: CSS Quick Reference Chart (.doc) How to call a style: Calli ng CSS (.doc) May 24 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (Part I): Chapters 1-3 Introduction to CSS (cont.) CSS Syntax: CSS Syntax: internal and external (.doc) and CSS Syntax: inline (.doc) May 31 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (Part II): Chapters 4 -7 CSS Review: CSS samples CSS Box Model: CSS Box Model (.doc) June 7 no class June 14 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (Part II): Chapters 8 -9 CSS Review (cont.): CSS samples June 21 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (Part III): Chapters 10-12 Introduction to web accessibility Making Your Web Site Accessible in Ten Easy Steps: PowerPoint presentation Accessibility readings and exercises: accessibility.html Accessibility basics: Introduction to Accessibility (.doc)
  • 10. June 28 XHMTL: (W3Schools XHTML Tutorial: http://www.w3schools.com/xhtml/) XHTML review: xhtml-intro.html July 5 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (Part IV): Chapters 13-16 Final project discussions July 12 Introduction to JavaScript JavaScript notes and samples: javascript-intro.html Final project discussions July 19 Introduction to DHTML DHTML samples: dom-intro.html DHTML Basics: • DHTML and the DOM (.doc) • DOM Event Handlers (.doc) • Anatomy of a DHTML Event (.doc) Special problems in IA: • Web Usability (.doc) • Web Page Layout and Design (.doc) • Navigation (.doc) July 26 Review of JavaScript and DHTML Introduction to XML and future web trends XML Samples and Exercises: XML Samples (.doc)
  • 11. Review of IA principles Special problems in IA August 2 Final project presentations Additional Resources Information Architecture IAwiki http://www.iawiki.net/IAwiki Wyllys, R.E. (2000). Information Architecture http://www.gslis.utexas.edu/~l38613dw/readings/InfoArchitecture.html HTML W3Schools HTML Tutorial http://www.w3schools.com/html/ CSS Design Detector: CSS2 Test Suite Failures (Christopher Hester, 2003) http://www.designdetector.com/articles/results.html Eric Meyer's CSS2 Test Suite http://www.meyerweb.com/eric/css/tests/css2/ Page Layout, Design, and Usability Anybrowser.org. (2004). Viewable With Any Browser Campaign for a Non- Browser Specific WWW http://www.anybrowser.org/campaign/ Flanders, V. (2004). Web pages that suck. http://www.webpagesthatsuck.com/ Gillespie, G. (2004). Web page design for designers http://www.wpdfd.com/wpdhome.htm
  • 12. Nielsen, J. (2004). The Alertbox: Current Issues in Web Usability http://www.useit.com/alertbox/ Spiderpro (2001) Styleguide: 100 Do's and Don'ts in Web Design http://www.spiderpro.com/pr/prstgm001.html JavaScript W3Schools. (2004). JavaScript Tutorial: http://www.w3schools.com/js/ XHTML Claben, M. (2001). XHTML 1.0: Where XML and HTML meet. Webreference.com. http://www.webreference.com/xml/column6/ Richmond, A. (2000). Introduction to XHTML, with eXamples. Web Developer's Virtual Library. http://www.wdvl.com/Authoring/Languages/XML/XHTML/ DHTML Brattli, T. (2004). DHTMLcentral.com: Home page http://www.dhtmlcentral.com/ W3Schools. (2004). DHTML Tutorial http://www.w3schools.com/dhtml/ Web Site Content and Navigation Morris, C. (2004). Basic Principles of Web Site Navigation. Web Developer's Journal http://www.webdevelopersjournal.com/articles/navigation.html Zaphiris, P. and Mtei, L. Depth vs Breadth in the Arrangement of Web Links http://www.otal.umd.edu/SHORE/bs04/ Web Site Accessibility Webreference: Accessibility and the Web http://www.webreference.com/authoring/design/usability/accessibility/ Web Site Accessibility (2004) http://www.lgta.org/accessibility/
  • 13. WebABLE (2004) http://www.webable.com/ State of Connecticut Universal Website Accessibility Policy (2002) http://www.cmac.state.ct.us/access/policies/accesspolicy40.html Website Accessibility - Access Washington (2001) http://www.aasa.dshs.wa.gov/access/default.htm Validators W3C HTML/XHTML Validator http://validator.w3.org/ W3C CSS Validation Service http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/validator-uri.html You can also install a software program on your computer to perform HTML validation. Here are some examples: TidyGUI http://perso.wanadoo.fr/ablavier/TidyGUI/ CSE HTML Validator Lite http://www.htmlvalidator.com/lite/ _