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Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes
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Managing Diseases in Warm-Season Landscapes

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Moore County T&O Conference …

Moore County T&O Conference
March 1, 2011

Published in: Education
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Disease Management in Warm-Season TurfgrassesLane TredwayAssociate Professor and Extension SpecialistDepartment of Plant PathologyNorth Carolina State University
    • 2. Few disease problems occur onwarm-season turfgrasses.
    • 3. They are most susceptible in fall, winter, and spring.
    • 4. What are the keys to successful disease management?
    • 5. Provide a good growing environment.
    • 6. Manage the turf properly.
    • 7. CarolinaLawnsA Guide to MaintainingQuality Turf in the Landscape 1
    • 8. Don’t over-irrigate!
    • 9. Turf Irrigation Management System http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/tims
    • 10. Diagnose problems accurately.
    • 11. Disease diagnosis is troubleshooting
    • 12. Submit samples for disease diagnosis.
    • 13. NC State Turf Diagnostics Lab ncstateturfdiagnostics.com
    • 14. Disease Diagnosis Decision Aidwww.turffiles.ncsu.edu/diseaseID
    • 15. Select the right fungicide.
    • 16. How do you choose a fungicide?
    • 17. How do you choose a fungicide?Heritage (0.2 oz, 28 day) Eagle (1.2 oz, 14 day)
    • 18. Fungicide SelectionReferences• Product Labels• Pest Control for Professional Turf Managers• TurfFiles Disease Profiles• TurfFiles Fungicide Selection Tool
    • 19. Diseases of Centipedegrass • large patch • dollar spot • fairy ring
    • 20. Diseases of St. Augustinegrass • large patch • gray leaf spot • take-all root rot
    • 21. Diseases of Zoysiagrass • large patch • dollar spot • rust • Curvularia blight • spring dead spot • fairy ring
    • 22. Though caused by the same fungus, brown patch and largepatch are very different diseases.
    • 23. Though caused by the same fungus, brown patch and largepatch are very different diseases.
    • 24. Large patch causes rotting of the leaf sheaths beginning in late symmer, which leads to foliar dieback in fall or spring.
    • 25. Large patch is the most severe disease of zoysiagrass
    • 26. Centipedegrass is most susceptible to large patch
    • 27. Large patch rarely causes long-term damage to bermudagrass.
    • 28. Conditions favoring large patch development• infection occurs when soil temperatures are below 70°F• saturated thatch/soil• excessive nitrogen during periods of slow growth• excessive thatch accumulation• low mowing heights
    • 29. What is wrong with this picture?
    • 30. Large patch is active when soil temperatures are below 70ºF
    • 31. Controlling Large Patch with Fungicides• preventative applications most effective• initiate in fall when soil temperatures decline below 70°F• one properly timed application will provide good control in most landscape situations• in severe cases, repeat applications on 4 to 6 week intervals may be necessary• curative applications help to reduce further spread, but recovery will be slow
    • 32. provide outstanding control ofQoI Fungicides Rhizoctonia diseases
    • 33. Fungicides for Large Patch ControlBenzimidazoles Contacts • thiophanate-methyl (3336) • chlorothalonil (Daconil)***QoI • fludioxonil (Medallion) • azoxystrobin (Heritage) • mancozeb (Fore) • fluoxystrobin (Disarm) • polyoxin D (Endorse) • pyraclostrobin (Insignia) Dicarboxamides • trifloxystrobin (Compass) • iprodione (Chipco 26GT)***DMIs • vinclozolin (Curalan)*** • fenarimol (Rubigan) Benzamides • myclobutanil (Eagle) • flutolanil (Prostar) • propiconazole (Banner) • triadimefon (Bayleton) ***Not labeled for application to landscape turfgrasses
    • 34. Large patch control in ‘Meyer’ zoysiagrass Untreated Banner Maxx (4 fl oz) Heritage (0.4 oz) Bayleton (1 oz) Prostar (2.2 oz) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Large Patch Incidence (%)Lawrence, KSTreatments applied Oct 8Data collected Apr 24
    • 35. Untreated Bayleton (2 oz)
    • 36. Spring dead spot symptoms appear in spring as thebermudagrass resumes growth.
    • 37. Spring Dead Spot Attacks All Below-Ground TissuesInjury to roots, stolons, and rhizomes renders the bermudagrassmore prone to winter injury.
    • 38. Conditions Favoring Spring Dead Spot Development • any factor that restricts root growth • soil compaction • excessive thatch • wet soils • any factor that reduces winter hardiness • excessive nitrogen in fall • potassium deficiency • wet soils
    • 39. Regular aerification reduces spring dead spot development
    • 40. Recovery from spring dead spot is very slow....
    • 41. Speeding Spring Dead Spot Recovery• avoid use of DNA herbicides in spring - dithiopyr (Dimension) - pendimethalin (Pendulum)• aerify or spike affected areas every two weeks• apply light and frequent irrigation• apply 1 lb N per 1000 per month from May to Sept
    • 42. Spring dead spot can be controlled with fungicides
    • 43. Rubigan (6 + 6 fl oz) Untreated Control
    • 44. Keys to Successful Control of SDS• commit to implementing program for at least 3 years• map affected areas in spring for treatment• select an effective product• apply preventatively in fall when soil temperatures are between 60˚F and 80˚F• water-in immediately with 1/8” to 1/4” of irrigation
    • 45. Two species of Ophiosphaerella cause spring dead spot
    • 46. Nitrogen Source Influences Spring Dead Spot Dvelopment Sulfur Coated Urea Calcium Nitrate Urea Ammonium Sulfate Spring Dead Spot Index (diameter*incidence) 90 25 a O. herpotricha a O. korrae a 75 a 20 a 60 a 15 45 a a a b a a 10 30 ab b ab 5 15 b a b a a c a b b 0 0 2007 2008 2009 2007 2008 2009Nitrogen treatments applied monthy from May through August in 2006, 2007, and 20081 lb N per 1000 ft2 per application; 4 lbs N per 1000 ft2 per year
    • 47. Urea
    • 48. Ammonium Sulfate
    • 49. Calcium Nitrate
    • 50. Gray leaf spot of St. Augustinegrass.
    • 51. Gray leaf spot is most severe in St. Augustinegrass that isgrowing slowly or is mowed infrequently.
    • 52. Gray leaf spot rarely causes significant damage to well-managedSt. Augustinegrass.
    • 53. Conditions Favoring Gray Leaf Spot• 75ºF to 95ºF• Extended periods of leaf wetness• Most severe in newly established plantings• High mowing heights and/or infrequent mowing• Slowly growing turf• Turf stressed by nutrient deficiency, drought, or traffic

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