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Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
Orangutan
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Orangutan

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  • we’ve talk deforestation for palm oil industry and agricultural practice of Indonesia’s farmers. Where\n
  • \nOrangutans are native to Indonesia and Malaysia. Their survival is seriously endangered by illegal logging, forest fires including those associated with the rapid spread of oil palm plantations, illegal hunting and trade. In the last few years, timber companies have played a larger part in putting this species in danger when they started to enter national park. \n\n
  • Official Indonesian data reveal that illegal logging has recently taken place in 37 of 41 surveyed national parks in Indonesia. Some also seriously affected by mining and oil palm plantation development. Satellite imagery from 2006 document confirmed that protected areas that area important for orangutans are being deforested. It is often reported that Logging companies use bribery or armed force. Besides, ark rangers have insufficient numbers, arms, equipment and training to cope with these illegal practices\n
  • If current logging trends continue, most of Indonesia’s national parks are likely to be severely damaged within the next decade. This is because these national parks are amongst the last areas to hold a large amount of valuable timber of Indonesia. The situation is now bad for both the Bornean orangutan and Sumatran orangutan. These species are classed as Endangered and Critically Endangered respectively by the World Conservation Union (IUCN)\nBecause of the rapid rate of deforestation and killing of orangutans, More than one thousand of them are now living in rescue centres in Borneo alone.\n
  • If current logging trends continue, most of Indonesia’s national parks are likely to be severely damaged within the next decade. This is because these national parks are amongst the last areas to hold a large amount of valuable timber of Indonesia. The situation is now bad for both the Bornean orangutan and Sumatran orangutan. These species are classed as Endangered and Critically Endangered respectively by the World Conservation Union (IUCN)\nBecause of the rapid rate of deforestation and killing of orangutans, More than one thousand of them are now living in rescue centres in Borneo alone.\n
  • A series of international and national initiatives have been developed to address illegal logging. However, it is evident that Asian, European and North American markets are still major buyers of illegally logged wood products, which often change ownership and recorded country-of-origin multiple times during transport. An estimated 73–88% of all timber logged in Indonesia is illegal. \nIf the immediate crisis in reducing number of orangutan and protection of national park is not resolved, very few wild orangutans will be left within two decades. \nGiven the rate of deforestation in the past five years, and recent widespread investment in oil palm plantations and biodiesel refineries, it is estimated that 98% of the forest may be destroyed by 2022, \n
  • Orangutans survive only in the tropical rainforests of Borneo and northern Sumatra. The animal depends on rainforest for food and nesting sites. Orangutan populations are seriously affected when their forest is destroyed or logged, not least because they are often killed for meat or to protect newly planted crops. For example, in the Sebangau swamp forests of central Borneo, orangutans fled from illegal logging operations, moving into less ideal habitat. The result is that death rate among young orangutans increases and there were fewer births amongst females. When the forest started to regenerate, the orangutans were able to return. \n
  • orangutans have long lifetimes, long “childhoods” and relatively low reproductive rates, which makes it difficult for them to recover when large numbers are killed. Recent estimates suggest that there are 45 000 to 69 000 Bornean orangutans and only 7 300 Sumatran orangutans remaining in the wild (Caldecott & Miles 2005). The Bornean orangutan is classified as Endangered by IUCN (the World Conservation Union), indicating that it has a very high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future. \n
  • The Sumatran orangutan is classified as Critically Endangered by IUCN, indicating that it has an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild in the near future. Since 1900, the number of Sumatran orangutans is thought to have fallen by about 91%. The loss is even faster towards the end of the twentieth century (McConkey 2005). As a result of logging, infrastructure development, internal migration and plantation development. \n
  • Orangutan biology\nOrangutans are intelligent, strong, large primates, and live a semi-solitary life in the trees. A balanced orangutan diet consists of fruits and seeds, but they are also able to eat foodstuffs such as bark, leaves and insects to survive in times of shortage. Fresh sleeping nests are built from branches and leaves almost every evening.\nSumatran orangutans are only found in Indonesia, and Bornean orangutans only in Indonesia and Malaysia, with occasional males reported as wandering into Brunei Darussalam.\n\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. ORANGUTANScritically endangered species of indonesia
    • 2. ORANGUTANS
    • 3. ORANGUTANSnative to Indonesia and Malaysiaendangered by illegal logging,forest fires, palm oil plantationillegal hunting and tradetimber companies illegallyentered national parks
    • 4. NATIONAL PARKS
    • 5. NATIONAL PARKSillegal logging in 37 of 41 nationalparks, mining, oil palm plantationprotected areas are beingdeforestedBribery, armed force by loggingcompaniesinsufficient numbers of parkrangers, arms, equipment, training
    • 6. ENDANGERED ORANGUTANS
    • 7. ENDANGERED ORANGUTANSBornean orangutan, SumatranorangutanEndangered and CriticallyEndangeredmore than a thousandorangutans in rescue centers inBorneo alone
    • 8. ENDANGERED ORANGUTANSBornean orangutan, SumatranorangutanEndangered and CriticallyEndangeredmore than a thousandorangutans in rescue centers inBorneo alone
    • 9. ILLEGAL LOGGING
    • 10. ILLEGAL LOGGINGAsian, European, North Americanmarket for illegally logged woodproducts73-88% of logging is illegalIf remained unsolved, very feworangutans will be left in 2 decades98% of forest maybe destroyed by2022
    • 11. ORANGUTAN
    • 12. ORANGUTANsurvive only in tropicalrainforest of Borneo, N.Sumatrarainforest is source of food andnesting sitesaffected by deforestation andlogging, being killed for meatand protection of new crop
    • 13. ORANGUTAN
    • 14. ORANGUTAN long lifetime, long ‘childhoods’ low reproductive rate 45,000-69,000 Bornean orangutans and 7,300 Sumatran orangutans
    • 15. ENDANGERED SPECIES
    • 16. ENDANGERED SPECIESSumatran orangutan = CriticallyEndangeredSince 1900, number fallen by91%result of logging, infrastructuredevelopment, internalmigration, plantationdevelopment
    • 17. WHAT IS ORANGUTAN LIKE? http://www.orangutans.com.au/
    • 18. WHAT IS ORANGUTAN LIKE?intelligent, strong, large primates,semi-solitary life in treesfruit, seeds, bark, leaves, insectfresh sleeping nestsSumatran Orangutan found inIndonesiaBornean =Indonesia, Malaysia,Brunei http://www.orangutans.com.au/
    • 19. ORANGUTANS & PALM OIL
    • 20. ORANGUTANS & PALM OIL Orangutans & Palm Oil BOS team in action Borneo Orangutan Survivors Orangutan Babies
    • 21. ASSIGNMENT
    • 22. ASSIGNMENT
    • 23. ASSIGNMENT500 words reflection onOrangutandue on Sunday 8 pm
    • 24. Referenceshttp://www.orangutans.com.au/http://www.grida.no/publications/rr/orangutan/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsR_IpECSZ8&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FsR_IpECSZ8http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCGoUYsS5-0http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxioapZ1nww&feature=relmfuhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9VaSNzjJJ4&NR=1&feature=endscreen

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