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Mekong river part 3 save the mekong

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  • One of the differences between the Mississippi and the Mekong River is that while the Mississippi run through only one country, the Mekong runs passes four different countries of the Lower Mekong Basin. Therefore, management of water and its resources requires a transnational organization to help manage its resources. \nLaos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam established the Mekong River Commission (MRC) in 1995 to assist in the management and coordinated use of the Mekong's resources. In 1996 China and Burma, the two upstream countries which share the Mekong River, became "dialogue partners" of the MRC and the six countries now work together within a cooperative framework.\n\n
  • One of the differences between the Mississippi and the Mekong River is that while the Mississippi run through only one country, the Mekong runs passes four different countries of the Lower Mekong Basin. Therefore, management of water and its resources requires a transnational organization to help manage its resources. \nLaos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam established the Mekong River Commission (MRC) in 1995 to assist in the management and coordinated use of the Mekong's resources. In 1996 China and Burma, the two upstream countries which share the Mekong River, became "dialogue partners" of the MRC and the six countries now work together within a cooperative framework.\n\n
  • However, when one country takes advantage of the shared resources without consulting its neighbors, problems occur.\nSince mid 2006, the government of Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand have granted approval to Thai, Malaysian, Chinese, Russian, and Vietnamese companies to investigate eleven dams on the mekong River mainstream. If built, it is claimed that these dams would harm the river’s ecology and block the major fish migration that feed and provide income to millions of people downstream. \n\n
  • Seven of the dam sites are in Laos, two are in Cambodia, and two are on the Thai-Lao border. The main purpose of these proposed dams would be to generate over 14,000 megawatts of electricity which would be sent to big cities in Thailand and Vietnam. \n
  • Seven of the dam sites are in Laos, two are in Cambodia, and two are on the Thai-Lao border. The main purpose of these proposed dams would be to generate over 14,000 megawatts of electricity which would be sent to big cities in Thailand and Vietnam. \n
  • As of July 2009, nine of the Project were at the feasibility stage ความเหมาะสมของโครงการ ปัญหา และความต้องการ, while two project, which are the Don Sahong and Xayabouri, had advanced to detailed design stage. The projects are plan to be commissioned between 2013 and 2020. \nThe Don Sahong dam in southern Lao will block the most important migration channel through the Siphandone island-complex while the other ten will block the mainstream channel’s entire width. \n
  • Siphandone in southern laos is characterized by numerous islands, wide river with a series of deep pools, narrow channels, rapids and large number of smaller islets. \nMost species of fish in the mekong are migratory and the habitats of Siphandone are critical to successful migrations. As water recede at the start of the dry season, fish move out of their feeding ground in the floodplains and tributaries and move upriver to their dry season feeding and refuge areas, including many deep pools in the Siphandone area. At the end of the dry season when the monsoon rains starts once more and water levels start to rise, fish migrate south down the Mekong and/or migrate into streams where they spawn. The rising flood waters of of the rainy season carry their eegs, larvae and juvenile fish to the floodplain area including tonle sap and the delta, providing vast area for the growing fish. Upto 75 % of the fish catch in the Tonle Sap depends on fish that migrate to the deep pools from Kratie to Siphandone for dry season home.\n\nHou Sahong, the most important bottlenecks for dry season fish migrations or the most important channel of laos \nThe fisheris of Siphandone are threatened by sustainable fishing, and some fishing practices in siphandone area contributing to the declineof important species. The fishermen cleverly exploit the natural features of the river that funnel large fish migrations through narrow areas where large numbers are caught with Li traps as well as nets and other gear. The beautiful photographs \n\nDams and reservoirs block natural fish migration routes, dams also alter the amount, timing an sseed of flow of rivers, the river’s natural patterns of erosion and silt deposition; as well as water temperature and water quality \n
  • Siphandone in southern laos is characterized by numerous islands, wide river with a series of deep pools, narrow channels, rapids and large number of smaller islets. \nMost species of fish in the mekong are migratory and the habitats of Siphandone are critical to successful migrations. As water recede at the start of the dry season, fish move out of their feeding ground in the floodplains and tributaries and move upriver to their dry season feeding and refuge areas, including many deep pools in the Siphandone area. At the end of the dry season when the monsoon rains starts once more and water levels start to rise, fish migrate south down the Mekong and/or migrate into streams where they spawn. The rising flood waters of of the rainy season carry their eegs, larvae and juvenile fish to the floodplain area including tonle sap and the delta, providing vast area for the growing fish. Upto 75 % of the fish catch in the Tonle Sap depends on fish that migrate to the deep pools from Kratie to Siphandone for dry season home.\n\nHou Sahong, the most important bottlenecks for dry season fish migrations or the most important channel of laos \nThe fisheris of Siphandone are threatened by sustainable fishing, and some fishing practices in siphandone area contributing to the declineof important species. The fishermen cleverly exploit the natural features of the river that funnel large fish migrations through narrow areas where large numbers are caught with Li traps as well as nets and other gear. The beautiful photographs \n\nDams and reservoirs block natural fish migration routes, dams also alter the amount, timing an sseed of flow of rivers, the river’s natural patterns of erosion and silt deposition; as well as water temperature and water quality \n
  • Siphandone in southern laos is characterized by numerous islands, wide river with a series of deep pools, narrow channels, rapids and large number of smaller islets. \nMost species of fish in the mekong are migratory and the habitats of Siphandone are critical to successful migrations. As water recede at the start of the dry season, fish move out of their feeding ground in the floodplains and tributaries and move upriver to their dry season feeding and refuge areas, including many deep pools in the Siphandone area. At the end of the dry season when the monsoon rains starts once more and water levels start to rise, fish migrate south down the Mekong and/or migrate into streams where they spawn. The rising flood waters of of the rainy season carry their eegs, larvae and juvenile fish to the floodplain area including tonle sap and the delta, providing vast area for the growing fish. Upto 75 % of the fish catch in the Tonle Sap depends on fish that migrate to the deep pools from Kratie to Siphandone for dry season home.\n\nHou Sahong, the most important bottlenecks for dry season fish migrations or the most important channel of laos \nThe fisheris of Siphandone are threatened by sustainable fishing, and some fishing practices in siphandone area contributing to the declineof important species. The fishermen cleverly exploit the natural features of the river that funnel large fish migrations through narrow areas where large numbers are caught with Li traps as well as nets and other gear. The beautiful photographs \n\nDams and reservoirs block natural fish migration routes, dams also alter the amount, timing an sseed of flow of rivers, the river’s natural patterns of erosion and silt deposition; as well as water temperature and water quality \n
  • Siphandone in southern laos is characterized by numerous islands, wide river with a series of deep pools, narrow channels, rapids and large number of smaller islets. \nMost species of fish in the mekong are migratory and the habitats of Siphandone are critical to successful migrations. As water recede at the start of the dry season, fish move out of their feeding ground in the floodplains and tributaries and move upriver to their dry season feeding and refuge areas, including many deep pools in the Siphandone area. At the end of the dry season when the monsoon rains starts once more and water levels start to rise, fish migrate south down the Mekong and/or migrate into streams where they spawn. The rising flood waters of of the rainy season carry their eegs, larvae and juvenile fish to the floodplain area including tonle sap and the delta, providing vast area for the growing fish. Upto 75 % of the fish catch in the Tonle Sap depends on fish that migrate to the deep pools from Kratie to Siphandone for dry season home.\n\nHou Sahong, the most important bottlenecks for dry season fish migrations or the most important channel of laos \nThe fisheris of Siphandone are threatened by sustainable fishing, and some fishing practices in siphandone area contributing to the declineof important species. The fishermen cleverly exploit the natural features of the river that funnel large fish migrations through narrow areas where large numbers are caught with Li traps as well as nets and other gear. The beautiful photographs \n\nDams and reservoirs block natural fish migration routes, dams also alter the amount, timing an sseed of flow of rivers, the river’s natural patterns of erosion and silt deposition; as well as water temperature and water quality \n
  • Siphandone in southern laos is characterized by numerous islands, wide river with a series of deep pools, narrow channels, rapids and large number of smaller islets. \nMost species of fish in the mekong are migratory and the habitats of Siphandone are critical to successful migrations. As water recede at the start of the dry season, fish move out of their feeding ground in the floodplains and tributaries and move upriver to their dry season feeding and refuge areas, including many deep pools in the Siphandone area. At the end of the dry season when the monsoon rains starts once more and water levels start to rise, fish migrate south down the Mekong and/or migrate into streams where they spawn. The rising flood waters of of the rainy season carry their eegs, larvae and juvenile fish to the floodplain area including tonle sap and the delta, providing vast area for the growing fish. Upto 75 % of the fish catch in the Tonle Sap depends on fish that migrate to the deep pools from Kratie to Siphandone for dry season home.\n\nHou Sahong, the most important bottlenecks for dry season fish migrations or the most important channel of laos \nThe fisheris of Siphandone are threatened by sustainable fishing, and some fishing practices in siphandone area contributing to the declineof important species. The fishermen cleverly exploit the natural features of the river that funnel large fish migrations through narrow areas where large numbers are caught with Li traps as well as nets and other gear. The beautiful photographs \n\nDams and reservoirs block natural fish migration routes, dams also alter the amount, timing an sseed of flow of rivers, the river’s natural patterns of erosion and silt deposition; as well as water temperature and water quality \n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Brainstorm Race
    • 2. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?
    • 3. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?Work with your group from yesterday
    • 4. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?Work with your group from yesterdayBrainstorm what you’ve learnt about the Mekong
    • 5. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?Work with your group from yesterdayBrainstorm what you’ve learnt about the MekongYou’ve got 4 minutes so DO it as fast as you can
    • 6. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?Work with your group from yesterdayBrainstorm what you’ve learnt about the MekongYou’ve got 4 minutes so DO it as fast as you canNO TALKING!!!!!!!
    • 7. Brainstorm RaceWhat do you remember in your last lesson?Work with your group from yesterdayBrainstorm what you’ve learnt about the MekongYou’ve got 4 minutes so DO it as fast as you canNO TALKING!!!!!!!Then present it to the class
    • 8. Transnational Cooperation
    • 9. • Established in 1995 between Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam• Assist in management and use of the Mekong• The only inter-governmental agency working with government of each country• Joint management of shared water resources & sustainable development
    • 10. • Established in 1995 between Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam• Assist in management and use of the Mekong• The only inter-governmental agency working with government of each country• Joint management of shared water resources & sustainable development
    • 11. • Established in 1995 between Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam• Assist in management and use of the Mekong• The only inter-governmental agency working with government of each country• Joint management of shared water resources & sustainable development
    • 12. Mekong Under Threat •Granted approval to investigate 11 dams on the Mekong •11 dams are claimed to harm river’s ecology •Block fish migration •Loss of local people’s income
    • 13. Mekong Mainstream Dam Plans
    • 14. Mekong Mainstream Dam Plans
    • 15. Mekong Mainstream Dam Plans7 dams in Laos2 dams in Cambodia2 dams on Thai-Lao bordersOver 14,000 megawatts ofelectricitySent to Thailand and Vietnam
    • 16. Don Sahong Dam July 2009, 9 dams were at feasibility stage Don Sahong and Xayaburi Dam were at detailed design stage (2013 and 2020) Don Sahong Dam will block fish migration
    • 17. Don Sahong Dam July 2009, 9 dams were at feasibility stage Don Sahong and Xayaburi Dam were at detailed design stage (2013 and 2020) Don Sahong Dam will block fish migration
    • 18. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 19. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 20. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 21. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 22. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 23. Siphandone Characterized by numerous islands, wide river with deep pools, narrow channels, rapid, small islets Migratory species move upriver to deep pools in Siphandone area Up to 75% of Tonle Sap fish migrate to Siphandone during dry season
    • 24. Video Clip: Save the Mekong http://youtu.be/ZhdHvPfKkoA
    • 25. Don Sahong Damhttp://youtu.be/ZhdHvPfKkoA
    • 26. Summarize from the Clip
    • 27. Answer the questions
    • 28. Dam or No Dam?Brainstorming on....What are positive aspectsof dam?What are negative aspectsof dam?
    • 29. Referenceshttp://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTEASTASIAPACIFIC/Resources/226262-1151703454492/Mekong_MWRAS_hydromap.gif http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5039980 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:TonleSapMap.png http://www.mrcmekong.org/about-the-mrc/ http://images.smh.com.au/2010/06/25/1644221/Mekong-Fishing-net-420x0.jpg http://www.laos-guide-999.com/vientiane-boat-racing-festival.html http://tonlesap.net/ http://maps.grida.no/go/graphic/the-mekong-river-survival-for-millionshttp://www.reuters.com/resources/r/?m=02&d=20070307&t=2&i=444980&w=460&fh=&fw=&ll=&pl=&r=444980 http://thailand.prd.go.th/thailand_illustrated/content.php?s_id=287 http://www.parish-without-borders.net/cditt/cambodia/culture/waterfest2.htm http://www.srisiamholidays.com/images/stories/Cambodia/Maps/cambodia%20wetland.gif http://www.google.com/imgres?q=Mekong+River +fisherman&um=1&hl=th&client=safari&sa=N&rls=en&biw=1020&bih=635&tbm=isch&tbnid=dmA2_xSjN7FijM:&im grefurl=http://www.britannica.com/bps/media-view/92881/1/0/0&docid=oAm2SyrwTYRwNM&imgurl=http:// media-3.web.britannica.com/eb-media// 21/93121-050-878F4D70.jpg&w=1600&h=1097&ei=6_m_TvHJMonLrQfv9IW_AQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=710&vpy=3 06&dur=2164&hovh=186&hovw=271&tx=174&ty=97&sig=106310772108964024319&page=1&tbnh=135&tbnw=153 &start=0&ndsp=13&ved=1t:429,r:8,s:0 http://www.cambodiancommunityday.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=63&Itemid=80