Islam of malaysia

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  • Terengganu (formerly spelled Trengganu or Tringganu) is a sultanate and constitutive state of federal Malaysia.\n
  • Emphasize that this list should be words or descriptions that other people, whether from the United States or not, would use to label them. They might start by listing terms other students have named them and then branch out to think of ways others in the world might characterize Americans. Have each student share her list with a partner. \n\n
  • Look at this map and \nexplain to students that although many Middle Eastern states have many Muslims, Islam is practiced worldwide. In fact, the largest population of Muslims is in Indonesia, and Islam is the majority religion in Malaysia. Explain that this lesson will be about Malaysia and the various religions within it, particularly Islam. First, explain the following to students: \n\n
  • Look at this map and \nexplain to students that although many Middle Eastern states have many Muslims, Islam is practiced worldwide. In fact, the largest population of Muslims is in Indonesia, and Islam is the majority religion in Malaysia. Explain that this lesson will be about Malaysia and the various religions within it, particularly Islam. First, explain the following to students: \n\n
  • Look at this map and \nexplain to students that although many Middle Eastern states have many Muslims, Islam is practiced worldwide. In fact, the largest population of Muslims is in Indonesia, and Islam is the majority religion in Malaysia. Explain that this lesson will be about Malaysia and the various religions within it, particularly Islam. First, explain the following to students: \n\n
  • Look at this map and \nexplain to students that although many Middle Eastern states have many Muslims, Islam is practiced worldwide. In fact, the largest population of Muslims is in Indonesia, and Islam is the majority religion in Malaysia. Explain that this lesson will be about Malaysia and the various religions within it, particularly Islam. First, explain the following to students: \n\n
  • Look at this map and \nexplain to students that although many Middle Eastern states have many Muslims, Islam is practiced worldwide. In fact, the largest population of Muslims is in Indonesia, and Islam is the majority religion in Malaysia. Explain that this lesson will be about Malaysia and the various religions within it, particularly Islam. First, explain the following to students: \n\n
  • All of the world's major religions have substantial representation in Malaysia, the main adherents of each largely reflecting the multi-ethnic character of the population. The variety of religions found in Malaysia is a direct reflection of the diversity of races living there. Although Islam is the state religion of Malaysia, freedom of religion is guaranteed. The Malays are almost all Muslims. The Chinese embrace an eclectic brew of Taoism, Buddhism and ancestor worship, though some are Christians. Although Christianity has made no great inroads into Peninsular Malaysia it has had a much greater impact upon East Malaysia, where many indigenous people have converted to Christianity , although others still follow their animist traditions. \n
  • Ask Students if anyone has been to Malaysia, what’s it like? have the person explain \nMalaysia is a majority Muslim country, with 40% of the population. However, under the constitution the 40% of the population who are non-Muslims have the right to worship as they will.\nMalaysia is a traditionally conformist society, which means people follow the expectation on how to behave and socialized. It also means that political debate is not encouraged. The country has been criticized for continuing to use colonial era security laws which allow for detention without trial or charge. This means police can imprison or hold someone against their will and do not have to give reasons. \nThe Internal Security Act an act enforced since 1960 is a preventive detention law enforced in Malaysia which allows indefinite detention without trial for 2 years and further extension as needed.\n
  • Malaysia was ruled for over two decades by the authoritarian but pragmatic Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, under whom Malaysia became the world's most industrialized Muslim country. Mahathir's successor, Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi, had started to make government more open.\nBadawi has also promoted "Islam Hadhari" ("Civilisational Islam"), which stresses the importance of education and science going back to the great Islamic civilizations of a thousand years ago.\nThe current Prime Minister of Malaysia is currently Mr. Najib Razak who has claimed that he will have a more transparent government and increase basic freedoms for Malaysians.\n\n
  • Malaysia was ruled for over two decades by the authoritarian but pragmatic Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, under whom Malaysia became the world's most industrialized Muslim country. Mahathir's successor, Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi, had started to make government more open.\nBadawi has also promoted "Islam Hadhari" ("Civilisational Islam"), which stresses the importance of education and science going back to the great Islamic civilizations of a thousand years ago.\nThe current Prime Minister of Malaysia is currently Mr. Najib Razak who has claimed that he will have a more transparent government and increase basic freedoms for Malaysians.\n\n
  • Malaysia was ruled for over two decades by the authoritarian but pragmatic Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, under whom Malaysia became the world's most industrialized Muslim country. Mahathir's successor, Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi, had started to make government more open.\nBadawi has also promoted "Islam Hadhari" ("Civilisational Islam"), which stresses the importance of education and science going back to the great Islamic civilizations of a thousand years ago.\nThe current Prime Minister of Malaysia is currently Mr. Najib Razak who has claimed that he will have a more transparent government and increase basic freedoms for Malaysians.\n\n
  • Malaysia is also home to one of the most radical reforming groups in the Muslim world, "Sisters in Islam", who are calling for an end to polygamy and for women to be allowed to become Sharia judges.\nSharia Law is a religious law system separated from the civil legal system, only applies to a citizen who are Muslims.\nMalaysia boasts one of south-east Asia's most vibrant economies, the results of decades of industrial growth.\nIts multi-ethnic, multi-religious society encompasses a majority Muslim population in most of its states and an economically-powerful Chinese community.\n
  • Malaysia consists of two regions separated by some 640 miles of the South China Sea. \nIt is a federation of 13 states and three federal territories. It is one of the region's key tourist destinations, offering excellent beaches and brilliant scenery. Dense rainforests in the eastern states of Sarawak and Sabah, on the island of Borneo, are a refuge for wildlife and tribal traditions.\nEthnic Malays comprise some 60% of the population. Chinese constitute around 26%; Indians and indigenous peoples make up the rest. The communities coexist in relative harmony with little racial interaction.\nIban Dance\nThe origin of this indigenous dance is not clearly known but it is believed to have been in existence along with the Iban tribe since the 16th Century. The Ngajat dance is believed to have been performed by warriors on their return from battles.\n
  • Malaysia consists of two regions separated by some 640 miles of the South China Sea. \nIt is a federation of 13 states and three federal territories. It is one of the region's key tourist destinations, offering excellent beaches and brilliant scenery. Dense rainforests in the eastern states of Sarawak and Sabah, on the island of Borneo, are a refuge for wildlife and tribal traditions.\nEthnic Malays comprise some 60% of the population. Chinese constitute around 26%; Indians and indigenous peoples make up the rest. The communities coexist in relative harmony with little racial interaction.\nIban Dance\nThe origin of this indigenous dance is not clearly known but it is believed to have been in existence along with the Iban tribe since the 16th Century. The Ngajat dance is believed to have been performed by warriors on their return from battles.\n
  • Malaysia consists of two regions separated by some 640 miles of the South China Sea. \nIt is a federation of 13 states and three federal territories. It is one of the region's key tourist destinations, offering excellent beaches and brilliant scenery. Dense rainforests in the eastern states of Sarawak and Sabah, on the island of Borneo, are a refuge for wildlife and tribal traditions.\nEthnic Malays comprise some 60% of the population. Chinese constitute around 26%; Indians and indigenous peoples make up the rest. The communities coexist in relative harmony with little racial interaction.\nIban Dance\nThe origin of this indigenous dance is not clearly known but it is believed to have been in existence along with the Iban tribe since the 16th Century. The Ngajat dance is believed to have been performed by warriors on their return from battles.\n
  • Although since 1971 Malays have benefited from positive discrimination in business, education and the civil service, ethnic Chinese continue to hold economic power and are the wealthiest community. The Malays remain the dominant group in politics while the Indians are among the poorest economically and politically. \n\nThe indigenous people, particularly those in the states and territories in Borneo are the most marginalized. They live in a society that is marginalized socially, politically and economically. \n\nMalaysia's economic prospects remain healthy, although it faces fierce competition from its neighbors, and from China and India. \n\n
  • Although since 1971 Malays have benefited from positive discrimination in business, education and the civil service, ethnic Chinese continue to hold economic power and are the wealthiest community. The Malays remain the dominant group in politics while the Indians are among the poorest economically and politically. \n\nThe indigenous people, particularly those in the states and territories in Borneo are the most marginalized. They live in a society that is marginalized socially, politically and economically. \n\nMalaysia's economic prospects remain healthy, although it faces fierce competition from its neighbors, and from China and India. \n\n
  • The country is among the world's biggest producers of computer disk drives, palm oil, rubber and timber. It has a state-owned car maker, Proton, and tourism has considerable room for expansion.\n\n
  • But it also faces serious challenges - politically, in the form of sustaining stability in the face of religious differences and the ethnic wealth gap, and, environmentally, in preserving its valuable forests.\nMalaysia's human rights record has come in for international criticism. Internal security laws allow suspects to be detained without charge or trial.\n\n
  • But it also faces serious challenges - politically, in the form of sustaining stability in the face of religious differences and the ethnic wealth gap, and, environmentally, in preserving its valuable forests.\nMalaysia's human rights record has come in for international criticism. Internal security laws allow suspects to be detained without charge or trial.\n\n
  • Full name: Federation of Malaysiao Population: 25.3 million (UN, 2005)o Capital: Kuala Lumpuro Area: 329,847 sq km (127,355 sq miles)o Major languages: Malay (official), English, Chinese dialects, Tamil,\nTelugu, Malayalamo Major religions: Islam, Buddhism, Taoism, Hinduism, Christianity,\nSikhismo Life expectancy: 71 years (men), 75 years (women)o Monetary unit: 1 ringgit = 100 seno Main exports: Electronic equipment, petroleum and liquefied natural\ngas, chemicals, palm oil, wood and wood products, rubber, textiles o GNI per capita: US $4,960 (World Bank, 2006)o Internet domain: .my\n\n
  • (20 minutes) Divide students into five groups and explain that each will be responsible for learning a bit about a different major religion in Malaysia. Give each group a different religion and provide it with a handout that briefly describes how that religion is practiced in Malaysia (See Appendix 3). After giving each group about 8 minutes to study its assigned religion, have a spokesperson for each group share some of the basic facts about that religion and how it came to be practiced in Malaysia. \n\n\n
  • (20 minutes) Divide students into five groups and explain that each will be responsible for learning a bit about a different major religion in Malaysia. Give each group a different religion and provide it with a handout that briefly describes how that religion is practiced in Malaysia (See Appendix 3). After giving each group about 8 minutes to study its assigned religion, have a spokesperson for each group share some of the basic facts about that religion and how it came to be practiced in Malaysia. \n\n\n
  • (20 minutes) Divide students into five groups and explain that each will be responsible for learning a bit about a different major religion in Malaysia. Give each group a different religion and provide it with a handout that briefly describes how that religion is practiced in Malaysia (See Appendix 3). After giving each group about 8 minutes to study its assigned religion, have a spokesperson for each group share some of the basic facts about that religion and how it came to be practiced in Malaysia. \n\n\n
  • The name of this religion, Islam, is derived from the Arabic word "salam," which is often interpreted as meaning "peace." However "submission" would be a better translation. A Muslim is a follower of Islam. "Muslim" is an Arabic word that refers to a person who submits themselves to the will of God. Many Muslims are offended by the phrases "Islamic terrorist" or "Muslim terrorist," which have been observed so often in the media; they are viewed as oxymorons.\n\n
  • Most religious historians view Islam as having been founded in 622 CE by Muhammad the Prophet (peace be upon him).* He lived from about 570 to 632 CE). The religion started in Mecca, when the angel Jibril (a.k.a. Jibreel; Gabriel in English) read the first revelation to Muhammad. Islam is the youngest of the world's very large religions -- each with over 300 million members -- which include Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.\nAl-Masjid al-Haram ("The Holy Mosque"; also known as al-Haram Mosque, Haram al-Sharif, Masjid al-Sharif and the Haram) in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is the holiest mosque in the world and the primary destination of the Hajj pilgrimage.\n\n
  • Believers are currently concentrated from the West coast of Africa to the Philippines. In Africa, in particular, they are increasing in numbers, largely at the expense of Christianity.\nMany do not look upon Islam as a new religion. Muslims believe Jesus was a prophet, and thus, many believe Islam to be an extension of other religions that came before (Judaism and Christianity). Muslims believe Mohammed was the last prophet to impart God’s teachings and helped clarify and solidify the religion for his followers.\n\n
  • Ask students the following questions: What are the ways in which people practice religion? What do people do to show their faith? Make a list on the board of ways in which people show their faith. (For example, students might mention praying, attending services, creating altars, reading holy books, performing rites and rituals)\n\n
  • Ask students the following questions: What are the ways in which people practice religion? What do people do to show their faith? Make a list on the board of ways in which people show their faith. (For example, students might mention praying, attending services, creating altars, reading holy books, performing rites and rituals)\n\n
  • The 'Five Pillars' of Islam are the foundation of Muslim life. Shahadah is a Islamic saying to accept Muhammad as god’s messenger which Muslims recite at least once during their lifetime. But most Muslims repeat it every day. \nSalat is the name for the obligatory prayers that are performed five times a day\n
  • The 'Five Pillars' of Islam are the foundation of Muslim life. Shahadah is a Islamic saying to accept Muhammad as god’s messenger which Muslims recite at least once during their lifetime. But most Muslims repeat it every day. \nSalat is the name for the obligatory prayers that are performed five times a day\n
  • Zakat or alms-giving is the practice of charitable giving by Muslims based on accumulated wealth, and is obligatory for all who are able to do so. It is considered to be a personal responsibility for Muslims to ease economic hardship for others and eliminate inequality.\nRitual fasting is an obligatory act during the month of Ramadan.[16] Muslims must abstain from food, drink, and sexual intercourse from dawn to dusk during this month, and are to be especially mindful of other sins.[16] Fasting is necessary for every Muslim that has reached puberty.\nThe Hajj is a pilgrimage that occurs during the Islamic month of Dhu al-Hijjah to the holy city of Mecca. Every able-bodied Muslim is obliged to make the pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in their lifetime if he or she can afford it.\n
  • there is a difference between Islam and Muslim culture. Explain that Muslims in various countries have their own cultural traditions, which can be clearly seen as the forms of dress. Show students pictures of various types of Islamic dress, each of which have examples in Malaysia\nBurka = a full body cloak worn by some Muslims\nHijab\nClockwise from top left: Muslim women wearing burqas in Afghanistan, Muslim Malaysians wearing a hijab and a veil, Muslim Malaysians wearing only the hijab, and another variation of the hijab in the United States.\n\n
  • there is a difference between Islam and Muslim culture. Explain that Muslims in various countries have their own cultural traditions, which can be clearly seen as the forms of dress. Show students pictures of various types of Islamic dress, each of which have examples in Malaysia\nBurka = a full body cloak worn by some Muslims\nHijab\nClockwise from top left: Muslim women wearing burqas in Afghanistan, Muslim Malaysians wearing a hijab and a veil, Muslim Malaysians wearing only the hijab, and another variation of the hijab in the United States.\n\n
  • there is a difference between Islam and Muslim culture. Explain that Muslims in various countries have their own cultural traditions, which can be clearly seen as the forms of dress. Show students pictures of various types of Islamic dress, each of which have examples in Malaysia\nBurka = a full body cloak worn by some Muslims\nHijab\nClockwise from top left: Muslim women wearing burqas in Afghanistan, Muslim Malaysians wearing a hijab and a veil, Muslim Malaysians wearing only the hijab, and another variation of the hijab in the United States.\n\n
  • there is a difference between Islam and Muslim culture. Explain that Muslims in various countries have their own cultural traditions, which can be clearly seen as the forms of dress. Show students pictures of various types of Islamic dress, each of which have examples in Malaysia\nBurka = a full body cloak worn by some Muslims\nHijab\nClockwise from top left: Muslim women wearing burqas in Afghanistan, Muslim Malaysians wearing a hijab and a veil, Muslim Malaysians wearing only the hijab, and another variation of the hijab in the United States.\n\n
  • 60 % of Malaysian practice Islam. \nIntroduce the group Sisters in Islam as a group of Muslim women, based in Malaysia, who fight legal battles on behalf of women and who advocate women’s rights through a contextual interpretation of the Koran and other holy scriptures. Explain that because of this group, Malaysia is known to have some of the most progressive Muslim women in the world. These are the organization’s objectives (For more information, follow this link: http://www.sistersinislam.org.my/):\no To promote and develop a framework of women's rights in Islam, which takes into consideration women's experiences and realities;\no To eliminate injustice and discrimination against women by changing practices and values that regard women as inferior to men;\no To create public awareness, and reform laws and policies, on issues of equality, justice, freedom, dignity and democracy in Islam.\n\n
  • Zainah Anwar, Executive Director of Sisters in Islam (SIS), works on the rights of Muslim women within the framework of Islam to end discrimination against women in the name of religion while upholding the principles of justice, equality, freedom and dignity within a democratic state.In this short interview (four minutes), she tells Global X the story of a woman who spent over seven years out of an eight-year marriage to try to get a divorce from her violent husband, even though he had already remarried and had children with his new wife.Zainah Anwar, an optimist, hopes that her current work will become irrelevant in the next 10 years. She knows that the laws that Malaysia has inherited from the British need to be adapted to the new realties that women are now facing. She is convinced that "justice will prevail, because the realities of our lives are totally different from when these laws were first conceptualized."\n
  • Lead the class in a discussion based on the first video clip:o What kinds of challenges are Muslim women facing in Malaysia?o What kinds of challenges do women face in other cultures?o What kinds of challenges do men face in other cultures?o Aida is waging a legal battle to change the way the court interprets the Koran. What are some ways in which people interpret other holy works differently?\n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Now explain to the class that you will explore Islam in more depth, as it is practiced by the largest group of Malaysians. Share with students a brief background of how Islam came into existence (See Appendix 4). Tell students that the word “Islam” translates to “peace.” Ask students how Islam relates to other religions. Be sure that students understand that Muslims believe Jesus was a prophet, and thus, many believe Islam to be an extension of other religions that came before (Judaism and Christianity). Explain that Muslims believe Mohammed was the last prophet to impart God’s teachings and helped clarify and solidify the religion for his followers.\n\n
  • Islam of malaysia

    1. 1. Islam of MalaysiaThe Diversity of RacesDate December 13, 2011
    2. 2. Brainstorming
    3. 3. Brainstorming✤ Write down any words you can think of that ‘others’ would use to describe ‘Muslims’✤ Work with your partner
    4. 4. The World of Islam
    5. 5. The World of Islam✤ What can you tell about Muslim population distribution?
    6. 6. The World of Islam✤ What can you tell about Muslim population distribution?✤ Practiced Worldwide
    7. 7. The World of Islam✤ What can you tell about Muslim population distribution?✤ Practiced Worldwide✤ The largest population is in Indonesia
    8. 8. The World of Islam✤ What can you tell about Muslim population distribution?✤ Practiced Worldwide✤ The largest population is in Indonesia✤ Majority religion in Malaysia
    9. 9. The World of Islam✤ What can you tell about Muslim population distribution?✤ Practiced Worldwide✤ The largest population is in Indonesia✤ Majority religion in Malaysia✤ Various religions of Malaysia
    10. 10. Multi-Religious Community
    11. 11. Multi-Religious Community✤ All of world’s major religions are found in Malaysia✤ Reflecting in multi-ethnic community✤ Islam is state religion, freedom of religion✤ The Malays are nearly all Muslims✤ The Chinese = Taoism, Buddhism, ancestor warship, some Christianity✤ Christianity = East Malaysia✤ Indigenous = Christianity or Animism
    12. 12. Overview of Malaysia
    13. 13. Overview of Malaysia✤ A majority Muslim country (60%)✤ 40 % is free to worship any religion✤ Traditionally conformist society- no political debate✤ Being criticized for detention without trial or charge
    14. 14. The Prime Ministers
    15. 15. The Prime Ministers ✤ Ruled by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad for over 2 decades ✤ Became the world’s most industrialized Muslim country ✤ Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi- make the government more open ✤ PM Badawi promoted ‘Islam Hadhari” ✤ ‘Civilizational Islam’ Education and Science ✤ PM Najib Razak - transparent government and more freedoms
    16. 16. The Prime Ministers ✤ Ruled by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad for over 2 decades ✤ Became the world’s most industrialized Muslim country ✤ Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi- make the government more open ✤ PM Badawi promoted ‘Islam Hadhari” ✤ ‘Civilizational Islam’ Education and Science ✤ PM Najib Razak - transparent government and more freedoms
    17. 17. The Prime Ministers ✤ Ruled by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad for over 2 decades ✤ Became the world’s most industrialized Muslim country ✤ Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi- make the government more open ✤ PM Badawi promoted ‘Islam Hadhari” ✤ ‘Civilizational Islam’ Education and Science ✤ PM Najib Razak - transparent government and more freedoms
    18. 18. Active Citizens
    19. 19. Active Citizens✤ Home to radical reforming group✤ ‘Sisters in Islam’✤ End to polygamy and allow women to become Sharia judges✤ One of SEA’s vibrant economies, industrial growth✤ Multi-ethnic, multi-religious society includes Muslims in most states and the Chinese community
    20. 20. Social Geography of Malaysia
    21. 21. Social Geography of Malaysia✤ 2 regions✤ A federation of 13 states and three federal territories✤ Rainforests in eastern Sarawak, Sabah, Borneo = refugee for wildlife, tribal tradition✤ 60% ethnic Malay, 26% Chinese, Indians & Indigenous people
    22. 22. Social Geography of Malaysia✤ 2 regions✤ A federation of 13 states and three federal territories✤ Rainforests in eastern Sarawak, Sabah, Borneo = refugee for wildlife, tribal tradition✤ 60% ethnic Malay, 26% Chinese, Indians & Indigenous people
    23. 23. Social Geography of Malaysia✤ 2 regions✤ A federation of 13 states and three federal territories✤ Rainforests in eastern Sarawak, Sabah, Borneo = refugee for wildlife, tribal tradition✤ 60% ethnic Malay, 26% Chinese, Indians & Indigenous people
    24. 24. Active Discrimination
    25. 25. Active Discrimination✤ Discrimination in business, education, civil service, etc. in favor of ethnic Malays since 1971✤ Chinese hold economic power✤ Indians-the poorest economically and politically✤ The indigenous are the most marginalized people✤ Good economic prospects
    26. 26. Active Discrimination✤ Discrimination in business, education, civil service, etc. in favor of ethnic Malays since 1971✤ Chinese hold economic power✤ Indians-the poorest economically and politically✤ The indigenous are the most marginalized people✤ Good economic prospects
    27. 27. Industry
    28. 28. Industry✤ The world’s biggest producers of computer disc drives, palm oil, rubber, timber✤ State-owned car maker, ‘Proton’✤ Tourism
    29. 29. Serious Challenges
    30. 30. Serious Challenges✤ Internal ✤ religious differences, ✤ ethnic wealth gap ✤ economy vs. conservation
    31. 31. Serious Challenges✤ Internal ✤ religious differences, ✤ ethnic wealth gap ✤ economy vs. conservation✤ External ✤ international criticism of human rights
    32. 32. Homework: Country Profile
    33. 33. Homework: Country Profile✤ Complete Malaysia’s country profile in your study guide using this website✤ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/ asia-pacific/country_profiles/ 1304569.stm
    34. 34. Group Work
    35. 35. Group Work✤ 5 groups, each group will learn about a different major religion in Malaysia
    36. 36. Group Work✤ 5 groups, each group will learn about a different major religion in Malaysia✤ 8 minutes to study
    37. 37. Group Work✤ 5 groups, each group will learn about a different major religion in Malaysia✤ 8 minutes to study✤ a spokesperson to share basic facts, how it came to be practiced in Malaysia
    38. 38. Origin of Islam
    39. 39. Origin of Islam✤ Islam derived from Arabic word ‘salam’ = peace, submission✤ Muslim, a follower of Islam✤ Muslim, a person who submits themselves to the will of God✤ Offended by ‘Islamic terrorist’ or ‘Muslim terrorist’
    40. 40. Founding of Islam http://www.sacred-destinations.com/saudi-arabia/mecca- mosque-photos/slides/mosque-night2-c-sacredsites
    41. 41. Founding of Islam✤ founded in 622 CE✤ Muhammad, a messenger or a Prophet of God✤ lived from about 570-632 CE.✤ Started in Mecca, Angel Gabriel read the first revelation to him✤ The youngest of the world’s large religions (Christianity, Islam, http://www.sacred-destinations.com/saudi-arabia/mecca- mosque-photos/slides/mosque-night2-c-sacredsites Hinduism, Buddhism)
    42. 42. The Believers
    43. 43. The Believers✤ Concentrated from west Africa to the Philippines✤ Not a new religion for many people✤ Considered it had been taught by ancient Prophets, including Abraham, David, Moses and Jesus.✤ Extension of Judaism, Christianity✤ Muhammad was the last prophet to impart God’s teaching
    44. 44. Practicing Religion
    45. 45. Practicing Religion✤ What are the ways in which people practice religions?✤ What do people do to show their faith?
    46. 46. Practicing Religion ✤ Praying✤ What are the ways in which ✤ Attending services people practice religions? ✤ Reading books✤ What do people do to show their faith? ✤ Creating altars, amulets ✤ Performing rites and rituals
    47. 47. Five Pillars of Islam and Practices
    48. 48. Five Pillars of Islam and Practices ✤ Shahadah ✤ a saying to accept Muhammad as God’s messenger ✤ recite at least once during their lifetime ✤ most repeat it daily
    49. 49. Five Pillars of Islam and Practices ✤ Shahadah ✤ a saying to accept Muhammad as God’s messenger ✤ recite at least once during their lifetime ✤ most repeat it daily ✤ Salat (the Islamic prayer) ✤ 5 times a day ✤ morning, noon, afternoon, sunset, night
    50. 50. Five Pillars of Islam and Practices
    51. 51. Five Pillars of Islam and Practices✤ Zakat (alms-giving) ✤ donate regularly to charity✤ Ramadan ✤ fast during the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, last 11-12 day ✤ refrain from eating, drinking, smoking, and sex from dawn to dusk✤ Hajj ✤ one pilgrimage to Mecca
    52. 52. Islam and Muslim Culture http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/aug/02/islam-women-dress-qur-an
    53. 53. Islam and Muslim Culture http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/aug/02/islam-women-dress-qur-an
    54. 54. Islam and Muslim Culture http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/aug/02/islam-women-dress-qur-an
    55. 55. Islam and Muslim Culture http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/aug/02/islam-women-dress-qur-an
    56. 56. Islam and Muslim Culture ✤ Burka- full body cloak ✤ Hijab- head scarf ✤ Veil http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/aug/02/islam-women-dress-qur-an
    57. 57. Sisters in Islam
    58. 58. Sisters in Islam ✤ group of Muslim women, based in Malaysia ✤ The most progressive Muslim women’s group in the world ✤ Promote and develop a framework of women’s rights in Islam ✤ Eliminate injustice and discrimination against woman ✤ Create public awareness, reform laws and policies (equality, justice, freedom, dignity, democracy)
    59. 59. Video Clip: Interviewing founder of SIS ✤ Zainah Anwar, Executive Director of Sisters in Islam (SIS) ✤ Work to end discrimination against women
    60. 60. Discussion✤ What kinds of challenges are Muslim women facing in Malaysia?✤ What kinds of challenges do woman face in other cultures?✤ What kinds of challenges do men face in other cultures?
    61. 61. Zainah Anwar Video Clip ✤ What is Zainah Anwar educational background? ✤ How did her interest in woman’s right start? ✤ What was Zainah’s feeling towards her father? ✤ What did Zainah and SIS do to help Muslim women? ✤ Why do Muslim women in other parts of the world think of Zainah as their Allah? ✤ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3WgVhIEwTA
    62. 62. Assignment ✤ A 500 word reflection on inequality of woman in Muslim world and Sisters in Islam ✤ Due on Sunday by 8 pm.
    63. 63. References✤ http://www.gng.org/CURRENTS07/teachers/Malaysia_curriculum.pdf✤ http://www.sistersinislam.org.my/✤ http://advocateviews.blogspot.com/2009/11/mahathir-living-monument- of-shame.html✤ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/malaysia/3159108/ Malaysian-PM-Abdullah-Badawi-to-resign.html✤

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