Festivals of sea

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  • happiness spiritual festive \n
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  • The Mooncake festival, or Mid-autumn festival is a popular lunar harvest festival celebrated by Chinese in many parts of the world, including the Southeast Asian region. It is held on the 15th day of the 8th month in Chinese calendar which usually falls in October and September. \n
  • \nMany activities and traditional customs are held on that day. It is an occasion for families to reunite under the full moon - a symbol of happiness and prosperity. They also exchange traditional pastries known as moon cakes. Mooncake is a Chinese bakery product traditionally eaten during this festival. \nEating mooncakes.\nMatchmaking. In some parts of China, dances are held for young men and women to find partners. "One by one, young women are encouraged to throw their handkerchiefs to the crowd. The young man who catches and returns the handkerchief has a chance of romance.\nCarrying brightly lit lanterns, lighting lanterns on towers, floating sky lanterns.\nIn Vietnam \n\n\n
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  • Mooncake is round and carved with words and patterns, filled with various kinds of filling, sweet, salty, \n
  • One important event before and during the Vietnamese Mid-Autumn Festival are lion dances. Dances are performed by both non-professional children's groups and trained professional groups. Lion dance groups perform on the streets, going to houses asking for permission to perform for them. If the host consents, the "lion" will come in and start dancing as a blessing of luck and fortune for the home. In return, the host gives luck money to show their gratitude.\n
  • Lion Dance competition has evolved a lot since the early days when it was performed as a skill part of martial arts of Wushu and it grew into a more artistic arts and skill which takes into account the lion's expression and the natural movements with acrobatic styles and skills during performances.\nMost of the lion dance world championships were held in Malaysia with its troupes winning most if not all of the championships.\n
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  • There are many feasts and festivals in Thailand but one of the most striking striking festivals is the ‘Water Festival’ because it is the time of family reunion, of entertainment and festivities. Water festival is widely observed not only in Thailand but also other Southeast Asian nations. \n
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  • Water Festival is the New Year's celebrations that take place in Southeast Asian countries such as Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand as well as Yunnan, China. It is called the 'Water Festival' by Westerners because people pour water at one another as part of the cleansing ritual to welcome the new year. Traditionally people gently sprinkled water on one another as a sign of respect, but as the new year falls during the hottest month in South East Asia, many people end up dousing strangers and passersby in vehicles in boisterous celebration. The act of pouring water is also a show of blessings and good wishes.\n
  • \nThe festival has many different names specific to each country, such as Songkran in Thailand and Pi-Mai Lao in Laos (translates as "New Year"), Chaul Chnam Thmey in Cambodia, and Thingyan in Myanmar. \n
  • Songkran is a Sanskrit word in Thai form which means a passing or a movement of the sun into a new astrological cycle. Thailand, Laos, Myanmar and Cambodia adopted this tradition from the ancient Brahmins, or members of the Hindu faith. They believe that the sun re-entered Aries and finished its orbit round the earth on April 13. Therefore, April 13th is the traditional Thai New Year's Day, which is celebrated by all Thai people throughout the entire country. \n \n
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  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • Songkran was traditionally a time to visit and pay respects to elders, including family members, friends, neighbors, and monks. Many people celebrating Songkran as a Buddhist festival may also go to a wat or temple to pray and offer food to monks. They may also cleanse Buddha images from their household shrines as well as Buddha images at monasteries by gently pouring water mixed with a Thai fragrance over them. It is believed that doing this will bring good luck and prosperity for the New Year. Many younger Thais would pay respect to their elders by pouring scented water on their hands and in turn the elders would bless the a good fortune. \nIn northern Thailand, people may carry handfuls of sand to a nearby temple in order to recompense the dirt that they have carried away on their feet during the rest of the year.\n\n
  • The sand is then sculpted into stupa-shaped piles and decorated with colorful flags and flowers. When they were sculpting the pile, they would take the opportunity to chat with others which is like a date. \nPeople also make merit by releasing fish into water and bird into the sky, giving life to others. \nApril 13 is recognized the ‘National Elderly day’ of Thailand and April 14 is the National Family Day. Thai government encourage Thai people to visit their hometown and be with family member. \n\n\n
  • The sand is then sculpted into stupa-shaped piles and decorated with colorful flags and flowers. When they were sculpting the pile, they would take the opportunity to chat with others which is like a date. \nPeople also make merit by releasing fish into water and bird into the sky, giving life to others. \nApril 13 is recognized the ‘National Elderly day’ of Thailand and April 14 is the National Family Day. Thai government encourage Thai people to visit their hometown and be with family member. \n\n\n
  • รีรีข้าวสาร สองทะนานข้าวเปลือก\nเด็กน้อยตาเหลือก เลือกท้องใบลาน\nคดข้าวใส่จาน คอยพานคนข้างหลังไว\n
  • รีรีข้าวสาร สองทะนานข้าวเปลือก\nเด็กน้อยตาเหลือก เลือกท้องใบลาน\nคดข้าวใส่จาน คอยพานคนข้างหลังไว\n
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  • มอญซ่อนผ้า Leak Kanseng\n"มอญซ่อนผ้า ตุ๊กตาอยู่ข้างหลัง ไว้โน่นไว้นี่ ฉันจะตีก้นเธอ"\n\n
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  • Kadayawan festival is celebrated as a way of thanks giving for the bountiful harvest. It is also a way to honor the tribes of Davao.\n
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  • Festivals of sea

    1. 1. FESTIVALS of Southeast Asia
    2. 2. PHOTO ANALYSIS• Look at the photo and answer the following questions.• Make notes in your study guide.
    3. 3. GUIDING QUESTIONS What do you see in the photos? In which SEA countries were the photos taken? What types of festival do these images and impressions represent? What themes or concepts do these images symbolize?
    4. 4. GUIDING QUESTIONSWhat do you see in the photos?In which SEA countries were thephotos taken?What types of festival do theseimages and impressionsrepresent?What themes or concepts dothese images symbolize?
    5. 5. MOONCAKE FESTIVALZhong Qiu JieMid Autumn FestivalChinese Communities in Singapore,Malaysia, the Philippines,Indonesia, Thailand, VietnamHeld on the 15th day of the 8thmonth in Chinese calendarSeptember/ October
    6. 6. TRADITIONAL CUSTOMSFamily ReunionEating mooncakesCarrying, lighting, floatinglanternsLion Dance in Vietnam
    7. 7. WATCHING VIDEO CLIPSMid-Autumn Festivalhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyZAWq5Qnxc&feature=relatedThe Moon Festivalhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieTVPrKFHjM&feature=player_embedded#!
    8. 8. QUESTIONSWhat does the full moon representaccording to the Chinese custom?What does the round shape of amooncake represent?What is mooncake made of?What festival in the US is similar to themooncake festival?
    9. 9. LION DANCE Non-professional children’s groups Trained professional groups Street performance, visit each house Blessing people for luck and good fortune Luck money is given in returnhttp://farrymind.blogspot.com/2011/01/celebrating-chinese-new-year-with-lion.html
    10. 10. LION DANCE COMPETITION http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BftIBp-U5jc&feature=related
    11. 11. REFERENCEShttp://o3.indiatimes.com/anmol_jyoti/archive/2007/05/24/4389307.aspxhttp://gourmettraveller88.com/2009/10/03/hong-kong-oct-09/http://www.beijingimpression.com/event/Mid-Autumn-Festival-Beijing.shtml
    12. 12. WATER FESTIVAL Of Southeast Asia
    13. 13. PHOTO ANALYSIS •Look at the photo and answer the following questions. •Make notes in your study guide.
    14. 14. GUIDING QUESTIONS
    15. 15. GUIDING QUESTIONS What do you see in the photos? In which SEA countries were the photos taken? What types of festival do these images and impressions represent? What themes or concepts do these images symbolize?
    16. 16. WATER FESTIVAL
    17. 17. WATER FESTIVALNew Year celebrationMyanmar, Cambodia, Laos,Thailand, Yunnan of ChinaPouring water to one another towelcome the new yearSprinkling water to show respectPouring water = a show of blessingand good wishes
    18. 18. LOCAL NAMES Thingyan Flowers
    19. 19. LOCAL NAMES Thingyan FlowersThailand - Songkran or สงกรานต์(13-15 April)Laos - Pee Mai Lao or ສ"ງການ(13-16 April)Myanmar - Thingyan or သ"က$န&(13 April)Cambodia - Cambodian NewYear បុណ$ចូល()ំថ,ី (13-15 April)
    20. 20. ORIGIN
    21. 21. ORIGINSongkran = passing/movement of the sunentering AriesAdopted from IndiaApril 13 = traditional NewYear’s Day
    22. 22. SONGKRAN GREETINGShttp://www.washingtonpost.com/world/flooding-devastates-thailand/ 2011/10/18/gIQA57EmuL_gallery.html
    23. 23. SONGKRAN GREETINGS สวัสดีปีใหม่ Sa wad dee Pee Mai Happy New Year สุขสันต์วันสงกรานต์ Suksan Wan Songkran Happy Songkran Dayhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/world/flooding-devastates-thailand/ 2011/10/18/gIQA57EmuL_gallery.html
    24. 24. SONGKRAN GREETINGS สวัสดีปีใหม่ Sa wad dee Pee Mai Happy New Year สุขสันต์วันสงกรานต์ Suksan Wan Songkran Happy Songkran Dayhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/world/flooding-devastates-thailand/ 2011/10/18/gIQA57EmuL_gallery.html
    25. 25. SONGKRAN GREETINGS สวัสดีปีใหม่ Sa wad dee Pee Mai Happy New Year สุขสันต์วันสงกรานต์ Suksan Wan Songkran Happy Songkran Dayhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/world/flooding-devastates-thailand/ 2011/10/18/gIQA57EmuL_gallery.html
    26. 26. ACTIVITIES
    27. 27. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    28. 28. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    29. 29. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    30. 30. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    31. 31. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    32. 32. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    33. 33. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    34. 34. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    35. 35. ACTIVITIESTime to visit and pay respectto eldersMake merits/ pray/ offer foodto monkPour scented water overBuddha image and the eldersBring a handful of sand totemple
    36. 36. ACTIVITIES http://www.khaoyaizone.com/article_index.php?sub=article_show&art=80
    37. 37. ACTIVITIESSculpting sand Chedi or stupa,decorated with flags and flowersYounger people considered thisa dateReleasing fish and birdsApril 13 = the National ElderlyDayApril 14 = the National FamilyDay http://www.khaoyaizone.com/article_index.php?sub=article_show&art=80
    38. 38. ACTIVITIESSculpting sand Chedi or stupa,decorated with flags and flowersYounger people considered thisa dateReleasing fish and birdsApril 13 = the National ElderlyDayApril 14 = the National FamilyDay http://www.khaoyaizone.com/article_index.php?sub=article_show&art=80
    39. 39. RE RE KHAO SARN Instruction
    40. 40. RE RE KHAO SARN Instruction Two players hold each others’s hand up high. Other players form a straight line and hold waist of the person in front. Players in the line walk through the couple and sing a song. As soon as the song ends, the couple lower their hands to catch a player who happened to be closer to them. Whoever is caught leaves the game.
    41. 41. RE RE KHAO SARN SONG
    42. 42. RE RE KHAO SARN SONGRe Re Khao Sarn,Song Ta Nan Khao PleukDek Noi Ta Luek, Luek Tong Bai LarnKod Khao Sai Jarn,Koi Pan Khon Khang Lung Wai
    43. 43. MORN SORN PHAInstruction
    44. 44. MORN SORN PHAInstruction One player hold a piece of cloth while other players sit in circle. Players sing a song while the other player walk around trying to hide the cloth behind a player in circle. One noticed the clothed was hidden behind one’s back, the player run around to catch the other player
    45. 45. MORN SORN PHA SONG
    46. 46. MORN SORN PHA SONGMorn Son PhaTook Ka Ta Yu Khang LangWai Non Wai NeChan Ja Tee Gon Ther
    47. 47. RAM WONG WAN SONG KRAN wan ne pen wan songkran, noom sao chao ban berg barn jit jai jing aey torn chao tam boon tam boon tuk bart,tam boon ruam chart tuk bart ruam kan gan aey Kao Wat Tang Tua Tang Tua Suai Sa,Pai Song Nam Phra Na Wan Songkran kan AeyTorn Bai Rao Reng Kee Ra Len Mon Sorn Pha Len Sa Ba Gan Aey Tam Boon Tam Tan Sa-nook Sa-nan gan laew Khor Chern Nong Kaew Ram Wong Kan Aey
    48. 48. SONGKRAN SPLENDORS 2011Watching a video ClipTake note in your studyGuide http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jswRq5QjwRE&feature=player_embedded
    49. 49. 13 PROVINCES Bangkok Nakhon Si Thammarat Chiang Mai Phuket Sukhothai Ayuthaya Khon Kean Suphanburi Nakhon Phanom Chonburi Nongkhai Samut Prakan Hadyai, Songkhlahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Thailand
    50. 50. ASSIGNMENTSWord Search: Songkran Festivalin your study guideMapping According to the video clip, label names of provinces that Songkran Festival was held.
    51. 51. REFERENCEShttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Thailandhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jswRq5QjwRE&feature=player_embeddedhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/world/flooding-devastates-thailand/2011/10/18/gIQA57EmuL_gallery.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_Festivalhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songkranhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thingyanhttp://absoluteresorts.wordpress.com/2011/03/08/songkran-on-the-beach/
    52. 52. KADAYAWAN FESTIVAL of the philippines http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kn0NVSvfFYs&feature=player_embedded
    53. 53. REFERENCEShttp://www.kadayawan.com/home/aboutus/viewAll/0#4http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kn0NVSvfFYs&feature=player_embeddedhttp://www.ppmlservice.com/http://angelaelejorde.blogspot.com/2010/08/mount-apo-sitting-mountain.html

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