Laurea was appointed as a Centre of
Excel­lence in Education for 2010-2012
based on the Learning by Developing
(LbD) Opera...
Laurea with multiple Centre of
Excellence awards
in the Helsinki Metropolitan
Area

Global Best in Post-Secondary Educatio...
About Finland, its position in global economic and
educatianal context

06.11.13

Laurea University of Applied Sciences

3
Finland in a Nutshell
•The second northernmost country in the
world, land frontiers: 586 km with
Sweden, 727 km with Norwa...
“Why Finland's Unorthodox Education
System Is The Best In The World”
“A new global league table,
produced by the Economist...
From “The developing country of Europe”…..
Picture Eero Järnefelt Raatajat rahanalaiset, 1893.
http://fi.wikipedia.org/wik...
GCI Finland
Finland occupies the top position both in the health and
primary education pillar as well as the higher educat...
The Global
Competitiveness Report
2012–2013
As in previous
years, this year’s
top 10 remain
dominated by a
number of
Europ...
Triple Helix
GCI – Global Competitiveness Index 2012-13
-

-

-

Finland Overall 3rd
Basic requirements 4th
- Institutions 3rd
- Infras...
Finnish success based on many
interrelated factors - some keywords
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Equal opportunities
Value of educa...
Policy integration: Systemic and open innovation oriented
and HEIs operate in congruence with
a competitive knowledge soci...
Finland’s Innovation System
Finland has uniquely created a
virtuous circle out of its
information society and welfare
stat...
Finland’s
innovation
strategy
.. is zooming in and zooming
out…

highlights human centric,
self-organising and selfrenewal...
The Global Competitiveness
Report 12–2013
WEF GCI (The Global Competitiveness Report 2012–2013)
Higher education and train...
Don’t discard routines,
challenge them
and creatively explore
new ones!

Science and technology
driven innovation 4%

Prac...
How to maintain and improve quality teaching
and impact of HE at a time of mass higher
education ?
Ahola, Sakari and Hoffm...
Since 1989
UAS

AU
148 000
students

DESCRIPT
ION OF
FINNISH
HIGHER
EDUCATI
ON
Parliament votes about
Peruskoulu 22.11.196...
The mission of AU and UAS
Finnish HEIs are responsible for their own quality management

The mission of
universities (AU) ...
What the quality teaching of higher education might be in
the future of mass higher education?

06.11.13

Laurea Universit...
Measured by student numbers, the higher education
in Finland became a mass higher education system
during the 1970s (Välim...
Balancing between two cultures; the traditional
academic culture and the culture of the free
market (Rinne&Jauhiainen, 201...
Framework for Understanding
Curriculum in HE
(Mäkinen & Annala (2012) based on Barnett and Coate (2005) and Bernstain (199...
Balancing between the needed
competences contributing academia, world
of work, society and individual’s identity

06.11.13...
Learning by Developing (LbD) together with the LivingLabs (LL)
model exemplify the changes and mechanisms HEIs face in
pra...
We have to understand
what‘s going on within ourselves
and in the world

Zooming in (micro level)
Zooming out (macro
level...
Laurea in figures -LbD is an economically sustainable
model with high impact on employment rate and student
initiated star...
Laurea’s Operating Environment
• the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan Area produces
approximately 50% of Finland’s gross dome...
Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 20102015

1. LbD: Generating...
Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 2010-2015

2. Developing the...
Laurea University of Applied Sciences
Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 2010-2015

3. Internationall...
Kanter (1988): Innovation is most likely in
organizations that

(a) have integrative structures,
(b) emphasize diversity,
...
LbD Action Model by Laurea UAS
“The LbD action model views
learning as a tool for
achieving competence, which
in turn is d...
LbD as pedagogical
innovation

Summary of international evaluation
of LbD 2007;
“LbD is a value-based model, where
student...
Living Labs are Self-renewal Human-centric,
Multi-stakeholder Ecosystems for Joint Value
Creation
“What is needed?”
multil...
What is a Living Lab?
Westerlund and Leminen
(2012) “living labs as physical
regions or virtual realities, or
interaction ...
What is a LivingLab
Bergvall-Kåreborn et al, 2009
A Living Lab is a user-centric
innovation milieu built on
every-day prac...
The “users” can be either individuals,
organisations, firms, authorities, cities, or
regions – anything from the micro to ...
Applying Design Studio Model:
Although current dropout rates are modest by international standards,
Finland cannot afford ...
The LbD model, in conjunction with the LivingLab
approach is based on…
…innovation co-creation among various stakeholders
...
Innovation ecosystems
According to Wessner (2007),
innovation ecosystems capture
actors like large and small
businesses, u...
THE COLLABORATIVE LBD PROJECT AS A
REGIONAL LEARNING LIVING LABORATORY
OR AN “ORCHESTRATION TABLE”
Collaborative LbD projects operate as a regional
learning living laboratory and an orchestration table
(1)
Laurea has play...
Orchestration table (2)
An integrative LbD process
consists of:
▶
▶
▶
▶
▶

RDI work,
the social interaction,
knowledge sha...
Orchestration table (3)
Throughout the feedback loops…
… between the
collaboration stages of
interlinked university and
UA...
Orchestration table (4),
The students are equal partners,
… developing and creating new
professional knowledge and skills
...
Through internationally funded
projects and by operating as an
orchestration table
…Laurea can offer its best cooperation ...
Laurea Living Labs and the LbD
action model
Laurea University of Applied Sciences
has optimised both educational and
RDI i...
Laurea aspires, together with its regional and
international partners,
…to construct better RDI
results and improve their
...
Scaling up the PPPP model: Europe as a dynamic, multilayered and multi-dimensional Innovation Ecosystem Consequences
- inv...
Open and user-driven innovation
Many Laurea LbD projects fall into the category of open
innovation (Chesbrough, 2006) or d...
As a consequence of open and user-driven innovation
processes, each and every individual can also learn to
innovate

in th...
Based on Rogers’ (2003) innovation
adopter categorization (1)
Learning to innovate may also be vital for
generating new ma...
generation of energy
about the process;
generation of energy

innovation calls for tangible energy, like
financial resourc...
Helsinki Metropolitan Area’s Innovation
Hubs Living Laboratories and Enriching
Learning Environments
Laurea operates in th...
Laurea’s Profile in the Finnish
Higher Education System
1.
2.

Service innovations and value networks
Internationally ackn...
How has your institution tackled the challenges raised by
mass higher education with respect to maintaining and
improving ...
Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies
and practices IMHE-OECD (Hénard, 2012)

Quality teaching is the u...
Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies
and practices IMHE-OECD (Henard, 2012)
Covered by Laurea Learning...
Fostering Quality in HE “takes place at three interdependent levels” (IMHE-OECD 2012)
National level: HEIs’ central role i...
Human
centricity!
Learning by
Developing is
a Unique way
for Life Long
Learning in
Living
Laboratories
Image thh

06.11.13...
Laurea’s strategy 2010-2015;
Promoting Students’ Professional Growth
Strategic Choices
1.LbD: Generating Future
Expertise ...
Quality assurance system

Laurea University of Applied Sciences

68
CHECK, Operation monitoring and evaluation

Laurea University of Applied Sciences

69
The feedback system in relation to professional
development
Alumni
questionnaire
Graduation
questionnaire
Quality
quiestio...
Joint Regional Competence Development Continuum
Competence
PhD
PhD
Competences

Theses M
M
B
B
PhD
PhD
RDI
project
1

Thes...
Case Example Helsinki
Metropolitan area
Knowledge Triangle and Horison2020

Aalto & Laurea the cornerstones for Living Lab...
EU 2020  Implementation by Seven Flagships

Knowledge Triangle: Create Synergy between Research, Education
and Innovation...
Future? Local Digital Agenda for the Helsinki Region
based on Smart Specialisation. The discussion is going on.
We will pi...
Laurea management system is based on
shared leadership in a self-organising
system, operating as a flock of geese
“Spontan...
Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countri...
Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countri...
Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countri...
Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countri...
Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countri...
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Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countries are making post-secondary education a priority hirvikoski 06112013

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  • Laurea is a research-oriented and developmental university of applied sciences that produces new competence.
    Laurea was appointed as a Centre of Excel­lence in Education for 2010-2012 based on the Learning by Developing (LbD) Operating Model for the fifth time
    According to the Talouselämä magazine ranking Laurea is the second best university of applied sciences
    In the joint application of spring 2009 the number of priority applicants to Laurea grew by 700 and the growth in the attractiveness was thereby proportionally the highest in the country.
    According to an image survey conducted by Taloustutkimus Oy, Laurea is the second-most recognized university of applied sciences
    The employment rate of Laurea graduates has been Finland’s best or second best for years.
    According to the latest information from Statistics Finland the employment rate of Laurea graduates is 90,4% (AMKOTA 2003-2007).
  • We would be honoured if you would accept our invitation to participate in the plenary session entitled “Global Best in Post-Secondary Education: How the World’s Top-Ranked Countries are Making Post-Secondary Education a Priority and Succeeding as a Result”. The session will take place on Wednesday, November 6 2013 at 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
     
    We would also be honoured if you would participate in our “Concurrent Dialogue Sessions: Series A—Exploring International Best Practices,” in which delegates would have an opportunity to converse with you about Finland’s first place standing in Higher Education and Training by the WEF, and Laurea University of Applied Science’s Learning by Developing program. The session will take place on Wednesday, November 6 2013 at 1:30 – 2:45 p.m.
    Finland: Ensuring Graduates Have the Skills to Succeed in the Workplace
    The World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report (2012-2013) ranks Finland first in Higher Education and Training.
    Laurea University of Applied Sciences developed a "competency" strategy, known as Learning by Developing (LbD), to ensure its graduates would have the knowledge, skills, and ability to succeed in the workplace.
    This session will explore the LbD strategy, and share how Laurea University partners with employers to forecast their future employment needs, and design new curricula that break traditional boundaries.
  • SUGGESTED READING
    The Global Fourth Way by Andy Hargreaves and Dennis Shirley
    World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students by Yong Zhao
    The Flat World and Education by Linda Darling-Hammond
    The Price of Inequality by Joseph Stiglitz
    Waging Heavy Peace by Neil Young
  • Building organisation for change and teaching leadership
  • “Innovation steered by demand, paying attention to the needs of customers, consumers and citizens in the operations of the public and private sectors alike, requires a market with incentives and shared innovation processes between users and developers.”
    “Individuals and innovative communities play a key role in innovation processes. Innovation capabilities and incentives for individuals and entrepreneurs are critical success factors in the future.”
    “The exploitation of the results of innovation activities also requires broadbased development activities enhancing structural renewal and determined management of change.”
  • Service Design and Strategic Design, in conjunction with real life experiences from the European Network of Living Labs (ENoLL) community, mainly from Finland, who is moving towards a human-oriented society, and its capital Helsinki, the World Design Capital 2012
    http://wdchelsinki2012.fi/en/wdc-helsinki-2012
    Barcelona, the world mobile capital
    http://mobileworldcapital.com/
  • The Finnish education system consists of pre-school education, comprehensive school, post-comprehensive general and vocational education, higher education and adult education
  • FINHEEC’s audit – Finnish principals
    Finnish HEIs are responsible for their own quality management
    They can develop the quality system for themselves based on their own needs and goals
    Participation in external evaluations of operations and quality systems is obligatory
    The national guiding :The Ministry of Education and Culture/ Finnish Higher Education Evaluation Council (FINHEEC)
    to support quality work of HEIs and disseminate good practices
  • Martin Trow, (1973, 2006)
  • New Public Management NPM
  • The innovation services offer help in recognizing, developing and commercializing new innovations.
    Innovation embryos are refined into commercial products and services, for which suitable business models are identified.
    TULI expert services are made use of during the various stages of the process.
    The HMIP-project interconnects all the innovation services of universities and polytechnics in the metropolitan area.
  • Apart from the cities, the Uusimaa region consists of rural areas. The archipelago areas of Finland, Åland and Estonia are facing many challenges on a social, political and economical level. The social and health care sector is strongly influenced by demographic changes and struggling with the challenge of ensuring equal services for rural and urban areas with limited budgetary conditions. The ageing population, long distances and the possible lack of qualified work force are common challenges in this area.
  • Laurea operates as a matchmaker and a facilitator for public-private-citizen joint projects,
  • The integrative LbD model has gradually been evolving since early 2003 in resonance with the KT and such “transdiscursive” (Miettinen, 2002) concepts as the Knowledge Creation Mode 2 (Gibbons et al, 2008), the Triple Helix of Academia, Industry and State (Etzkowitz et Leydesdorff, 1998), the Entrepreneurial University (Etzkowitz, 2004), the Science II (Hollingsworth et Müller, 2008), The Living Laboratories (ENoLL), the National Innovation System (Miettinen, 2002; Lundvall et Borras, 2005), the Regional Innovation System (Kautonen, 2006) and the Innovation Ecosystem (Bahrami et Evans, 1995; Wessner, 2007; Hämäläinen 2005, 2006, 2007) (Hirvikoski 2009).
  • In order to make the innovation to flourish, Public-Private-People partnership, multilevel governance and cross-sector co-operation is needed. Public pre-procurement, legislative changes, and financial support will help, however it is the individuals who are the sine qua non of any transformation. People centred innovation - It means that public policy can link people to opportunities, infrastructures, competencies and incentives. Then, through the flow of feedback among the different stakeholders and functions the ecosystem will get a change to continuously renew itself. As a consequence, major societal innovation may take place and new industries may emerge. This type of comprehensive approach is not easy, but it may be the best way to tackle the aging as a Grand Challenge or to perceive it as a “Major Opportunity”. That is what ENoLL is for, and the new PPPP initiative, driven by ENoLL is aiming at. - Give the “Butterfly Effect” a chance to change the world!
  • First developed by William J. Mitchell at MIT in 2003 to study people and their interaction with new technologies in a living environment, the Living Lab model was introduced to Europe by Nokia and adapted to the needs of ICT research and development. From there, the method spread, gaining a specifically European version as a user-centric development of the Open Innovation paradigm, based on the co-design of innovative ICT applications in local, often rural, communities.
    Initially regarded only as micro-level test beds, Living Labs are currently evolving into new regional learning environments and macro-level innovation ecosystems. According to Wessner (2007), innovation ecosystems capture actors like large and small businesses, universities, research institutes and laboratories, intermediating organisations, as well as venture capital firms and financial markets. In the innovation ecosystems, knowledge and innovation are created and brought to market with the help of public policies that strengthen the links within the innovation ecosystem and improve innovation-led growth. Also rules, regulations, and incentives as well as shared social norms and value systems are crucial variables of innovation ecosystems. In Laurea, the Living Lab approach has been developed and implemented from micro level to the most extreme macro-level in parallel to the practice-based LbD action model enhancement.
  • Apart from the actual RDI work, the integrative process consists of social interaction, knowledge sharing, collective intelligence, learning and problem solving, and the build-up of related sheared meanings. In the Living Labs, the co-creation of innovation and innovative activities bring the concepts of science close to citizens and the users’ real-life expertise close to researchers, designers and politicians. Also, the stakeholders’ roles as designers, researchers, enablers, or users can vary depending on the project type.
  • Throughout the feedback loops between the collaboration stages of interlinked university and UAS-driven RDI projects, commercialisation and innovation policy, additional, systemic learning and changes may follow both in the wider society or industrial clusters.
  • Through its internationally funded projects and by operating as an orchestration table, Laurea can offer its best co-operation capability also to the international partners and consequently an access to one of the world’s most competitive and advanced metropolitan areas. As a result of these principles and in accordance with the regional Smart Specialisation strategy, HEIs in various countries can foster the enriching and mutual cooperation between their regions and their regional learning Living Labs.
  • Laurea aspires, together with its regional and international partners, to construct better RDI results and improve their commercialisation and usage in organisations and within society. The RDI results, co-created within the frame of LdD, may be turned into innovative marketable products and services by the corporate sector, whereas the public sector may utilise them in their strategies and operations.
  • Open and user-driven innovation
    Many Laurea LbD projects fall into the category of open innovation (Chesbrough, 2006) or demand- and user-driven innovations (von Hippel, 2005), where firms and public organisations develop, experiment and pilot with customers for new products, services and businesses and citizens improve their living conditions (e.g. Loppukiri in Helsinki). In the open and user-driven RDI, LbD applies e.g. action research, ethnographical methods, service design, participatory observation, interviews and focus group methods. Laurea researchers have also widely contributed to theoretical and methodological development in this field.
  • As a consequence of open and user-driven innovation processes, each and every individual can also learn to innovate. This is important because in the era of innovation democratisation calling for a variety of complementary innovations, there is no monopoly but many innovations have seen daylight thanks to everyday laymen actions. This argument is supported by the Innovation Europe survey (2004), according to which only some 4% of innovations are based on academic research whilst the most significant sources of innovation are customer contacts, company networks and the like. Moreover, an on-going survey by Von Hippel (2010, in Kulkki 2012) indicates that 70% of innovations come from the markets and customers.
  • In 2015 Laurea will be an internationally acknowledged university of applied sciences specializing in future expertise and regional development in the metropolitan area.
    Focus areas
    Service operations
    Nursing expertise and ability to cope at home
    Safety and social responsibility
    Student entrepreneurship
    Study programmes
    Social Services, Health and Sports
    Social Sciences, Business and Administration
    Hospitality Management
    Natural Sciences
    Laurea Is a Networked, Multi-disciplinary and International Promoter of Students’ Professional Growth
    Laurea offers 17 Bachelor's Degree Programmes and 14 Master's Degree Programmes in four fields of study.
    Students can supplement their basic studies with optional studies from any other degree programme, in order to build their desired career paths.
    At Laurea, each student participates in genuine project partnerships with companies and organizations.
    Close cooperation with the world of work makes studying at Laurea creative, comprehensive and experiential.
  • The working life oriented learning method Learning by Developing is a pedagogical innovation developed by Laurea.
    The LbD -projects are conducted in partnership with the world of industry and commerce, which means that authentic workplace issues are selected as subjects of studying.
    For students LbD is a new way to get the competence needed in working life: they grow from learners into experts with excellent employment opportunities within their specific fields.
    R&D – New Knowledge and Know-how for Tomorrow's Workplace Challenges
    Laurea does not have separate R&D -units: research and development activities have been strategically integrated into the educational task.
    Working together, Laurea students, lecturers, experts and workplace representatives generate new knowledge and competence for specific areas.
    The cornerstones of the multidisciplinary R&D -projects are the strong presence of students and a creative and inspiring working atmosphere.
  • Laurea offers 17 Bachelor's Degree Programmes and 14 Master's Degree Programmes in four fields of study.
    Students can supplement their basic studies with optional studies from any other degree programme, in order to build their desired career paths.
    The objective of Laurea’s R&D&I activities is:
    to support metropolization,
    to strengthen cluster development,
    to bring about innovation activities and
    to reinforce international knowledge transfer
    The Regional Development Strategy is closely linked to the R&D Strategy.
    Laurea strengthens the innovation capacity of its area of operation and creates favorable conditions for innovation activities
  • This is how Laurea’s Quality System seems as a whole . As you can see there is this plan-do-check-act circle.
    Next lets see more detail of this continuous development circle
  • Laurea defines the success factors for a specific period. One period is about three year.
    The factors can be considered as a key to ‎the fulfilment of strategic intent.
    Indicators and target levels are set for these ‎critical success factors.
    this picture shows that we have now our third strategy implementation plan
    From the first box you can see crtiticall succes factors and indications that we currently uses.
  • Self-organising system may sound suspicions, however if you look at nature you will find successful solutions based on well organised chaos and shared leadership. Take as an example a flock of geese as Hamel suggests and you will find spontaneous harmony and order without careful crafting.
    “Watch a flock of geese turning and swooping in flight, undeterred by wind, obstacles and distance. There is no grand vizier goose, no chairman of the gaggle. They can’t call ahead for a weather report. They can’t predict what obstacles they will meet. They don’t know which of their number will expire in flight. Yet their course is true. And they are a flock.”
    Hamel ((2002),253) Leading the revolution
  • Transcript of "Skills and post secondary education summit 2013 global best in post-secondary education how the world’s top-ranked countries are making post-secondary education a priority hirvikoski 06112013"

    1. 1. Laurea was appointed as a Centre of Excel­lence in Education for 2010-2012 based on the Learning by Developing (LbD) Operating Model for the fifth time Ensuring Graduates Have the Skills to Succeed in the Workplace Learning by Developing (LBD) Operating Model and Quality Learning in Living Laboratories Skills and Post-Secondary Education Summit 2013: Developing the Talent We Need for a Competitive Nation, Toronto, November 6, 2013 Tuija Hirvikoski, PhD (Industrial Management) | MSc (Public Administration) | MSc (Physical Education)  Director | Laurea University of Applied Sciences | www.laurea.fi | ENoLL council member | http://www.openlivinglabs.eu/ Uusimaa Regional Coordination Committee Member Session Chair: Dr. Noreen Golfman, President, Canadian Association of Graduate Schools and Dean, Graduate Studies, Memorial University
    2. 2. Laurea with multiple Centre of Excellence awards in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area Global Best in Post-Secondary Education: How the World’s Top-Ranked Countries are Making Post-Secondary Education a Priority and Succeeding as a Result Skills and Post-Secondary Education Summit 2013: Developing the Talent We Need for a Competitive Nation Toronto, November 6, 2013 Tuija Hirvikoski, PhD (Industrial Management) | MSc (Public Administration) | MSc (Physical Education) Director | Laurea University of Applied Sciences | www.laurea.fi | ENoLL council member | http://www.openlivinglabs.eu/ Uusimaa Regional Coordination Committee Member
    3. 3. About Finland, its position in global economic and educatianal context 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 3
    4. 4. Finland in a Nutshell •The second northernmost country in the world, land frontiers: 586 km with Sweden, 727 km with Norway, 1269 km with Russia •Total area 338,145 km2 •Population 5,4 million •Population density 17 inhabitants / km2 •Capital city: Helsinki •Member of the European Union since 1995 •Two official languages: Finnish and Swedish • 85 % Lutheran, 1% Orthodox •Republic •GDP per capita (US$) .49,350 •Finnish Nature: 4 seasons, 30 000 islands, 200 000 lakes, 2/3 of the area is covered by forests
    5. 5. “Why Finland's Unorthodox Education System Is The Best In The World” “A new global league table, produced by the Economist Intelligence Unit for Pearson, has found Finland to be the best education system in the world.” “is a wonderful case study. Kids start school later; school hours are shorter than most others; they don’t assign homework; their teachers are in front of kids less http://www.businessinsider.com/finlands-education-system-best-in-world-2012-11?op=1#ixzz2jPtKWdld http://thelearningc urve.pearson.com/ the-report
    6. 6. From “The developing country of Europe”….. Picture Eero Järnefelt Raatajat rahanalaiset, 1893. http://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eero_J%C3%A4rnefelt Innovation Union Scoreboard 2013 ….towards “The world’s best country?” “World’s Innovation Hub” “one of the most innovative and Competitive countries” John Kao (2009 )Tapping the World’s Innovation Hot Spots, HBR http://www.newsweek.com/feature/2010/the-world-s-best-countries.html
    7. 7. GCI Finland Finland occupies the top position both in the health and primary education pillar as well as the higher education and training pillar, the result of a strong focus on education over recent decades. This has provided the workforce with the skills needed to adapt rapidly to a changing environment and has laid the groundwork for high levels of technological adoption and innovation. Finland is one of the most innovative countries in Europe, ranking 2nd, behind only Switzerland, on the related pillar. Improving the country’s capacity to adopt the latest technologies (ranked 25th) could lead to important synergies that in turn could corroborate the country’s position as one of the world’s most innovative economies. Finland’s macroeconomic environment weakens slightly on the back of rising inflation (above 3 percent), but fares comparatively well when contrasted with other euro-area economies.
    8. 8. The Global Competitiveness Report 2012–2013 As in previous years, this year’s top 10 remain dominated by a number of European countries, with Switzerland, Finland, Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany, and the United Kingdom confirming their place among the most competitive economies
    9. 9. Triple Helix
    10. 10. GCI – Global Competitiveness Index 2012-13 - - - Finland Overall 3rd Basic requirements 4th - Institutions 3rd - Infrastructure 23rd - Macro economic environment 2th - Health and primary education 1st Efficiency enhancers 9th - Higher education and training 1st - Goods market efficiency 18th - Labour market efficiency 15th - Financial market development 4th - Technological readiness 10th - Market size 54th Innovation and sophistication factors 3rd - Business sophistication 7th - Innovation 2nd
    11. 11. Finnish success based on many interrelated factors - some keywords • • • • • • • • • • Equal opportunities Value of education, engagement and motivation for studies, high work morality Trust & collaboration & complementarity Spirit & inspiration (management by vision) Professionalism and public respect Cultivate creativity and learn from innovation, experiment with the traditions of good teaching Flexibility & tolerance of failures Top down and bottom up, Human centric, self-organising and self-renewal systems Building organisation for change and teaching leadership Sustainable leadership linked to other public policy sectors - education is a long term mission 11/06/13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences - Class-room based teaching - Competition - Testing - Privatisation - Hybrids Your definition:” A skilled person is a person who, through education, training and experience, makes a useful contribution to the economy and society.” http://www.conferenceboard.ca/sp 14
    12. 12. Policy integration: Systemic and open innovation oriented and HEIs operate in congruence with a competitive knowledge society Laurea University of Applied Sciences 15
    13. 13. Finland’s Innovation System Finland has uniquely created a virtuous circle out of its information society and welfare state, through the continuous finance from successful information society. (Castells and Himanen (2002)) The state creates well-educated people in good shape for the information society’s continuous success (Sabel and Saxenian (2008)) Sabel and Saxenian (2008): This success may be sustained for the future, only if the industries could concentrate in innovating radically. => EDUCATE INNOVATORS!
    14. 14. Finland’s innovation strategy .. is zooming in and zooming out… highlights human centric, self-organising and selfrenewal systems The strategy suggests interaction between top down (“a national level definition of needs”) and bottom up (“operator-level customer-oriented preparation of implementation”) systems, since that would provide better opportunities for systemic and sectors crosscutting innovations. “Innovation steered by demand, paying attention to the needs of customers, consumers and citizens in the operations of the public and private sectors alike, requires a market with incentives and shared innovation processes between users and developers.” => APPLY OPEN INNOVATION METHODS http://www.tem.fi/files/21010/National_Innovation_Strategy_March_2009.pd
    15. 15. The Global Competitiveness Report 12–2013 WEF GCI (The Global Competitiveness Report 2012–2013) Higher education and training Quality higher education and training is particularly crucial for economies that want to move up the value chain beyond simple production processes and products. In particular, today’s globalizing economy requires countries to nurture pools of welleducated workers who are able to perform complex tasks and adapt rapidly to their changing environment and the evolving needs of the economy. This pillar measures secondary and tertiary enrollment rates as well as the quality of education as evaluated by the business community. The extent of staff training is also taken into consideration because of the importance of vocational and continuous on-the-job training—which is neglected in many economies—for ensuring a constant upgrading of workers’ skills . http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalCompetitivenessReport_2012-13.pdf
    16. 16. Don’t discard routines, challenge them and creatively explore new ones! Science and technology driven innovation 4% Practice based innovation 96% From coproduction to CoCreation The positive effects of co-creation activities: 1. A broader understanding of stakeholders’ processes and their value creation conducting capability to deliver value for them (e.g. Liedtka & Ogilvie, 2011; Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004), 2. To monitor future possibilities and the landscape of competition (e.g. Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004), 3. To innovate more efficiently (e.g. Liedtka & Ogilvie, 2011; Ramaswamy & Gouillart, 2010).
    17. 17. How to maintain and improve quality teaching and impact of HE at a time of mass higher education ? Ahola, Sakari and Hoffman, David M. (2012) Higher Education Research in Finland – Emerging Structures and Contemporary Issues Laurea University of Applied Sciences 20
    18. 18. Since 1989 UAS AU 148 000 students DESCRIPT ION OF FINNISH HIGHER EDUCATI ON Parliament votes about Peruskoulu 22.11.1963 DEGREES The new school is born 1972-1978 University of Applied Sciences Master’s degrees University of Applied Sciences Bachelor’s degrees 132 000 students Mass higher education in Finland In Finland, the expansion of HE is closely related to the welfare-state agenda (egalitarian policy aims with an emphasis on regional policy). About 65% of the relevant age cohorts study in HEIs. This policy (Triple Helix) has been successful in promoting national development: E.g. in The Global Competitiveness Report 20122013 Finland is in third position. Moreover, Finland had earned the Eurozone’s best credit ratings (AAA)) Higher education is provided by 16 academic universities (AU) and 25 universities of applied sciences (UAS). Laurea University of Applied Sciences | Tuija Hirvikoski
    19. 19. The mission of AU and UAS Finnish HEIs are responsible for their own quality management The mission of universities (AU) is to promote free research and academic and artistic education, to provide education based on research, and to educate students to serve their country and humanity. The UASs have the responsibility •to provide and support the development of a professional workforce, •carry out applied research and development and •support regional development and lifelong learning •develop adult learning and provide vocational teacher training Finnish Higher Education Evaluation Council (FINHEEC) to support quality work of HEIs and disseminate good practices Laurea University of Applied Sciences | Tuija Hirvikoski 22
    20. 20. What the quality teaching of higher education might be in the future of mass higher education? 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 23
    21. 21. Measured by student numbers, the higher education in Finland became a mass higher education system during the 1970s (Välimaa 2012) with the highest entry rates (OECD 2009) However, in 2009 and 2010, a radical change took place; previously “Finnish Universities (AU) have been defined as national cultural institutions, whereas now the aim is to create status hierarchy in Finnish HE system with the establishment of a ‘world class university’ in Helsinki, known as Aalto University.” (Välimaa 2012) “The Finnish university system may take some steps towards AngloSaxon model, in which elite and mass sections are side by side both in the system and institution levels.” (Kivistö&Tirronen, 2012) “New elitism” in Finnish higher education (Kivistö&Tirronen, 2012) Tuija Hirvikoski 24
    22. 22. Balancing between two cultures; the traditional academic culture and the culture of the free market (Rinne&Jauhiainen, 2012) • • • • • • • • The entrepreneurial university, The manageristic university Academic capitalism Mode 2 Interactive models of innovation Triple Helix Knowledge Triangle Living labs Transformation is taking place in the ways university research is carried out and how science-society contract is defined 06.11.13 Global policy and NPM are not processes that change everything simultaneously, buy we are looking at complex and phased processes Laurea University of Applied Sciences| Tuija Hirvikoski 25
    23. 23. Framework for Understanding Curriculum in HE (Mäkinen & Annala (2012) based on Barnett and Coate (2005) and Bernstain (1996) Domain External Internal Knowing Curriculum implementing knowledge-intensive education Curriculum representing disciplinary knowledge Acting Curriculum producing competencies in employment market and society Curriculum supporting growth of academic expertise Being Curriculum providing individual career success Curriculum contributing 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences identity formation process 26
    24. 24. Balancing between the needed competences contributing academia, world of work, society and individual’s identity 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences | Tuija Hirvikoski 27
    25. 25. Learning by Developing (LbD) together with the LivingLabs (LL) model exemplify the changes and mechanisms HEIs face in practice. 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 28
    26. 26. We have to understand what‘s going on within ourselves and in the world Zooming in (micro level) Zooming out (macro level) 21.03.2013 Chuncheon Tuija Hirvikoski SCALE People, Teams Networks Organisations Environments - The built and natural surroundings Cities Regions Europe
    27. 27. Laurea in figures -LbD is an economically sustainable model with high impact on employment rate and student initiated start ups •Turnover, total 54,2 M€ • Of which RDI 12,5 M€ •Total amount of students 7800 • No tuition fees ˜ 99% •Average study time • • Young students Adult students •Staff (man year) • Teaching staff 4,18 years 3,27 years 518 297 •Graduate employment rate 2011 graduated 98,2% •RDI credits/student 10,41 •Student initiated firms 29 •Students/lecturer •Degrees/lecturer 19,88 4,56 (12,5% hold PhD, 8,4% licentiates, 73% Masters) • • 06.11.13 Others RDI involved 222 323 Laurea University of Applied Sciences Tuija Hirvikoski 30
    28. 28. Laurea’s Operating Environment • the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan Area produces approximately 50% of Finland’s gross domestic product • Uusimaa region consists of urban and rural areas • The social and health care sector is strongly influenced by demographic changes and struggling with the challenge of ensuring equal services for rural and urban areas with limited budgetary conditions. The ageing population, long distances and the possible lack of qualified work force are common challenges in particularly in the archipelago • In its operating environment, Laurea is specializing in service innovations and focusing on regional development of the metropolitan area Helsinki Smart City Showcase http://vimeo.com/16424693 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 31
    29. 29. Laurea University of Applied Sciences Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 20102015 1. LbD: Generating Future Expertise and Service Innovations and Promoting Student Entrepreneurship • Strengthening the student-oriented learning culture based on creativity, which brings together teaching and R&D&I. • Promoting the commercialization of ideas and innovations. 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 32
    30. 30. Laurea University of Applied Sciences Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 2010-2015 2. Developing the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan Area • Participating in world class networks that develop the metropolitan area. • Promoting multistakeholder functional entities that develop the metropolitan area. 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 33
    31. 31. Laurea University of Applied Sciences Case Laurea: Strategic Choices and Central Measures for 2010-2015 3. Internationally Recognized and Productive R&D&I • Increasing Laurea’s international recognition, reputation and influence. • Increasing international competence transfer that enriches Laurea’s partners and the region. 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 34
    32. 32. Kanter (1988): Innovation is most likely in organizations that (a) have integrative structures, (b) emphasize diversity, (c) have multiple structural linkages inside and outside the organization, (d) have intersecting territories, (e) have collective pride and faith in people’s talent, and (f) emphasize collaboration and teamwork. Thank You! Tuija.Hirvikoski@laurea.fi
    33. 33. LbD Action Model by Laurea UAS “The LbD action model views learning as a tool for achieving competence, which in turn is demonstrated as new ways of action. LbD provides students and lecturers with genuine encounters with the changing requirements of working life and a collaboration model for functioning as innovative partners” (Raij et NiinistöSivuranta, 2011, 6).
    34. 34. LbD as pedagogical innovation Summary of international evaluation of LbD 2007; “LbD is a value-based model, where student is more comprehensively considered than in other models (which have problems or projects in the centre). LbD model focuses to ensure that students can do – instead of only being able to answer exam questions. Laurea has succeeded in creating a model that works in practice, not only in theory” Competence development in the Community Outcomes: New knowledge, developed competences, innovations for all stakeholders Stronger sense of community and partnership; transparency and communal development of LbD Regional development Development in the workplace R&D projects carried out by staff Student centric r&d&i (LbD) Study unit implementation 12.1.2010 Individual’s learning Practical Hirvikoski & Diz @ NTU INSIGHT relevance of constructive problem (2001 – 2007) Traditional case-study-based teaching 38
    35. 35. Living Labs are Self-renewal Human-centric, Multi-stakeholder Ecosystems for Joint Value Creation “What is needed?” multilevel governance Enablers MNS, SMES Public sector third sector cross-sector co-operation “What is possible?”  Science, technology, innovation (STI) 4%  Doing, using, interacting (DUI) (96%) (Harmaakorpi) We need to learn to innovate!
    36. 36. What is a Living Lab? Westerlund and Leminen (2012) “living labs as physical regions or virtual realities, or interaction spaces, in which stakeholders form publicprivate-people partnerships (4Ps) of companies, public agencies, universities, users, and other stakeholders, all collaborating for creation, prototyping, validating, and testing of new technologies, services, products, and systems in real-life contexts. They are used for the development of communities for the use of innovation.” According to the European Network of Living Labs (ENoLL), the Living Labs are citizendriven open innovation ecosystems in real-life settings in which innovation is fully integrated into the co-creative, codesign processes for new technologies, products, services, and societal infrastructures First developed by William J. Mitchell at MIT in 2003 to study people and their interaction with new technologies in a living environment, the Living Lab model was introduced to Europe by Nokia and adapted to the needs of ICT research and development. From there, the method spread, gaining a specifically European version as a user-centric development of the Open Innovation paradigm, based on the co-design of innovative ICT applications in local, often rural, communities.
    37. 37. What is a LivingLab Bergvall-Kåreborn et al, 2009 A Living Lab is a user-centric innovation milieu built on every-day practice and research, with an approach that facilitates user influence in open and distributed innovation processes engaging all relevant partners in reallife contexts, aiming to create sustainable values.
    38. 38. The “users” can be either individuals, organisations, firms, authorities, cities, or regions – anything from the micro to the most macro level From micro Zoom in & Zoom out ..to the Most Macro Level http://www.dexigner.com/directory/detail/19311.html Helsinki Design Lab is an initiative by Sitra, The Finnish Innovation Fund, to advance strategic design as a way to re-examine, re-think, and re-design the systems we've inherited from the past. We assist decision-makers to view challenges from a big-picture perspective, and provide guidance toward more complete solutions that consider all aspects of a problem
    39. 39. Applying Design Studio Model: Although current dropout rates are modest by international standards, Finland cannot afford to wait to see if this is an early indicator of a growing trend. “A successful education system in the future will be defined by how well it handles diversity and enables all students to participate and thrive.” Dropouts are a leading indicator that reveals a significant challenge and opportunity for education: how to serve all students in an ever-changing, diversifying world. The main concern is to expand the learning environment to reach everyone, including those individuals who learn best in different ways, in different environments and with different skills, interests or intelligences. http://www.dexigner.com/directory/detail/19311.html
    40. 40. The LbD model, in conjunction with the LivingLab approach is based on… …innovation co-creation among various stakeholders within the Helsinki Metropolitan area and internationally. Or, as Pirinen (2012) defines it: “the integrative model refers to the student-centred integration of higher education, research and development (R&D) and regional development in the viewpoint of actualizations of study units with funded R&D projects and within regional R&D actors such as regional innovation system and clusters.”
    41. 41. Innovation ecosystems According to Wessner (2007), innovation ecosystems capture actors like large and small businesses, universities, research institutes and laboratories, intermediating organisations, as well as venture capital firms and financial markets. In the innovation ecosystems, knowledge and innovation are created and brought to market with the help of public policies that strengthen the links within the innovation ecosystem and improve innovation-led growth. Also rules, regulations, and incentives as well as shared social norms and value systems are crucial variables of innovation ecosystems. In Laurea, the Living Lab approach has been developed and implemented from micro level to the most extreme macro-level in parallel to the practice-based LbD action model enhancement.
    42. 42. THE COLLABORATIVE LBD PROJECT AS A REGIONAL LEARNING LIVING LABORATORY OR AN “ORCHESTRATION TABLE”
    43. 43. Collaborative LbD projects operate as a regional learning living laboratory and an orchestration table (1) Laurea has played a crucial role… .. in formulating and implementing regional innovation strategies in partnership with the local authorities, businesses and citizens … in attracting public, academic, corporate and third-sector actors, together with end-users to swarm around the common phenomena and problems
    44. 44. Orchestration table (2) An integrative LbD process consists of: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ RDI work, the social interaction, knowledge sharing, collective intelligence, learning and problem solving, and ▶ the build-up of related sheared meanings In the Living Labs, the cocreation of innovation and innovative activities bring the concepts of science close to citizens and the users’ real-life expertise close to researchers, designers and politicians. Stakeholders’ roles as designers, researchers, enablers, or users vary.
    45. 45. Orchestration table (3) Throughout the feedback loops… … between the collaboration stages of interlinked university and UAS-driven RDI projects, commercialisation and innovation policy, additional, systemic learning and changes may follow both in the wider society or industrial clusters.
    46. 46. Orchestration table (4), The students are equal partners, … developing and creating new professional knowledge and skills whilst growing towards their own fullest potential as human beings. As there is a constant demand for selforganising actions, the model fosters creativity, entrepreneurial competences and critical thinking. Consequently, together they form the bases for learning regional Living labs and people-driven dynamic societies that do not shy away from the challenges but rather organise themselves around them. (Kantola et Hirvikoski, 2012) http://www.laurea.fi/fi/tutkimus_ja_kehitys/julkaisut/Erilliset_julkaisut/Documents/LbD_Guide_041020 11_ENG_lowres.pdf
    47. 47. Through internationally funded projects and by operating as an orchestration table …Laurea can offer its best cooperation capability also to the international partners and consequently an access to one of the world’s most competitive and advanced metropolitan areas. As a result of these principles and in accordance with the regional Smart Specialisation strategy, HEIs in various countries can foster the enriching and mutual cooperation between their regions and their regional learning Living Labs.
    48. 48. Laurea Living Labs and the LbD action model Laurea University of Applied Sciences has optimised both educational and RDI impacts by integrating its awarded educational innovation, Learning by Developing (LbD), with the LivingLabs (LL) model. Together, they provide new mechanisms and interfaces for collaboration among various regional stakeholders and improve citizens’ innovation competences, i.e. grasping the essence of a problem, exploring the problem at hand in wider contexts, drawing conclusions from observations, visualising the possible solutions so that others can follow, and acting on them. 21032013 Hallym Univeristy Tuija Hirvikoski During the last twenty years Laurea has been involved in several, both national and international usercentric RDI projects aimed at developing new services for the elderly. Project examples - CaringTv, Express to Connect, Encounter Art, COM’ON, the Senior Trainer Programme, SATCHEL Facilities - Active life Village - Active Home; SmartHome - Smart Hospital - Medical and Care simulation center 53
    49. 49. Laurea aspires, together with its regional and international partners, …to construct better RDI results and improve their commercialisation and usage in organisations and within society. The RDI results, co-created within the frame of LdD, may be turned into innovative marketable products and services by the corporate sector, whereas the public sector may utilise them in their strategies and operations. http://www.oecd.org/edu/imhe/QT%20policies%20and%20practices.pdf
    50. 50. Scaling up the PPPP model: Europe as a dynamic, multilayered and multi-dimensional Innovation Ecosystem Consequences - involves creative and motivated professionals and citizens to the development of Active and Healthy Ageing solutions and the transformation of behaviour - creates innovative solutions from the micro to the most macro level of the Active and Healthy Ageing systems - decreases innovation obstacles - boosts Europe as a lead market of Active and Healthy Aging - boosts new spin-offs and supports growth companies - gives companies an opportunity to grow in the emerging Asian (global) markets - generates meaningful new jobs 11/06/13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 55
    51. 51. Open and user-driven innovation Many Laurea LbD projects fall into the category of open innovation (Chesbrough, 2006) or demand- and user-driven innovations (von Hippel, 2005), where firms and public organisations develop, experiment and pilot with customers for new products, services and businesses and citizens improve their living conditions (e.g. Loppukiri in Helsinki) In the open and user-driven RDI, LbD applies e.g. action research, ethnographical methods, service design, participatory observation, interviews and focus group methods. Laurea researchers have also widely contributed to theoretical and methodological development in this field.
    52. 52. As a consequence of open and user-driven innovation processes, each and every individual can also learn to innovate in the era of innovation democratisation calling for a variety of complementary innovations, there is no monopoly but many innovations have seen daylight thanks to everyday laymen actions. the Innovation Europe survey (2004): only some 4% of innovations are based on academic research whilst the most significant sources of innovation are customer contacts, company networks and the like. an on-going survey by Von Hippel (2010, in Kulkki 2012) indicates that 70% of innovations come from the markets and customers.
    53. 53. Based on Rogers’ (2003) innovation adopter categorization (1) Learning to innovate may also be vital for generating new markets and behavioural patterns in the civic society, as those who learned to innovate, may either become the “leader-users” that create new ways of consuming and solving problems, or they may join the “early majority” adopting novelties. Models like LbD might help the HEIs not only to produce a high level of education but also improve citizens’ innovation competences, i.e. ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ grasping the essence of a problem, exploring the problem at hand in wider contexts, drawing conclusions from observations, visualising the possible solutions so that others can follow, and ▶ acting on them.
    54. 54. generation of energy about the process; generation of energy innovation calls for tangible energy, like financial resources, juridical support and capital goods, however, the most successful systems have a capacity to produce cognitive and emotional energy cognitive energy based on the holistic and interactive approaches and it provides the rationale to understand the requisite inconveniences and their temporary role in the progress of innovation proactive innovation intellects empower themselves and others emotionally; they also receive emotional energy from the others “Culture create passion, passion inspire doing, using and interaction” 12.1.2010 Hirvikoski & Diz @ NTU INSIGHT 59
    55. 55. Helsinki Metropolitan Area’s Innovation Hubs Living Laboratories and Enriching Learning Environments Laurea operates in the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan Area, which produces approximately 50% of Finland’s gross domestic product. Helsinki In its operating environment, Laurea is specializing in service innovations and focusing on regional development of the metropolitan area. Laurea University of Applied Sciences Tuija Hirvikoski 60
    56. 56. Laurea’s Profile in the Finnish Higher Education System 1. 2. Service innovations and value networks Internationally acknowledged and productive research, development and innovation activity 3. An operating model that promotes the development of working life by integrating learning and R&D (Learning by Developing) 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 61
    57. 57. How has your institution tackled the challenges raised by mass higher education with respect to maintaining and improving teaching and learning? 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences 62
    58. 58. Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies and practices IMHE-OECD (Hénard, 2012) Quality teaching is the use of pedagogical techniques to produce learning outcomes for students. It involves several dimensions, including the effective design of curriculum and course content, a variety of learning contexts (including guided independent study, project-based learning, collaborative learning, experimentation, etc.), soliciting and using feedback, and effective assessment of learning outcomes. It also involves welladapted learning environments and student support services. 06.11.13 •Raising awareness of quality teaching •Developing excellent teachers •Engaging students •Building organisation for change and teaching leadership •Aligning institutional policies to foster quality teaching •Highlighting innovation as a driver for change •Assessing impacts Laurea University of Applied Sciences | Tuija Hirvikoski 63
    59. 59. Fostering Quality Teaching in Higher Education: Policies and practices IMHE-OECD (Henard, 2012) Covered by Laurea Learning by Developing (LBD) Operating Model Quality teaching is the use of pedagogical techniques to produce learning outcomes for students. It involves several dimensions, including the effective design of curriculum and course content, a variety of learning contexts (including guided independent study, project-based learning, collaborative learning, experimentation, etc.), soliciting and using feedback, and effective assessment of learning outcomes. It also involves welladapted learning environments and student support services. 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences •Raising awareness of quality teaching •Developing excellent teachers •Engaging students •Building organisation for change and teaching leadership •Aligning institutional policies to foster quality teaching •Highlighting innovation as a driver for change •Assessing impacts 64
    60. 60. Fostering Quality in HE “takes place at three interdependent levels” (IMHE-OECD 2012) National level: HEIs’ central role in building Europe, measured in terms of social and economic progress The Laurea LbD Elements Fostering Quality Learning 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences | Tuija Hirvikoski 65
    61. 61. Human centricity! Learning by Developing is a Unique way for Life Long Learning in Living Laboratories Image thh 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences ! 66
    62. 62. Laurea’s strategy 2010-2015; Promoting Students’ Professional Growth Strategic Choices 1.LbD: Generating Future Expertise and Service Innovations and Promoting Student intiated and Growth Entrepreneurship 2.Developing the Greater Helsinki Metropolitan Area 3.Internationally Acknowledged, Productive R&D&I 06.11.13 Laurea University of Applied Sciences •Laurea’s strategic choice is to integrate its three main tasks: education, regional development and R&D. •Learning by Developing (LbD) is an innovative operating model based on authenticity, creativity, partnership and experimental approach. 67
    63. 63. Quality assurance system Laurea University of Applied Sciences 68
    64. 64. CHECK, Operation monitoring and evaluation Laurea University of Applied Sciences 69
    65. 65. The feedback system in relation to professional development Alumni questionnaire Graduation questionnaire Quality quiestionnaire of education and learning International student mobility feedback questionnaire Internship feedback questionnaire Instant feedback Study unit feedback questionnaire forward
    66. 66. Joint Regional Competence Development Continuum Competence PhD PhD Competences Theses M M B B PhD PhD RDI project 1 Theses B B PhD PhD Failed RDI applicati Failed RDI on application B B M M B B Theses B B B B B B M M B B RDI project 3 development PhD PhD Failed RDI application RDI project 2 RDI project n LbD = co-creation of new knowledge, skills and innovation with multiple stakeholders Dissemination (national and international innovation diffusion and export of knowledge) Commercialization, entrepreneurship, Spin-offs Aika
    67. 67. Case Example Helsinki Metropolitan area Knowledge Triangle and Horison2020 Aalto & Laurea the cornerstones for Living Labs Laurea University of Applied Sciences 72
    68. 68. EU 2020  Implementation by Seven Flagships Knowledge Triangle: Create Synergy between Research, Education and Innovation Special need to focus on: A. Value creation based on better use of intangible assets B. New processes and methods for university-industry collaboration C. Systemic change and societal innovations Co - or rW lo p ve De fo rF or es igh if e gL ki n t& fo cr e rm ati on t fo Pl a Innovation Pla t nt me fo rm Orchestration Benefits are evident: For students For teaching staff For researchers For working life professionals Research Education Platform for Blended Learning © Markku Markkula
    69. 69. Future? Local Digital Agenda for the Helsinki Region based on Smart Specialisation. The discussion is going on. We will pioneer solutions to tackle Grand Societal Challenges. We will focus on: 1. Smart Urban Design 2. Active and Healthy Ageing 3. Low Carbon Economy This means especially fueling Industrial Leadership by focusing on: 1. Regional Service Architecture and Modeling 2. Digitalization of System Processes, especially Services 3. Mindset and Environment for Start-up and Growth Companies And this means on global level science excellence focusing on: 1. Open Innovation Interlinked Ecosystems 2. Integrating Real and Virtual Reality 3. Future and Emerging Technologies This is the proposal made by Markku Markkula on 6 May 2012 based on the CoR Horizon 2020 draft opinion, Vanguard Group LDA activities, the EUE/RIE plans and the EU Smart Specialisation Mirror Group.
    70. 70. Laurea management system is based on shared leadership in a self-organising system, operating as a flock of geese “Spontaneous harmony”, “order without careful crafting” “Watch a flock of geese turning and swooping in flight, undeterred by wind, obstacles and distance. There is no grand vizier goose, no chairman of the gaggle. They can’t call ahead for a weather report. They can’t predict what obstacles they will meet. They don’t know which of their number will expire in flight. Yet their course is true. And they are a flock.” Hamel ((2002),253) Leading the revolution The Country Brand Delegation ”the unbiased, solution-focused approach to problems which derivers from our history and culture. When faced with impossible situation we roll up our sleeves and double the speed.”
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