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An introduction to looking at
             Shapes
 Grade   Level: Kindergarten *(can be
  modified for K-6)*
 Topic: Geome...
Class Setting:
This will be a whole group lesson where the students will listen
to the teacher read a book aloud and then ...
Concepts
In kindergarten, students are introduced to the different
geometric shapes: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus),...
Background
   Teacher Background
           Ability to recognize and describe the following geometric
            shapes: ...
Connection To Other Areas

The students will become familiar with different geometric
shapes by noticing that they occur i...
Connection To Past And
     Future Lessons
This lesson will introduce the students to the content of recognizing and
descr...
STANDARDS:
  Pennsylvania Department of Education
Approaches to Learning
AL 3: Demonstrate Reasoning and Problem Solving
A...
Temple University
     Performance Standards:
   Understanding Content
    Standard 6: The ability to teach
    subject-ma...
OBJECTIVES/GOALS
Student will be able to:
         Brainstorm the different shapes that they already know and can identify...
MATERIALS
Students:

       Worksheet
       Shapes cutouts   (Rectangle, Square, Diamond
        (Rhombus), Oval, Circle,...
MATERIALS
Teacher:
          Book: Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes, Shapes. New
           York, NY: Greenwillow Books...
CLASSROOM
CLIMATE/TRANSITIONS
 Students  will sit on rug in whole group for the
  reading of the story and the discussion ...
PROCEDURE
Motivation Activity: Shapes Story/shapes discussion (10-15 minutes)
   Before reading the story, the teacher wil...
PROCEDURE
Activity 1: Shapes Picture (15-20 minutes)
   After reading the book, the students will choose a shape cutout to...
PROCEDURE
Closure Activity (5-10 Minutes)
  The teacher will select a few pictures that show understanding of the
  conten...
Transitions
Students will need to move into a seat on the
rug where they are able to see/hear the
teacher as they read the...
Materials:
Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes, Shapes. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books.
Shapes Worksheet
ASSESSMENT

   Assessment during the discussion and reading of book will be done on
    the spot by evaluating the respons...
Rubric
           Objective                 Yes   Somewhat   No


1. Student labels picture with
   name of shape cutout

...
Rubric (completed)
           Objective                      Yes          Somewhat      No


1. Student labels picture wit...
Sample Work
Student Requires Support
Student is Developing Skills
Student Meets Expectation
RESOURCES
   Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes,
    Shapes. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books.
   Wittenberg, L., Economop...
Mathedlesson
Mathedlesson
Mathedlesson
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Mathedlesson

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Transcript of "Mathedlesson"

  1. 1. An introduction to looking at Shapes Grade Level: Kindergarten *(can be modified for K-6)* Topic: Geometry
  2. 2. Class Setting: This will be a whole group lesson where the students will listen to the teacher read a book aloud and then participate in a group discussion on shapes. Students that have a tendency to “Tune out,” or are distracted easily during whole-group settings, may need their seats to be moved closer to the teacher.
  3. 3. Concepts In kindergarten, students are introduced to the different geometric shapes: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle. Students need to be able to recognize these different shapes by sight, as well as be able to distinguish and describe the attributes or characteristics that make each shape different from one another. A lesson such as this one requires students to display their knowledge by identifying shapes, by properly describing the attributes of each shape that distinguishes it from other shapes, and then using them to create a drawing that represents a real life situation.
  4. 4. Background Teacher Background Ability to recognize and describe the following geometric shapes: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle Ability to make observations and communicate them effectively Student Background Ability to recognize and describe the following geometric shapes: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle Ability to make observations and communicate them effectively Ability to use pencil, scissors, and glue stick
  5. 5. Connection To Other Areas The students will become familiar with different geometric shapes by noticing that they occur in the natural world that exists around them. This real world connection of observing how shapes appear in everyday objects helps to give the students the experience of seeing how the abstract concepts and topics of mathematics have a consistent, logical and coherent connection to the experiences that they know first- hand, thus making their understanding of the concepts more meaningful.
  6. 6. Connection To Past And Future Lessons This lesson will introduce the students to the content of recognizing and describing geometric shapes by using the correct mathematical terminology. In past lessons, students may have been able to recognize and describe geometric shapes, but did so without using the correct vocabulary, which means they did not fully possess understanding of geometric shapes. In order to complete future lessons in the correct manner, students must master this lesson’s geometry content by becoming familiar with the different geometric shapes and the correct terminology for describing them. By completing this lesson, the student will be able to identify and describe a geometric shape in a context that is familiar to them (drawing that they will make) which demonstrates their understanding of the content of the lesson. Each subsequent and related lesson will give the students more opportunities to test and utilize their understanding of the lesson’s content in new and different ways.
  7. 7. STANDARDS: Pennsylvania Department of Education Approaches to Learning AL 3: Demonstrate Reasoning and Problem Solving AL 3.8 Classify, compare and contrast objects, events and experiences Mathematics 2.4 Mathematical Reasoning and Connections A. Use math vocabulary comparison terms when making predictions regarding the quantity, size, and shape of objects 2.9 Geometry A. Identify common two and three-dimensional geometric shapes D. Name and describe two-dimensional geometric shapes in real life
  8. 8. Temple University Performance Standards: Understanding Content Standard 6: The ability to teach subject-matter content so that it is understood Real-World Connections Standard 4: Teaching for all students that enhances Real-World Connections
  9. 9. OBJECTIVES/GOALS Student will be able to: Brainstorm the different shapes that they already know and can identify Recognize and describe the following geometric shapes: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle Look at these geometric shapes and discuss, identify, and describe them using the proper mathematical vocabulary Know the characteristics that make each shape unique and different from the other shapes Identify and describe the different types of 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional shapes and configurations that they notice in real life Demonstrate that they understand the content of the lesson by completing a picture that is comprised of different geometric shapes Recognize the logical and sequential connection to how a picture can be created by using the different geometric shapes to represent various real world objects/people Explain what shapes they used to make their picture Explain what their picture is a representation of by writing a sentence describing it
  10. 10. MATERIALS Students: Worksheet Shapes cutouts (Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle) Sample writing of shape’s name Pencil, scissors, colored pencils or crayons, glue stick
  11. 11. MATERIALS Teacher: Book: Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes, Shapes. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books. Picture of or plastic manipulative for each of the different geometric shapes (Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle) Dry erase/chalk board or large pad of paper Dry erase pen, chalk, or marker Worksheet Shapes cutouts (Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle) Sample writing of shape’s name Pencil, scissors, colored pencils or crayons, glue stick
  12. 12. CLASSROOM CLIMATE/TRANSITIONS Students will sit on rug in whole group for the reading of the story and the discussion of what “Shapes” they see Students will then move to their seats for creation of “Shapes picture” Students will reconvene on rug as whole group to present work if time permits
  13. 13. PROCEDURE Motivation Activity: Shapes Story/shapes discussion (10-15 minutes) Before reading the story, the teacher will ask the students to name and identify the different shapes that they already know. The students will have to describe how they can identify which shape is which, by giving the characteristics that qualify it as a particular shape. For example, a square is “Like a box” or a triangle has “Three pointy parts.” The teacher will make a list of these shapes/qualities on the board/paper The teacher will assess the list of shapes and verify that the shapes that the lesson is focusing on have been listed (i.e.: Rectangle, Square, Diamond (Rhombus), Oval, Circle, and Triangle) The teacher will add any shape that was not included to the list The teacher will tell the students that they will be reading a story about shapes that exist in the real world The teacher will read the story and ask the students to identify/describe the different shapes that they see
  14. 14. PROCEDURE Activity 1: Shapes Picture (15-20 minutes) After reading the book, the students will choose a shape cutout to use as the basis for creating a picture. The teacher will tell the students that they will be making a picture by taking one of the shapes cutouts and then adding things to it The teacher will explain that they will take one shape cutout and glue it onto their worksheet after they cut it out The teacher will explain that the students will then add other shapes or more drawing onto the worksheet to create a picture of something of their choice The students will fill in the sentence that describes the picture that they created The students will fill in the sentence that identifies the different shapes that they used to make their picture
  15. 15. PROCEDURE Closure Activity (5-10 Minutes) The teacher will select a few pictures that show understanding of the content and exemplary work. The students will reconvene on rug as a whole group. Selected students will be given the opportunity to share or present their shapes pictures to other members of the class. If the student is too shy to present, the teacher will ask if they can present the work for them. If time permits, the teacher will review with the students the different geometric shapes and their attributes by verbally quizzing them.
  16. 16. Transitions Students will need to move into a seat on the rug where they are able to see/hear the teacher as they read the book or lead the discussions. After the story and discussion are over, the students will return to their seats to complete the picture that they will make on their worksheet
  17. 17. Materials:
  18. 18. Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes, Shapes. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books.
  19. 19. Shapes Worksheet
  20. 20. ASSESSMENT Assessment during the discussion and reading of book will be done on the spot by evaluating the responses that students give to the teacher’s questions. The teacher will review the finished work and assess it keeping the following criteria in mind: Did the student label their picture with the name of the shape cutout that they used? Did the student describe in writing what they added to the shape cutout to create their picture? Did the student correctly use Upper case letters when writing? Did the student correctly use Lower case letters when writing? Can the student write words with correct spacing of letters? Can the student correctly space their words when writing? Student attempts “best try” writing? Did the student exhibit purposeful work when completing the task (good detail, lots of colors, careful writing)? A student may need further support in the criteria areas that do not fall under the “Yes” section of the rubric.
  21. 21. Rubric Objective Yes Somewhat No 1. Student labels picture with name of shape cutout 2. Student describes what they added to shape to create the picture 3. Students correctly uses Upper case letters when writing 4. Student correctly uses Lower case letters when writing 5. Student correctly spaces their words when writing 6. Student can write words with correct spacing of letters 7. Student attempts Òbest try Ó writing 8. Student exhibits purposeful work (good detail, lots of colors, careful writing)
  22. 22. Rubric (completed) Objective Yes Somewhat No 1. Student labels picture with Clearly name of shape cutout labeled. 2. Student describes what Used Òbest they added to shape to tr y Ó writing create the picture 3. Students correctly uses Some word Upper case letters when are all caps writing 4. Student correctly uses Some words Lower case letters when are all caps writing 5. Student correctly spaces All w ords their words when writing are 6. Student can write words All letters with correct spacing of are letters 7. Student attempts Òbest try Ó All w ords writing are 8. Student exhibits Lots of purposeful work (good detail detail, lots of colors, careful writing)
  23. 23. Sample Work
  24. 24. Student Requires Support
  25. 25. Student is Developing Skills
  26. 26. Student Meets Expectation
  27. 27. RESOURCES Hoban, Tonya (1986). Shapes, Shapes, Shapes. New York, NY: Greenwillow Books. Wittenberg, L., Economopoulos, K., Bastable, V., Bloomfield, K., Cochran, K., Earnest, D., et al. Investigations in Number, Data and Space Second. Glenview, Illinois: Pearson Education, 2008. Session 1.1 pages 23-27.
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