Overview Of The Inclusion Statement - Session Three

1,739
-1

Published on

Special Educational Needs and/or disabilities: a training resource for secondary undergraduate Initial Teacher Training courses

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,739
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Overview Of The Inclusion Statement - Session Three

  1. 1. Development and diversity Overview of the inclusion statement Special educational needs and/or disabilities Training toolkit Session 3
  2. 2. Learning outcomes <ul><li>You will: </li></ul><ul><li>understand the implications of the national curriculum inclusion statement </li></ul><ul><li>be able to identify appropriate learning objectives for students, or groups of students, with SEN and/or disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>know how to base your expectations of students with SEN and/or disabilities on accurate assessment and tracking of progress </li></ul><ul><li>have a basic awareness of how to use fine-grained national curriculum level and P scale assessments to support planning </li></ul>
  3. 3. Learning outcome <ul><li>You will understand the implications of the national curriculum inclusion statement for your practice </li></ul>Activity 1
  4. 4. The three principles of inclusion <ul><li>Set suitable learning challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to students’ diverse learning needs </li></ul><ul><li>Overcome potential barriers to learning and assessment for individuals and groups of students </li></ul>
  5. 5. The circles of inclusion Responding to students’ diverse needs Setting suitable learning challenges Overcoming potential barriers to learning Teaching styles Access Learning objectives = inclusion
  6. 6. Main points from the film clip <ul><li>Challenging learning objectives set for the group </li></ul><ul><li>Work that built on students’ interests and cultural experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Use of visual and kinaesthetic teaching approaches </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching approaches that created a climate where all students felt able to contribute and have their contributions valued </li></ul><ul><li>Use of approaches for individuals and groups to overcome barriers to learning </li></ul>
  7. 7. Learning outcomes <ul><li>You will understand: </li></ul><ul><li>when it is appropriate for students to work on the same objectives as the class as a whole </li></ul><ul><li>when you may need to ‘track back’ to identify earlier objectives, linked to those for the class as a whole </li></ul><ul><li>when a student may need distinct, different objectives that can still be met through the activities planned for the class </li></ul>Activity 2
  8. 8. Learning outcomes (continued…) <ul><li>You will: </li></ul><ul><li>understand when it may be appropriate for a student to work on alternative therapeutic or individual objectives </li></ul><ul><li>be able to draw on curriculum guidance and subject frameworks to identify learning objectives appropriate for students working below expectations for their age </li></ul>Activity 2
  9. 9. Getting the learning objectives right Responding to students’ diverse needs Setting suitable learning challenges Overcoming potential barriers to learning Teaching styles Access Learning objectives = inclusion
  10. 10. Issues when choosing learning objectives <ul><li>Same as the class as a whole? </li></ul><ul><li>Linked to the class topic but earlier (tracked back) in a progression? </li></ul><ul><li>Distinct and different but can be met through the planned activities for the class? </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative, not linked to either the topic or activities of the class? </li></ul>
  11. 11. Learning outcome <ul><li>You will learn how to base your expectations of what students with SEN and/or disabilities can achieve on accurate assessment and tracking of progress against predictions derived from national data sets </li></ul>Activity 3
  12. 12. Percentage achieving five good GCSEs 23 per cent Students with SEN but no statement 59 per cent All students
  13. 13. Percentage making two levels’ progress over key stage 3 <ul><li>In the top 25 per cent of schools, 50 per cent of students make two levels’ progress from key stage 2 to key stage 3 in English </li></ul><ul><li>The figure for all schools is only 30 per cent </li></ul>
  14. 14. Converting levels to points scores 3.4−5.0 P8 2.6−3.0 P7 2.1−2.5 P6 1.6−2.0 P5 1.1−1.5 P4 0−1 P3 0 P1−2 Points score Level/grade
  15. 15. Converting levels to points scores 25 27 29 4c 4b 4a 4 19 21 23 3c 3b 3a 3 13 15 17 2c 2b 2a 2 7 9 11 1c 1b 1a 1 Points Sub-level Level
  16. 16. Converting levels to points scores 37 39 41 6c 6b 6a 6 31 33 35 5c 5b 5a 5 Points Sub-level Level
  17. 17. The significance of points <ul><li>Minimum expected progress is approximately two national curriculum levels or six sub-levels over KS3 </li></ul><ul><li>Two levels or six sub-levels = 12 points </li></ul><ul><li>Average progress is roughly two sub-levels or four points a year </li></ul><ul><li>Actual progress varies in relation to prior attainment </li></ul><ul><li>Higher rate of progress needed for individuals to ‘catch up’ </li></ul><ul><li>Higher rate of progress required nationally if standards are to be raised </li></ul>
  18. 18. Expected progression from KS3 to GCSEs G Below 2 F 2 E 3 D 4 C 5 B 6 A (and A* in English) 7 A* (in maths) 8 GCSE grade Key stage 3 NC level
  19. 19. Tracking students’ progress 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21+ 9 8 7 6 5 x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Outcome score (eg KS3 test result) Input score (eg KS2 average points score)
  20. 20. What factors in the school’s/setting’s provision led to this student making such rapid progress? To inquire further… Why has this student made so little progress?
  21. 21. … this information box pops up on the screen to tell you more about the attainment profile for the individual student − or group of students − if one of the larger blobs is selected ‘ Hover’ your pointer over this dot and…
  22. 22. The school’s value added line suggests that typically low-attaining students in the school have done better than the national median… … while students attaining in the medium range have made progress in line with the national median… … and high-attaining students have typically done less well than the national median – and, in terms of progress, are among the lowest 25 per cent Question: What is proving particularly successful with lower-attaining students? School median line
  23. 23. Which of these students had learning mentors as part of their BESD provision?
  24. 24. Learning outcomes <ul><li>You will: </li></ul><ul><li>reflect on key learning points from the session </li></ul><ul><li>identify key points of action to consolidate and apply your learning </li></ul>Activity 4
  25. 25. Key learning points <ul><li>The national curriculum inclusion statement is concerned with learning objectives, teaching styles and access strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Students, or groups of students, with SEN and/or disabilities should have learning objectives matched to their needs </li></ul><ul><li>Learning objectives for students with SEN and/or disabilities can be: the same as those for the class; linked to the class topic but from earlier in a learning progression; distinct and different but part of the class activities; or alternative objectives in place of, or in addition to, class objectives </li></ul>
  26. 26. Key learning points (continued…) <ul><li>Teachers’ expectations of students have a significant influence on their progress </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations of what students with SEN and/or disabilities can achieve must be based on accurate assessment and tracking of progress </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations need to be based on the effective use of data, and need to be pitched as high as possible </li></ul>

×