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ESCalate Seminar- Assessment: Challenging Practice
 

ESCalate Seminar- Assessment: Challenging Practice

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Professor Sue Bloxom's keynote speech "what are we really trying to do with assessment in teacher education- resolving conflicting purposes and principles"

Professor Sue Bloxom's keynote speech "what are we really trying to do with assessment in teacher education- resolving conflicting purposes and principles"

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    ESCalate Seminar- Assessment: Challenging Practice ESCalate Seminar- Assessment: Challenging Practice Presentation Transcript

    • What are we really trying to do with assessment in teacher education: Resolving Conflicting purposes and principles Sue Bloxham
    • Certification to identify and discriminate between different levels of achievement, and between students, providing a license to practice in the case of professional programmes, enabling selection of students for further study and employment. This is assessment of learning.
    • Quality assurance to provide evidence for relevant stakeholders (for example headteachers, ofsted, external examiners) to enable them to judge the appropriateness of standards on the programme This is assessment of learning.
    • Student Learning
      • to promote effective learning
      • formative and diagnostic
      • steering students’ approach to learning
      • giving the teacher useful information to inform changes in teaching strategies.
      This is assessment for learning .
    • Lifelong learning: sustainable assessment This is assessment as learning . to achieve an understanding of standards, to learn how to make judgments, to be able to use criteria, to be able to tell when you really understand something
      • Reformed vision of the curriculum
      • All students can learn
      • Challenging subject matter aimed at higher order thinking & problem solving
      • Equal opportunity for diverse learners
      • Socialisation in to the discourse and practices of academic disciplines
      • Authenticity in the relationship between learning in and out of school
      • Fostering of important dispositions and habits of the mind
      • Enactment of democratic practices in a caring community
      • Cognitive and constructivist Learning Theories
      • Intellectual abilities are socially & culturally developed
      • Learners construct knowledge and understandings within a social context
      • New learning is shaped by prior knowledge & cultural perspectives
      • Intelligent thought involves ‘metacognition’
      • Deep understanding is principled and supports transfer
      • Cognitive performance depends on dispositions and personal identity
      Classroom Assessment From Shepard, L.A. (2000)
    • Discussion
      • Discuss with those sitting near you:
      • Where you think the emphasis lies in your programmes.
      • Do assessment strategies include, explicitly or implicitly, all four purposes or do they major on one or two.
    • Conflict in assessment purposes Group assessment Un-seen examinations Peer & self assessment Presentations, debates
    • Unseen exam Essay Poster setting out scientific work for lay readers Press release Reflective journal Debate speech Designing a leaflet for parents or web resource School-based project Working in a group to make a radio programme Curating an online exhibition Familiar ‘safe’ assessment Methods. Examiners will understand. Newer methods which may assess a wider range of learning and different communication skills Tutor marked Self, peer and tutor marked
      • comes at the draft stage,
      • Isn’t graded
      • is forward looking
      • focuses on skills rather than content.
      • Look only at final pieces
      • Look for comments that justify the mark against the learning outcomes
      • encouraging a focus on marks, and feedback on content
      Studies suggest that useful feedback to students But moderators and external examiners Who is the tutor writing their comments for?
    • Dealing with conflict
      • Two potential ways forward
      • Taking a programme approach to assessment design
      • Making greater use of assessment methods which combine different purposes
    • Programme assessment environment
      • Factors
      • How many exams
      • Variety of ass. Methods
      • How much summative assessment
      • How much formative assessment
      • How much oral feedback
      • How much written feedback
      • Timeliness of feedback
      • Explicit criteria & standards
      • Alignment between outcomes & assessment
      • Can influence
      • Student effort
      • How much of the syllabus they cover
      • Usefulness of feedback
      • Use of feedback by students
      • Whether students know what is expected of them
      • Whether they focus on deep or surface approaches to learning
      • Whether exams encourage learning
      From Gibbs & Dunbar-Goddet (2007)
    • Programme assessment map D= developed A=assessed Con’t through all modules/ placements D D D 206 D D DA 205 D 204 D D DA 203 D DA 105 D DA 104 D D D 103 D 102 D D 101 Programme outcome 6 Programme outcome 5 Programme outcome 4 Programme outcome 3 Programme outcome 2 Programme outcome 1 modules
    • Discussion
      • How successfully do you think your programmes achieve a programme approach to assessment?
      • Do they plan and co-ordinate assessment across the different elements of students’ programme?
    • Combining the different purposes of assessment
      • Two things we need to do:
      • identify what are the key characteristics of learning-oriented assessment
      • choose assessment methods that meet those characteristics whilst also fulfilling the purposes of certification and QA
      • Reformed vision of the curriculum
      • All students can learn
      • Challenging subject maater aimed at higher order thinking & problem solving
      • Equal opportunity for diverse learners
      • Socialisation in to the discourse and practices of academic disciplines
      • Authenticity in the relationship between learning in and out of school
      • Fostering of important dispositions and habits of the mind
      • Enactment of demoncratic practices in a caring community
      • Cognitive and constructivist Learning Theories
      • Intellectual abilities are socially & culturally developed
      • Learners construct knowledge and understandings within a social context
      • New learning is shaped by prior knowledge & cultural perspectives
      • Intelligent thought involves ‘metacognition’
      • Deep understanding is principled and supports transfer
      • Cognitive performance depends on dispositions and personal identity
      • Classroom Assessment
      • Challenging tasks to elicit higher order thinking
      • Addresses learning processes as well as learning outcomes
      • An on-going process, integrated with instruction
      • Used formatively in support of student learning
      • Expectations visible to students
      • Students active in evaluating their own work
      • Used to evaluate teaching as well as student learning
      From Shepard, L.A. (2000)
    • Characteristics of learning-oriented assessment
      • Formative
      • Demands higher order learning
      • Learning and assessment are integrated
      • Students are involved in assessment
      • It promotes thinking about the learning process;
      • Assessment expectations should be made clear;
      • Involves active engagement of students, developing independent learning;
      • Tasks should be authentic and involve choice ;
      • Tasks align with important learning outcomes
      • Assessment should be used to evaluate teaching.
    • Field-based enquiry
      • includes formative stages, students can get help and feedback in a low stakes way
      • Expectations available to students both in written criteria and embedded in feedback
      • Potential to integrate learning from university with learning from other contexts
      • integrated with the learning
      • encourages independent and active learning
      • involves students in the assessment process (avoiding grades in the early stages)
      • higher order skills, complexity
      • authenticity, choice
    • Interactive exam
      • higher order thinking
      • integration of university knowledge and classroom knowledge
      • authenticity
      • student involvement in assessment
      • gaining feedback (from expert solutions) and taking action on it.
      • Involves reflection
      • Exam marking scheme shared with students before the exam
    • Patchwork text
      • Integration of professional and subject learning
      • Focus on learning process
      • Assessment is integrated with learning
      • Integrates formative and summative assessment
      • Student involvement in assessment
      • Complex task requiring higher order and critical thinking
      • Independent, autonomous learning
      • Reflection