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Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment
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Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment

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Presentation by Steve Gill, Schools Analysis and Research Division and Zenta Henkhuzens, Disadvantage and Education Team

Presentation by Steve Gill, Schools Analysis and Research Division and Zenta Henkhuzens, Disadvantage and Education Team

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  • Welcome Introduce myself and Gerard Delighted to have with us Niel McLean, Executive Director of Becta; Andrea Shirley, National Agency Engagement Manager, and Vanessa Pittard Director of E-Strategy. Aims of the session today are to explore Becta’s role in ‘Narrowing the Gaps’ between disadvantage and achievement, as well as providing further details of the Home Access scheme. Also an opportunity to start a conversation about how IT can help in progressing your individual policy areas As you can see from the agenda behind me, most of the session today will be led by colleagues from BECTA but just want to kick off with some context about the attainment gap for disadvantaged pupils, show you some of the latest data and tell you a little bit about what we are doing within narrowing the gaps division to tackle this issue.
  • Over the past 13 years the Labour Government has placed a consistent emphasis on raising standards across the board. Since 1997 school standards, measured by average attainment of the pupil cohort have risen steeply with strong improvement in national tests and examinations. However, we need to look in more detail at these results if we’re to break the link between a child’s background and their educational success and life chances. More recently, there has been an emerging focus on the distinct needs of particular groups of children from a number of perspectives; social, economic, health and educational The introduction of the national pupil database in 2002 enabled us to take huge strides forwards in identifying particular vulnerable groups of pupils of particular characteristics who were falling behind. This has historically been mirrored in international comparisons. The example I am focussing on today is specifically related to the narrowing of educational attainment gaps of school age children.
  • This chart shows the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 results. The closer a country is to the top of the chart, the better its average student performance in science. The closer a country is to the right-hand side of the chart, the weaker the link between the socio-economic background of its pupils and their performance in science. You’ll note in both respects we’re above average but there is further to go to join the very best of the world’s education systems.
  • Our work in this area is primarily driven by PSA targets which have been around since 1998 PSA 11 is the target focussed on narrowing the gap for a number of groups This commits us to: narrowing achievement gaps at the Early Years Foundation Stage; narrowing the achievement gap between pupils eligible for free school meals and their peers at Key Stages 2 and 4; - which is my particular area of interest It must be noted that we use Free School meals as a proxy indicator for deprivation – it’s by no means perfect but it’s the best we have at the moment and identifies the bottom 15% of pupils from low income families. We are also committed to: narrowing gaps in the proportion of pupils progressing by 2 levels in English and mathematics at the end of Key Stages 2, 3 and 4; increasing the numbers of Looked After Children reaching Level 4 in English at Key Stage 2 and reaching Level 4 in mathematics at Key Stage 2; increasing the numbers of Looked After Children achieving 5 or more good GCSEs at Key Stage 4; and narrowing the gap between full-time higher education initial participation rates for young people aged 18-20 from the top three and the bottom four socio-economic classes.
  • So how wide is the gap for pupils in receipt of FSM at the moment and what progress are we making? Well the gap is pretty substantial – attainment gaps between FSM and non-FSM open up early and they continue to widen throughout primary and secondary education. By Key Stages 3 and 4, the odds of a non-FSM pupil reaching the threshold are around 3.5 times those of an FSM pupil. Trends over time show that FSM gaps are narrowing but only slowly and the gap that remains is still unacceptably large – particularly for white working class boys, who are our lowest attaining group. So this is the issue – what are we doing about it?
  • Welcome Introduce myself and Gerard Delighted to have with us Niel McLean, Executive Director of Becta; Andrea Shirley, National Agency Engagement Manager, and Vanessa Pittard Director of E-Strategy. Aims of the session today are to explore Becta’s role in ‘Narrowing the Gaps’ between disadvantage and achievement, as well as providing further details of the Home Access scheme. Also an opportunity to start a conversation about how IT can help in progressing your individual policy areas As you can see from the agenda behind me, most of the session today will be led by colleagues from BECTA but just want to kick off with some context about the attainment gap for disadvantaged pupils, show you some of the latest data and tell you a little bit about what we are doing within narrowing the gaps division to tackle this issue.
  • Our strategy is based on five levels. Many of the intervention strategies pick up on themes addressed by Steve such as parental engagement and pupil aspirations. So how does this translate into our programme of work? The intervention strategies listed on the right hand side are aspects of many of our existing DCSF policies and programmes.
  • We reviewed existing policy areas and sifted out the top 8 considered to have the most impact on gap narrowing. Many of the areas identified in Steve’s research were considered at this stage. Why 11? Well we needed to be realistic. Out of over 100 different policy areas in place we needed to prioritise a manageable number to monitor with existing resource restrictions.
  • Here are our policy areas and programmes considered to have the most impact on pupils in receipt of free school meals. Many of these are mentioned in the White Paper 21 st century schools which promotes the role of personalised learning in schools and an increased accountability in the system for narrowing the gaps. These include such initiatives as the School Report Card and 121 tuition. I’m afraid I don’t have time to brief you on the details of each one but am happy to share further information another time. In summary most of the programmes are offering target support to schools in deprived areas or are particular intervention programmes to tackle those pupils who are falling behind. We are also strengthening accountability in the system through the school report card which will be introduced from Sept 2011 and LAs targets to narrow the gap which were introduced last year. We are also reviewing the school funding methodology to better account for deprivation but it’s not easy to align accountability and funding systems!
  • We also run our own action research project in over 100 schools which is trialling a range of activities to raise the achievement and aspiration of disadvantaged children. Again, I’m sorry I don’t have time to share more of this with you, it’s something I’m very passionate about and is generating some fantastic case studies. We are currently considering how we might extend this project next year.
  • Considering the DCSF’s making policy guidance it’s fair to say that we did not have the luxury of commissioning new research to inform our rationale. We needed to work with what was already in place, to mainstream and look to modify existing work strands to better serve the needs of disadvantaged pupils. I think it’s fair to say these were our ‘options’. Our ‘securing delivery’ has come from us acting as ambassadors in the system, identifying those policy areas as having the most potential impact on disadvantaged pupils and working with policy leads to modify their programmes accordingly. Evaluating impact is a real challenge for use. Ministers want data and they want it now. We are currently working with our stats colleagues to model the impact of a small number of our programmes. National test results form the bulk of our impact assessments.
  • Welcome Introduce myself and Gerard Delighted to have with us Niel McLean, Executive Director of Becta; Andrea Shirley, National Agency Engagement Manager, and Vanessa Pittard Director of E-Strategy. Aims of the session today are to explore Becta’s role in ‘Narrowing the Gaps’ between disadvantage and achievement, as well as providing further details of the Home Access scheme. Also an opportunity to start a conversation about how IT can help in progressing your individual policy areas As you can see from the agenda behind me, most of the session today will be led by colleagues from BECTA but just want to kick off with some context about the attainment gap for disadvantaged pupils, show you some of the latest data and tell you a little bit about what we are doing within narrowing the gaps division to tackle this issue.
  • Welcome Introduce myself and Gerard Delighted to have with us Niel McLean, Executive Director of Becta; Andrea Shirley, National Agency Engagement Manager, and Vanessa Pittard Director of E-Strategy. Aims of the session today are to explore Becta’s role in ‘Narrowing the Gaps’ between disadvantage and achievement, as well as providing further details of the Home Access scheme. Also an opportunity to start a conversation about how IT can help in progressing your individual policy areas As you can see from the agenda behind me, most of the session today will be led by colleagues from BECTA but just want to kick off with some context about the attainment gap for disadvantaged pupils, show you some of the latest data and tell you a little bit about what we are doing within narrowing the gaps division to tackle this issue.
  • What next for us? As I’ve already mentioned impact data is something Ministers want and want now. One of our challenges is to allow time for initiatives to ‘bed down’ – schools often ask us for a year or two, the minister wants it yesterday! Identifying and spreading good practice amongst our schools is a real challenge – esp in light of funding cuts to field forces. Schools and their workforce are over burdened and busy and do not have time to search online for case studies. What we need is to provide readily accessible advice and guidance. We are considering how we might expand our own Extra Mile project alongside maintaining momentum in our cross departmental policy areas. It would be lovely if we could develop a 0-19 strategy – our department is silo based, we have different teams looking at different sections of PSA 11 with schools working separately from early years, fe and 14-19. So we need to work together to identify how we can pull together a coherent narrative and strategy thereby plotting the journey of a disadvantaged child through the system. We are working closely with our delivery partners, TDA, CWDC, NC, Becta to raise the profile of NtG and identify opportunities in their work programmes to strengthen our delivery capacity.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment Steve Gill, Schools Analysis and Research Division Zenta Henkhuzens, Disadvantage and Education Team Presentation at DCSF Conference: The Use of Evidence in Policy Development and Delivery, 9 February 2010
    • 2.
      • Narrowing the Gaps – The Current Picture
      • Narrowing the Gaps – The DCSF Programme of Work
      • Using LSYPE to Deconstruct Attainment Gaps
      • Next Steps for Analysts and Policy
      Contents
    • 3.
      • Narrowing The Gaps
      • The Current Picture
    • 4.
      • Emergent policy priority
      • Raising standards in education 1997-present
      • Striving for equality – the needs of
      • particular groups
      • Different perspectives: social, economic, health and educational
      • Introduction of the national pupil database 2002 significant
      • National results and international comparisons
      Why is Government interested in NtG?
    • 5. PISA 2006 - variance in schools an issue
    • 6. PSA 11 Indicators - focus on narrowing gaps for a range of underachieving groups in the context of raising standards overall
        • Achievement gap at early years
        • foundation stage
        • Achievement gap between pupils
        • eligible for free school meals and
        • their peers achieving expected levels
        • at KS2 and KS4
        • Proportion of pupils progressing
        • by 2 levels in English and maths
        • at the end of KS2 and expected
        • progress by the end of KS4
        • Achievement gap between Looked
        • After Children and their peers
        • reaching level 4 in English and level
        • four in maths at KS2
        • Achievement gap between Looked After
        • Children and their peers achieving 5A*-C
        • GCSE or equivalency at KS4
        • Gap between rates of initial participation in full time higher education for young people from
        • the top three and bottom four socio-economic classes.
    • 7. During the foundation stage, the odds of a non-FSM pupil achieving 6 points across the CLL scales are 2.5 times that of a FSM pupil By the end of KS1, the odds of a non-FSM pupil achieving level 2 in reading writing and maths are 3 times that of a FSM pupil. This gap is maintained during KS2 (doesn’t widen). The gap widens further during secondary education. At KS3 and at KS4 the odds of a non-FSM pupil reaching the threshold are around 3.5 times that of a non-FSM pupil. The ratio narrows slightly on entry to HE, but the gap is still large. The propensity for FSM pupils to enter Higher Education is low Narrowing the Gap has to start at an early age. Other departments are key partners, e.g. Department of Health Breaking the link between low income and poor attainment/achievement. Gaps open early; chances of school success are three times worse
    • 8.
      • Narrowing The Gaps
      • The DCSF Programme of Work
    • 9. Narrowing the Gap programme of activity
      • In March 2009 we published Breaking the Link between disadvantage and low attainment: Everyone’s Business, which set out a clear strategy to address the FSM attainment gap, with intervention actions on 5 levels.
      • The document included a range of data including:
      • The Trends in International Maths and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007
      • The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) results 2007
      • Ofsted Reports on outstanding schools
      • And presented a range of data including Key Stage results comparing
      • pupils in receipt of Free School Meals with those not in receipt
      • of Free School Meals.
    • 10. Intervention actions on 5 levels Barriers to FSM pupils attaining as well as their peers Intervention Strategy A. Raising visibility and awareness B. Early years and parents C. Targeted support in basics D. Beyond classroom E. School and LA accountability
      • No focused policies on FSM pupils till now
      • LAs / schools not identifying or tracking progress of FSM group
      • Stigma surrounding FSM children persists
      • FSM pupils start behind / permanent catch-up
      • Less parental engagement in child’s learning from birth (but more key to success than school)
      • Often inter-generational history of educational failure
      • A1. Identification of disadvantaged pupils and target/track their progress
      • A2. Overcome stigma – comms or incentives
      • B1. Early years services and parental support services target disadvantage
      • B2. Focus on home / school interface
      • FSM pupils start behind peers / make slower progress
      • Teacher expectations lower
      • Home-learning environment less rich
      • C1. Preventative work with target groups
      • C2. Redeploy teachers to lowest ability groups
      • Opportunities provided by family, peer-group and community less
      • Unlikely to have the social capital of middle-class parents
      • Lack of joined up services
      • FSM attainment has been invisible in main channels
      • Success in gap-narrowing not rewarded at LA, school, service or practitioner level
      • D1. Broaden pupils experiences
      • D2. Use extended services
      • D3. Join up services, address linked issues
      • E1. Use external and self evaluation to focus on gaps not just attainment
      • E2. Incentivise (inc funding) and reward accordingly
    • 11. Overview of NtG programme of Activity
      • We identified a long list of existing policies that are already narrowing gaps or that could do so.
      • Based upon impact (extent, speed and ease of implementation), we identified 11 top existing programmes (since expanded to take on further programmes many mentioned in Schools White Paper).
      • From each programme we have or will agree work strands that focus on NtG and increase impact.
      • Each NtG work strand has specific actions built into delivery plans.
      • Modelled impact, where possible, for each policy area.
    • 12. DCSF NtG policies/programmes
      • National Challenge
      • City Challenge
      • Curriculum
      • Extended Schools
      • Academies
      • 121 Tuition
      • Parental Engagement
      • Every Child interventions
      • School report card
      • LA Target Setting
      • School Funding
    • 13. Extra Mile – Aims
      • To narrow the gap in educational achievement between disadvantaged children and their more advantaged peers   from EYFS to KS4
      • To raise the aspirations of disadvantaged children, and engage them in their education
      • To demonstrate that schools in deprived areas can make a difference to children ’ s achievement and aspiration through targeted activities and support
      • To transfer identified school improvement processes and key activities which have been particularly successful in raising aspirations and attainment   across the school system
      We also manage Extra Mile, a school-based action research project specifically aimed at raising achievement of disadvantaged pupils in over 100 schools
    • 14.
      • Establishing Rationale
      • Testing Options
      • Securing Delivery
      • Evaluating Impact
      DCSF’s making policy model
    • 15.
      • Using LSYPE to Deconstruct Attainment Gaps
    • 16. What is the background to this work?
      • New team in Schools Analysis and Research Division
      • Part of remit to broaden understanding of factors related to pupil attainment and progression
      • Collecting together a range of sample datasets which, in some cases, can be matched to National Pupil Database
      • Allows models to be constructed which contain broader range of topics which can affect progress
      • This is a presentation of some of the methodology and emerging findings from this work
    • 17. Can we get the caveats out of the way early on please?
      • These are emerging findings
      • They are subject to revisions
      • They are just a couple of sections of the current work
      • The current work will hopefully only be the first part of a longer term scheme of work
    • 18. Why the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England?
      • LSYPE has lots of extra information about pupils’ home background e.g. parental employment status, income, education
      • LSYPE also collected information about aspirations, parental engagement, etc
      • LSYPE matched to NPD, and the cohort have GCSE results available (unlike EPPSE, ALSPAC)
      • https://ilsype.gide.net/workspaces/public/wiki/Welcome
    • 19. Are there any issues with using LSYPE?
      • Only a sample of 15,000 young people
      • Uses the 2006 GCSE cohort - things may have changed and some of the questions are slightly dated
      • So why are you using it then?
      • Minority ethnic groups and schools with high FSM rates were oversampled, so have reasonable numbers for our areas of interest
      • Key results probably still hold, and we’re not aware of a more recent dataset that can be used to do the same
    • 20. What does this work do that makes it different?
      • Many reports have put different factors into models of progress to see relative importance of each
      • Here we take things one step further to look at specific groups of pupils and see what affects them
      • Gaps arise where one group is disproportionately affected by negative factors than another
      • LAs set targets for eight ‘under-performing groups’
      • This work shows which factors ‘contribute’ most to their underperformance, and which ones are protective
    • 21. What is the starting point for your work?
      • Two regression models produced, each with outcome variable of capped GCSE points score
      • 1. Looks at KS2-4 progression so includes KS2 attainment
      • 2. Looks at raw attainment so excludes KS2 attainment
      • Contain all the variables from Contextual Value Added model as well as some of the interesting ones that come from LSYPE or Annual School Census
      • These give coefficients for how important each factor is for predicting KS4 attainment or KS2-4 progress
    • 22. What happens to Free School Meal eligibility in this broader model?
      • Well known that there are wide FSM gaps in attainment and progress at national level (2006 CVA model = -25 points, LSYPE sample = -33 points)
      • On national datasets, FSM is the only indicator we have of a pupil’s home circumstances, but seems unlikely that FSM status itself is causing gaps
      • Using the extra LSYPE information we can understand which family/home characteristics are related to attainment and progress
      • We find that FSM status is now only of relatively minor importance (-7 points)
    • 23. So where does the FSM gap go then?
      • Coefficient reduced by three quarters, but FSM gap can’t vanish – must now be explained by other factors
      • Some of the new variables must be explaining what had previously shown up under FSM eligibility
      • These variables contribute most to FSM gap where the magnitude of the coefficient is large and the characteristic is considerably more prevalent among either FSM or non-FSM pupils
      • If a characteristic occurs fairly equally in all pupils or only has a small impact then it does not contribute as much to a gap
    • 24. Aren’t FSM gaps particularly large among White British pupils?
      • Yes - therefore, the following analysis relates specifically to White British FSM pupils and White British non-FSM pupils
      • Corresponding analysis has been carried out comparing FSM and non-FSM pupils from the underperforming ethnic minority groups
      • That work not presented here to avoid repetition, but worth noting that overall gap is a little smaller
    • 25. FSM pupils, on average, more likely to have the ‘negative’ characteristics FSM pupils Non-FSM pupils Lone parent 62% 20% Parents with no qualifications 36% 6% NS-SEC of routine 68% 22% No vehicle in household 50% 7% No internet 61% 18% Special Educational Needs 40% 16% No parent working 70% 9% Low aspirations 25% 14% Mean IDACI 0.38 0.18 Mean KS2 score 24.6 27.5
    • 26. How do you actually get to the part where you deconstruct the gap?
      • Take coefficients from the model and combine them with the frequencies with which each characteristic occurs in each group
      • This gives an average effect for each component of attainment (eg NS SEC) for each group
      • The difference between the two effects is the size of the gap that can be attributed to that component
    • 27. Can you give an example to show what you mean?
      • NS-SEC ‘responsible’ for an FSM gap of 2.44 points in progression from KS2-4
      Coefficient Rate in Non-FSM Rate in FSM Difference in rates Gap (points) Higher professional 7.04 12.6% 0.7% 11.9% 0.84 Lower professional 3.82 25.4% 5.8% 19.6% 0.75 Intermediate 4.85 19.4% 8.9% 10.5% 0.51 Lower supervisory -0.01 12.6% 8.5% 4.0% -0.00 Routine 0.00 19.6% 50.2% -30.6% 0.00 Missing 0.78 10.3% 25.9% -15.5% -0.12 Total - 100.0% 100.0% 0.0% 1.98
    • 28. What other factors have you done this for? Category Components Income and material deprivation Private/supplementary classes, access to computer, internet and vehicle, FSM eligibility, household income. Parental background NS-SEC, parental education levels Family composition Parental , birth position within siblings Parental engagement Parental aspirations, attitudes to reports, attending school events, attitudes towards year 10 subject choice Family employment Whether parents work Aspirations Pupil aspirations Area deprivation IDACI Pupil effects SEN, EAL, mobility, been in care, mobility, ethnicity School composition Gender of cohort, cohort prior attainment, school FSM rate. School effectiveness School KS2-4 CVA score Prior attainment KS2 average point score (only in progression model)
    • 29. KS4 FSM gaps in progression model
    • 30. FSM gaps in raw KS4 attainment
    • 31. The same process can be used to examine ethnicity gaps
      • Certain factors are more prevalent among underperforming ethnic minority groups – some are negative, while others protect against the gap
      • Using the importance of the facts (as seen earlier) and the rates with which the factors occur in underperforming ethnic minority groups, we can also deconstruct the (much smaller) ethnicity gaps
      • Protecting factors will go the opposite direction on the charts…
    • 32. KS4 ethnicity gaps in progression model
    • 33. Ethnicity gaps in raw KS4 attainment
    • 34. Key messages from research
      • Gaps are not down to just one problem
      • Need to address policies in the right areas and in a range of areas – just targeting schools won’t have huge impacts on gaps
      • Differences between problems linked with progress and problems linked with raw attainment
      • Targeting issues around deprivation will disproportionately affect those groups that underperform
    • 35.
      • Next Steps
      • For Analysts and Policy
    • 36. Next steps from analysis perspective
      • Nothing set firmly in stone
      • Changes in priorities could take the team in any number of directions
      • But…we would be interested in
        • replicating work using EPPSE for KS1-2 progress and KS2 attainment
        • using ALSPAC to look at progress and attainment through whole of school life
        • looking at development of LSYPE 2
      • Watch this space?
    • 37. Next Steps/Challenges
      • Carrying out impact analysis of each of the NtG policy areas – allow for time to ‘bed down’
      • Identifying and spreading good practice amongst schools – how?
      • Developing a 0-19 Narrowing the Gaps Strategy
      • Embedding NtG in strategic partners’ business plans
    • 38. Contact details
      • Steve Gill Schools Analysis and Research Division Tel: 0207 340 7782 Email: steve.gill@dcsf.gsi.gov.uk
      • Zenta Henkhuzens Team Leader, Disadvantage and Education Tel: 0207 783 8778 Email: zenta.henkhuzens@dcsf.gsi.gov.uk
    • 39. Deconstructing attainment gaps: How LSYPE can help explain gaps in pupil attainment Steve Gill, Schools Analysis and Research Division Zenta Henkhuzens, Disadvantage and Education Team Presentation at DCSF Conference: The Use of Evidence in Policy Development and Delivery, 9 February 2010

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