A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities
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A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities

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A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities

A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities

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A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities A1 (2) - Glendra Read (IOE): Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities Presentation Transcript

    • Looking back and going forward: materials to support the teaching of pupils with SEN and/or disabilities Glendra Read, Institute of Education, University of London
  • Need for national consistency across ITE
    • Validation of practice in effective institutions
    • Improvement to the practice of less effective institutions
    • Progression in training – a unified strategy/staged model
    • Linked to the revision of the professional standards
    • TDA commissioned IoE to trial pilot projects
  • Aims of the projects
    • To drive forward knowledge, skills and understanding of trainees in inclusive practice for SEN and disability
    • To help trainees develop inclusive teaching skills to remove barriers to learning and participation for pupils with a wide range of needs
    • To devise approaches and materials to support the fulfilment of these aims
  • Does the pupil with SEN and/or a disability need a special pedagogy?
    • Davis and Florian (2004) reported that
    • ‘ the more important agenda is how to develop a pedagogy that is inclusive to all learners’
    • Norwich and Lewis (2007) reported that only pupils with autism spectrum condition and ADHD were seen as requiring a pedagogy that is specific to their group needs
  • The research also tells us…
    • Listen to the individuals (w e know from research that teachers still talk through 60-75% of most lessons)
    • Poor acoustics damages the attainment of all, particularly pupils with SEN (Shield and Dockrell 2002)
    • English building regulations for schools have been tightened - future generations will benefit
    • Look at the evidence of ‘what works’ for pupils with SEN
    • Build what we learn into our education systems
  • Resources – the elements
    • E1 18 primary undergraduate sessions
    • E2 4 week placements in special schools
    • E3 Taught sessions for NQTs for LAs
    • E4 Electronic portal
    • E5 Assessment/exemplars for trainees/NQTs
    • E8 18 secondary undergraduate sessions
    • E9 PGCE taught sessions
    • E10 Personalised learning task
    • E11 14 subject booklets and 17 SSTs
  • Results from the pilot of E1
    • Trialled successfully in 9 institutions with 700 trainees
    • Very positive responses: comprehensive coverage, quality and relevance
    • Tutors reviewed their programmes and brought the materials into them
    • Wide variation in approaches
  • Results from the pilot of E2
    • Trialled successfully in 17 universities with 250 trainees
    • Very positive across all universities and schools
    • Trainees enthused about the experience, the commitment of staff and the effects on the way they felt about their teaching careers
    • On balance, the data suggested a preference for a four week model, because of the powerful impact it could have on trainees’ development as teachers
    • The experience worked best in Y3 of a 4 year course
  • The Ofsted review
    • All PGCE courses were at least satisfactory in preparing trainees to teach pupils with LDD
    • Variation in practice and quality throughout
    • Heavy reliance on school placement: worked well in some schools, less well in others
    • Planning of other adults’ work was good, the monitoring of it weaker
    • Insufficient co-ordination of quality assurance procedures between providers and schools
    • (Ofsted, 2008, How well new teachers are prepared to teach pupils with learning difficulties and/or disabilities) HMI: 070223.
  • The aims of E5
        • To encourage professional dialogue between trainees and their tutors/mentors about effective practice in teaching pupils with SEN and/or disabilities
        • To relate that dialogue to the professional standards – and thereby help to promote consistency of assessment against the standards
  • Results from the pilot of E5
        • Trialled in 5 universities and 12 LAs
        • Welcomed as innovative and helpful
        • Improved dialogue between schools/universities and schools/LAs
        • Strengthened role of SENCO/Inclusion manager in supporting NQTs
        • Involved mentors more robustly in SEN issues
        • Gave trainees a broader view of SEN and disability issues
  • The Ofsted view: the journey
    • The best NQTs were: ‘grounded in LDD pedagogy; skilled communicators; reflective practitioners; identified what worked and what didn’t; accepted responsibility for the good progress of all’.
    • Thank you