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Jisc FE and skills development and resource programme – innovation through
technology
Annex A – proposal template
Section ...
A similar need has also been identified in South Wales, where a large number of automotive supply chain
companies are also...
The overall outcomes of the project will be:
• Increased engagement with learning by the automotive industry and supply ch...
Engaging with other sectors
Phase 3 will also seek to establish motivation in other sectors for the model that has been de...
Section 6 (budget)
All type C and D projects (where the budget requested is over £15,000)
must complete (and attach) the b...
Work-plan and outputs
The work-plan consists of four key work-packages which are detailed in the Table below:
WP Work-pack...
2(c) Pilots & updates • Run induction programme
• Pilot system and gain feedback (Wales
and West Midlands)
• Evaluate pilo...
Experience and capacity of project team and partners
PARTNERS
• Birmingham Metropolitan College
Birmingham Metropolitan Co...
functions, employer and partner relationships, and quality improvement, ensure that solutions delivered from
a technology ...
Annex C: Project Budget
Amount Other information
Staff costs (including on costs)
Project Director
(Senior Manager, 0.1FTE...
Summary of the qualitative, and any quantitative, benefits your organisation will expect to receive
from the project
The q...
Annex D: Risk Assessment
Type of risk
Probability
of
occurrence
(1 Low-5
High)
Severity of
impact
(1 Low
- 5 High)
Overall...
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Jisc fe and skills development and resource programme proposal

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  1. 1. Jisc FE and skills development and resource programme – innovation through technology Annex A – proposal template Section 1 (contact details, project type and project objectives) Name of lead provider Birmingham Metropolitan College Full contact details for primary contract: Name: Anthony Gribben-Lisle Position: Director of Technology and Innovation Email: anthony.gribben-lisle@bmetc.ac.uk Tel: 0121 362 1105 Address: Sutton Coldfield Campus, Lichfield Road, Sutton Coldfield, B74 2NW Which project type are you bidding for? (you must tick one of the boxes below): Type A: Small project Type B: Medium project √ Type C: Large project Which project objective does your bid mainly focus on? (you must tick one of the boxes below): Integrating new technologies Overcoming barriers to the adoption and use of technology in the sector √ Developing new uses of technology and / or the innovative adaption and rollout of technologies Section 2 (project description) Describe how the funding you are seeking will be used to address the project objective(s) that you are focussing on and take account of Phase 1 activity as appropriate. You should identify the customer need for the project outputs and address issues of sustainability and capacity building, making evident how the resulting benefits will be realised. (800 words) Project context The Auto Share and Learn project has the objective of creating an online web-based support system for supply chain companies in the automotive sector. The intention is that the supply chain support system model developed by the project will be transferrable and of benefit across the automotive sector and manufacturing industry generally. The project is partnering with a major employer, Jaguar Land Rover (JLR), and the SEMTA Sector Skills Council. JLR has announced large-scale investment in the UK to extend its production. New investments have generated 9,000 jobs which will increase to almost 11,000 with the creation of a further 1,700 jobs. Each job created at JLR will be mirrored by several more in the supply chain. A key issue is the recruitment, retention and development of a workforce with the required skills to meet the pace and related technology of this growth. As a result, Jaguar Land Rover set up a ‘Suppliers Training Group’ with the support of SEMTA to enhance skills development across JLR and its supply chain. The same supply chain skills support model will be needed by other companies as the economy recovers. Project need The Suppliers Training Group has identified a need for utilising online resources and social media to support suppliers and accelerate their ability to up-skill existing and entry level staff, with a focus on: • Utilising online learning resources • Sharing expertise and resources • Self/mutual help and support • Collaborative developments
  2. 2. A similar need has also been identified in South Wales, where a large number of automotive supply chain companies are also located. Project aims and objectives This is a collaborative bid led by Birmingham Metropolitan College together with JLR and Coleg Sir Gâr, strongly supported by three experts with significant experience of the automotive sector and Jisc projects. The main project aim is to use the JLR Suppliers Training Group experience in developing its “Auto Share and Learn” online web resource as a model that can be used for general supply chain support across manufacturing industry as well as in other sectors such as construction, and transport. The project has four key phases and the objectives of each phase are as follows: • Phase 1: Project set-up and research: o Develop a project team with clearly identified project plan, stakeholder communications and engagement plan and clear benefits for all partners. o Identify available learning resources and tools (especially from the FE/Skills phase 1 programme) and how they can be contextualised. o Develop a specification for the “Auto Share and Learn” system covering its functionality and how it will deliver the supply chain skills developments. • Phase 2: Supplier engagement: o Develop systems (hosted infrastructure and “apps”) as defined in the Phase 1 specification for use by JLR and supply chain companies and to engage end-users in the process. o Within both the West Midland and Wales:  Develop and implement a comprehensive programme of end-user involvement.  Carry out pilots, evaluate and make appropriate updates.  Implement, monitor and evaluate the system. • Phase 3: Engaging FE and HE: o Further develop strategies and systems to engage local FE/HE specialist providers with the automotive supply chain companies through practical implementation of the online support system. o Develop and implement a comprehensive programme of end-user training o Carry out pilots, evaluate and refine. o Implement, monitor and evaluate). • Phase 4: Evaluation, sustaining and embedding: o Evaluate progress and performance improvement. o Evaluate the project. o Develop and implement a business model for sustainability of the system. Technologies • The primary infrastructure is likely to be Moodle with other integrated technologies. • “Apps” will be applications/software that operate on the infrastructure e.g. self/learner diagnostics, discussions, digital literacy diagnostics, online badges, team diagnostics, skills-swap, “Trip Advisor” ratings of resources. • E-Resources will include learning materials, re-usable learning objects, case studies, OERs. Key project outputs and outcomes The overall output of the project will represent a model of an online resource to support supply chain companies: • A specification for a hosted open source ICT infrastructure. • A series of “apps” and resources applicable to all industry supply chains. • Resources to support implementation of the model focused around end-user preparation and “best practice” guides.
  3. 3. The overall outcomes of the project will be: • Increased engagement with learning by the automotive industry and supply chain companies, in the West Midlands and Wales. • A positive contribution towards the JLR Suppliers Training Group’s goals. • A model for online supply chain development and support. Evaluation as a key element of sustainability and capacity building As part of evaluating the impact of the project, the outcomes will demonstrate how it effectively piloted a mechanism to better articulate the skills needs to providers and hence contributed to sustainability. This applies equally to other sectors. Write how many words you have used in this section in this box: Section 3 (work plan and outputs) I have attached the requested document Attach a high level work plan (or a Gantt chart) which identifies the outputs and sets out key activities and dates to show how you will achieve the required objectives and deliverables expected in this call and its timescale. Type B and C projects (ie those above £15,000) should detail the work packages that will be undertaken (2 single sides of A4). YES Section 4 (engaging with the community and Jisc) Describe how your project will involve external organisations as appropriate and work with Jisc and use other resources, to evaluate the work, enhance the outcomes of the project and achieve wider dissemination and embedding of these outcomes. (700 words) Engaging with the automotive sector The project partners (Birmingham Metropolitan College, Coleg Sir Gâr and JLR) and stakeholders represent a broad range of external organisations including employers (vehicle manufacturers and supply chain companies in the West Midlands and South Wales) and will embrace other FE/HE education providers in these regions within Phase 2 of the project. A key member of the JLR team is on part-time secondment from the sector skills council, SEMTA, thus bringing their extensive employer-led expertise and knowledge of UK engineering and manufacturing skills needs and practices. Phase 3 of the project, as well as being focused on developing a sustainable business model, will also aim to scale-up the project within the UK as a whole, with a focus on geographical hubs such as the Northwest/Northeast and the South East of England which have key vehicle manufacturers as well as local supply chain companies. The project will engage (as part of Phase 3) with other sector bodies such as the Northwest Automotive Alliance (www.nwautoalliance.com) and the National Apprenticeship service (http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk) in order to explore possible synergies and collaborations. The project will work closely with SEMTA to ensure that its developments align with clearly identified skills development needs and how these link with productivity. Engaging with learners Learner engagement is a key concept being developed by FE/HE institutions and the project will seek to actively engage learners throughout the project to help shape the development and implementation of the Auto Share & Learn system and will draw on the Jisc Guide to setting up and implementing student partnerships. 800
  4. 4. Engaging with other sectors Phase 3 will also seek to establish motivation in other sectors for the model that has been developed. Likely sectors include construction, manufacturing and rail. In the latter case, the rail sector is also witnessing growth in manufacturing and subsequent need for rapid skills development e.g. with Hitachi Rail’s new construction plan (see http://www.hitachirailproject.co.uk). The project will seek initial guidance from BIS as to the key employers/employer & sector bodies to engage with and then work to motivate such sectors to adopt the model. Possible collaborations will also be explored. Engaging with Jisc The project team members/partners include many who have a great deal of experience of working on Jisc-funded programmes and are aware of the extensive resources available that have resulted as outputs from such programmes e.g. from the first phase of the FE and skills development and resources programme as well as having been actively involved in developing sector guides and toolkits such as the Work-based learning maturity toolkit, effective practice for critical friends, sustaining and embedding innovations good practice. Already established resources of interest include online resources to help engage adult learners, TechDis materials for accessibility and inclusion, digital literacy resources, resources to support mobile learning, apps to engage learners with their own planning and monitoring of time and workload. Resources in other Jisc programmes will be researched including those from the LLL-WFD, curriculum design/delivery, digital literacies, business & community engagement, distributed VLE, e-portfolio interoperability and OER programmes. Key resources to be researched will include the various Jisc InfoNet infoKits and practical tools e.g. cloud computing, collaborative online tools, costing technologies, embedding BCE and mobile learning. Dissemination and engagement activities The project will actively engage in partnership with Jisc in its dissemination and evaluation activities with a specific focus on sustainability e.g. through development of a business model and engaging other sectors. As well as engagement with employers, employer/sector bodies as described above, the project will seek to disseminate and engage as follows: • Conference papers – target 8 (e.g. ALT-C, Greenwich employer engagement conference, Wales Future Directions conference, QAA (Scotland) Enhancement Theme conference, Jisc conferences, HEA conferences, automotive sector/skills development conferences) • Jisc mail lists - engage with Jisc e-mail lists such as Jisc Employability. • Workshops – target three key workshops (England, Wales and Scotland). • Webinars – target three key webinars. • Case studies – target two broad case studies focused on the West Midlands and south Wales supply chain, with mini-case studies of individual companies of how they have benefited. • Publishing of the model and all supporting resources via an online wiki. Write how many words you have used in this section in this box: Section 5 (activity costs) I have attached the requested document All type A projects must complete (and attach) the activity costing template (Annex B). NO 690
  5. 5. Section 6 (budget) All type C and D projects (where the budget requested is over £15,000) must complete (and attach) the budget template (Annex C) YES Section 7 (risk assessment) Complete (and attach) the risk assessment template (Annex D) (1 single side of A4) YES Section 8 (project team) Provide information about the experience and capacity of the project team and any partners involved in the project. (2 single side of A4) YES Section 9 (letters of support) Attach letter(s) of support from a senior organisational manager/ (and any project partners) which describes how they and other relevant staff will engage in the project process. YES Terms and conditions of grant (project) I have read the Jisc terms and conditions of grant (project) available at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/fundingopportunities/terms-and-conditions-grant- project Tick the box to indicate you have read the T&Cs Attachments to be included with the completed proposal template are: • Activity costs for type A projects only (see template at Annex B) • Budget for type C and D projects only (see template at Annex C) • Risk assessment (see template at Annex D) √
  6. 6. Work-plan and outputs The work-plan consists of four key work-packages which are detailed in the Table below: WP Work-package Key activities Key outputs/outcomes Start End 1 Phase 1: Project set-up and research 1(a) Project set-up, management & stakeholder engagement • Kick-off meeting • Develop partnership agreements and contracts • Detailed project plan • Review/identify key stakeholders and develop stakeholder communications and engagement plan • On-going project management • On-going stakeholder communications and engagement (including with Jisc and the wider sector communities) • Shared understanding/documentation of project; governance arrangements, IPR/ownership, roles, responsibilities • Partner/advisor agreements and contracts • Detailed project plan including, budget and updated risk management • Stakeholder communications and engagement plan & its implementation • Regular review, meetings and updating of project plan On-going throughout project 1(b) Initial research, needs analysis & specification • Identify skills-learning-accreditation- business needs of VMs, supply chain companies, educational suppliers and other key stakeholders • Identify end-user technology access and digital literacies • Develop outline specification and seek approvals • Identify third-party resources (e.g. outputs from Jisc programmes (inc FE skills Phase 1), support tools, learning resources, OERs) • Develop detailed specification • Develop framework for measuring/evaluating business/learner performance improvement • Develop on-going project evaluation • Identify requirements for system management, security and privacy (including e.g. private areas) • Report detailing needs of key stakeholders together with constraints, issues, challenges. • Assessment of end-user technologies and digital literacies which will shape technology specification and end-user support, guidance and training. • Outline specification for technology infrastructure, apps, usability, accessibility, end-user technologies. • List of resources • Detailed specification for technology infrastructure, apps, usability, accessibility, end-user technologies. • Framework for measuring/evaluating business/learner performance improvement • Evaluation approach. • System management specification 02/14 04/14 2 Phase 2: Supplier engagement 2(a) System development • Develop mock-up/prototype and seek feedback from key stakeholders • Set-up hosted (cloud-based) infrastructure technologies (e.g. Moodle) including integration • Develop systems for monitoring of usage (& stats/reporting) • Develop Apps • Feedback on prototype. • Infrastructure set-up and integration of technologies • Systems to help evaluate usage • Apps 03/14 05/14 2(b) Preparation and orientation for pilots • Develop user guides and online training (e.g. using screencasts) • Define and develop support arrangements. • Develop induction programme (including feedback mechanisms). • User guides and training. • Agreed support. • Induction programme. 04/14 05/14
  7. 7. 2(c) Pilots & updates • Run induction programme • Pilot system and gain feedback (Wales and West Midlands) • Evaluate pilots and update system, guides, training etc. • End-users familiar with purpose and use of system • Understanding of user • Updated system, guides, training. 05/14 06/14 2(d) Implement system • Run induction programme • Roll-out system • Monitor usage and gain feedback and evaluate. • End-users familiar with purpose and use of system • Evaluation of usage 06/14 08/14 3 Phase 3: Engaging FE and HE 3(a) Further system development • Develop mock-up/prototype and seek feedback from key stakeholders • Further develop hosted (cloud-based) infrastructure technologies where needed • Develop systems for monitoring of usage (& stats/reporting) • Develop Apps • Feedback on prototype. • Refinement of infrastructure • Systems to help evaluate usage • Apps 07/14 09/14 3(b) Preparation and orientation for pilots • Develop user guides and online training (e.g. using screencasts) • Define and develop support arrangements. • Develop induction programme (including feedback mechanisms). • User guides and training. • Agreed support. • Induction programme. 09/14 10/14 3(c) Pilot & update • Run induction programme • Pilot system (Wales and West Midlands) and gain feedback • Evaluate pilots and update system, guides, training etc. • End-users familiar with purpose and use of system • Understanding of user • Updated system, guides, training. 11/14 12/14 3(d) Implement system • Run induction programme • Roll-out system • Monitor usage and gain feedback and evaluate. • End-users familiar with purpose and use of system • Evaluation of usage 12/14 2/15 4 Phase 4: Evaluation, sustaining and embedding • Evaluate use of system through surveys, focus groups. • Evaluate learning/performance/business improvement. • Develop business model of sustainability and support • Implement business model • Evaluation. • Evaluation. • Business model. • Implementation of business model. 2/15 6/15
  8. 8. Experience and capacity of project team and partners PARTNERS • Birmingham Metropolitan College Birmingham Metropolitan College is a large General Further Education College with campuses across the Birmingham, Black Country and Wyre Forest areas. The college has a large engineering and manufacturing faculty providing apprenticeship and higher education solution for SMEs and large organisations throughout the UK. JLR, BMW, Caterpillar, Samsung and Cadbury/Kraft are amongst the organisations engaged in the delivery of engineering training programmes. The college has been recognised for innovative and excellent delivery in achieving the following awards: Training Quality Standard – Engineering Manufacturing; Centre of Vocational Excellence – Computer Integrated Manufacturing; Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Further and Higher Education; TES FE 2011 Award for Outstanding Innovation in Teaching; AOC Beacon Award for Lifelong Learning; Edge Award for Practical Teaching and Practical Learning; AOC 2013 Beacon Award for College Engagement with Employers. • Jaguar Land Rover The current growth by Jaguar Land Rover anticipates an increase in supply chain jobs of 24,000 in the foreseeable future. The company has created a ‘supply training forum’ to share information, resources, best practice and employee training to ensure that the supply chain has the skills to meet all quality requirements. JLR have also engaged with seven relevant Local Enterprise Council’s to develop a common blue print with the aim to work collectively and collaboratively to address the skills challenges across these LEP areas. JLR won the ‘Education Award’ which recognizes businesses that are building sustainable partnerships with schools to raise aspirations of young people, to enable them to build successful working lives. Birmingham MET have recently taken over the Jaguar Land Rover Education Business Partnership Centres and are championing their community agenda and the delivery of Traineeships. • Coleg Sir Gâr Coleg Sir Gâr is a Further and Higher Education college in South West Wales with a large Engineering Faculty that supports the training needs of an extensive automotive supply chain network of companies in the region. It also works closely with TATA, the owners of JLR, which has a major manufacturing plant in Llanelli where the college is based. Tony Toole was Dean of Faculty of Engineering at the college for 15 years and the current Principal, Barry Liles, was (and remains) instrumental in developing the supply chain training support network in the area. The college therefore has extensive experience of manufacturing supply chain support. The college also has a well-established track record in the development and delivery of online distance learning courses and Technology Enhanced Learning innovation. It has been lead organisation for a large number of Jisc, Welsh Government and EU funded collaborative TEL projects. PROJECT TEAM All team members named below have confirmed their availability and capacity to contribute to the project. • Dr Julie Nugent – Project Board and Executive Sponsor (Birmingham Metropolitan College) Julie is Executive Director for Strategy and Development and has 20 years experience in education and economic development, and extensive experience in managing large scale, multi-million pound projects – including significant web-enabled, customer-focused solutions. Julie previously worked as Director of Funding for the Skills Funding Agency, supporting the creation of a single system for funding FE and Deputy Director for FE at the Department for Business and Innovation and is now Exec Director for Strategy and Development at BMet, overseeing internal transformation programmes, external partnerships and new opportunities. • Anthony Gribben-Lisle – Project Board and Project Director (Birmingham Metropolitan College) Anthony is Director of Technology and Innovation with 10 years’ experience in leadership and management roles in the Further Education sector, and 5 years working in product management and business consultancy roles for an FE software and services provider, Anthony has experience of IT Systems, ILT, business systems and management information across a wide range of FE environments. In addition, his experience as a senior manager in a number of FE colleges includes strategic leadership of marketing and business development
  9. 9. functions, employer and partner relationships, and quality improvement, ensure that solutions delivered from a technology perspective are targeted to support organisational objectives, and are focussed on high quality outcomes for learners. • Anthony Nicholls – Project Board and Project Manager (Birmingham Metropolitan College) Anthony is Head of Business Systems and has 20 years FE experience, across a range of IT and Information systems roles. A database and software development specialist, Anthony now heads up the Business and Online Systems team for the College, managing a portfolio of projects to harmonise, integrate and develop systems to meet business need. • Rita Davey – Project Board and Partner Lead (Jaguar Land Rover and SEMTA) Rita has 20 years experience in the Learning and Development sector where she has gained multi dimensional knowledge and experience addressing the skills needs of the manufacturing/engineering sector. This experience covers activity regionally and nationally through all sizes of employer’s. As curriculum leader at City College Birmingham she was responsible for all work based training. After leaving the college she worked on a number of manufacturing related projects such including Rover Task Force, Automotive Academy and National Skills Academy for Manufacturing. Rita developed regional trainer/assessor standards that were applied nationally. Rita is currently employed by SEMTA and is seconded to Jaguar Land Rover to lead their supplier engagement programme aiming to address their key skill challenges as a result of the recent and on-going Jaguar Land Rover growth. • Dave Howells – Project Board (Coleg Sir Gâr ) Dave is Director of Business Development and was previously Head of e-Learning at the college. He is responsible for training and consultancy services, partnership development and Innovation. Working with numerous partners and consultants across most sectors he is currently developing and delivering a range of new products and services to support the business sector in Leadership and Management, Construction, Manufacturing and ICT. • Dr Tony Toole – Project Board and Partner Lead (Coleg Sir Gâr ) Dr Tony Toole was Dean of Faculty of Engineering at Coleg Sir Gâr and then Director of Online Learning. He has successfully managed over 20 large-scale, collaborative and multi-institutional e-learning projects funded by Jisc, the Welsh Government and the EU. He has worked with Jisc as a Committee Member, Critical Friend and is a Board Member of Cetis. As Dean of Faculty he worked closely with manufacturing industry in the region, including their supply chain companies. Tony is a Visiting Professor at both the University of Wales Trinity Saint David and at the University of South Wales and works with both institutions as a consultant in the areas of Engineering, High Performance Computing, and Technology Enhanced Learning. • Dr Peter Chatterton – Project Board Dr Peter Chatterton has worked extensively in the area of HE/FE educational innovation (enabled through the use of new media/technologies) with a strong focus on employer engagement, partnerships and graduate employability. He has worked on over ten Jisc-funded projects in roles such as Critical Friend and Evaluator and has written many Jisc/QAA guides and toolkits. He has worked extensively with QAA, LFHE, HEA, HEFCW, Becta, LSIS and HEFCE. He has also been a consultant to the Ford Motor Company on flexible means to deliver HE programmes to employees as well as being a partner and board member in the Automotive College (a FE/HE/industry/DTI partnership) which designed and delivered learning/business improvement programmes to SMEs in the UK automotive supply chain. • Mark Stiles – Project Board and Project Evaluator Mark is Emeritus Professor of Technology Supported Learning, conferred by Staffordshire University. He was Professor of Technology Supported Learning at Staffordshire University from 2000 to 2012, leading a team which had corporate responsibility for eLearning and carried out work on strategy and policy for eLearning as well as many pedagogic and technical projects at national, regional and local levels, mostly funded by JISC. He is Chair of the new CETIS board, having been Chair of the JISC-CETIS Board for 5 years prior to reorganisation, and was Deputy Chair of the JISC Learning and Teaching Committee for 3 years. For the last 6 years he has represented JISC on the board of the IMS international standards body.
  10. 10. Annex C: Project Budget Amount Other information Staff costs (including on costs) Project Director (Senior Manager, 0.1FTE) £6,000 (matched funding) Birmingham Metropolitan College Project Management (Senior Manager, 2 x 0.2FTE) £24,000 Birmingham Metropolitan College and Coleg Sir Gâr Technical Systems Development (Systems Designer, 0.2FTE + Technical Support) £15,000 Birmingham Metropolitan College Training Materials Development (Academic Staff, 2 x 0.1FTE) £14,000 Birmingham Metropolitan College, Coleg Sir Gâr, JLR Implementation and Pilot Delivery (Academic Staff, 2 x 0.2FTE) £15,000 Birmingham Metropolitan College, Coleg Sir Gâr, JLR Evaluation and Embedding (Academic Staff, Management, 0.1 FTE) £4,000 Birmingham Metropolitan College, Coleg Sir Gâr, JLR Professional and Industry Based Project Support (External Consultants, 2 x 0.2FTE) £15,000 External Consultants, including SEMTA Non staff costs Travel and expenses £5,000 Primarily for company visits. Project meetings will be mainly online. Dissemination £2,000 Final dissemination event and conference costs. Evaluation £3,000 External evaluation Additional costs (specify) £3,000 web hosting, printing, telephone, etc. Overheads (provide breakdown) Institutional Staff overheads: 1.3FTE @ £13.53/hr (Funding Council Calculation) £26,000 Included in the institutional contribution figure below Total project costs £132,000 Total requested from Jisc £100,000 Organisational contribution £32,000 Contribution from institutional senior management and staff overheads.
  11. 11. Summary of the qualitative, and any quantitative, benefits your organisation will expect to receive from the project The qualitative benefits that both FE institutions will receive from the project outcomes will include: • Increased engagement with the manufacturing sector and its supply chain • Access to an online supplier support website to provide flexible and accessible support for the supply chain industries • An improved collaborative network that includes the FHE sector, SEMTA, and a range of manufacturing and supply chain companies • Greater experience in the use of online technologies to support skills based training that will be valuable and transferrable across industry sectors
  12. 12. Annex D: Risk Assessment Type of risk Probability of occurrence (1 Low-5 High) Severity of impact (1 Low - 5 High) Overall score (probability x severity) Action to prevent/mitigate the risk Conflicting needs of different stakeholders (Issues of confidentiality, IPR, contractual constraints etc) 2 2 4 The project planning process will include a partnership agreement that addresses all such issues. Difficulty in engaging SMEs (Access to supply chain information, consultation, agreement to participate in development and testing) 2 4 8 A clearly important issue that will be addressed through the early negotiation with JLR and an agreed selection of supply chain companies. A major attraction for the SMEs will be the rapid prototyping deliverable. Tight project time-scale (website design and development, testing with companies, evaluation) 1 4 4 The project partners are experienced and well placed to manage the project plan within the timescale specified. Technical development issues (Staff capacity, design experience, web hosting) 2 4 8 Capacity, experience and hosting arrangements have been discussed in project planning and appropriate arrangements agreed and budgeted for. Transferring the model (Transferrable format, IPR agreement, creative commons licensing etc) 1 4 4 As a Jisc funded project the outcomes will be designed to be made freely available to the community of practice. Identifying an appropriate business model for sustainability (Appropriate platform, cost effective operation, quality assurance plan, funding etc) 2 2 4 Sustainability will be central to the project planning process from the outset. Where open source software and cloud hosting is appropriate, this will be included. There is a strong indication of sustainability funding from companies. Key project team member leaves 2 3 6 The fact that there are two experienced and resourceful FE colleges involve in this bid means that there is significant capacity to address this issue if it were to occur.

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