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Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings
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Educ9701 s2 2014 week 1 readings

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This presentation forms the basis of a tutorial discussion about two core readings.

This presentation forms the basis of a tutorial discussion about two core readings.

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  • Cultural – Historical Activity Theory

    Ngambi discusses the CHAT theory and how using emerging technologies really has the potential to widen the learner’s acquisition of knowledge and skill through social and collaborative learning approaches. Well this what the paper was intended to research and find out.

    He makes these two questions the main focus of what his research is trying to put forward.

  • Transcript

    • 1. Week 1 Academic Dialogue Trudy Sweeney EDUC 9701 S2
    • 2. Introduction This presentation draws on the following two references:  Oliver, M. (2011).Technological determinism in educational technology research: Some alternative ways of thinking about the relationship between learning and technology. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27(5), 373-384.  Ng’ambi, D. (2013). Effective and ineffective uses of emerging technologies:Towards a transformative pedagogical model. British Journal of EducationalTechnology, 44(4), 652-661. doi:10.1111/bjet.1205
    • 3. Technological determinism & educational technology research  Oliver (2011) argues that “research on the educational uses of technology frequently over emphasizes the influence of the technology” (p. 373).  “The use of technology should not be understood to operate on a causal model: it does not have straight forward ‘impact’ in some some mechanical way on the practices that it encounters” (p. 381)
    • 4. Technological determinism & educational technology research  “A growing body of work argues for the need for the development of a critical perspective on educational technology use, one that looks beyond the immediate context of learning gains and patterns of interaction to question the ways in which technology has been taken up in the first place” (p. 373).  There is a need to focus on the social, political, economic, cultural and historical context within which educational technology is used (and not used).The purpose is not to reveal some claims about e- learning as being false or untruthful, but “call into question ways of talking about and justifying e-learning that obscure a more complicated reality (Freisen 2009, p. 181)” Cited in (Oliver, 2011, p. 374).
    • 5. Technological determinism  “If technology determines particular kinds of social effect, even if a ‘soft’ or technicist form, this raises important questions of power and morality. Such questions are not often asked of technology and learning yet, … the very idea of agency is called into question, particularly when technology is assumed to have the power to determine choices” (p. 375).  For example, technology has been bought on a massive scale often based on the assumption that it will cause improvements in learning outcomes. However, teachers can struggle to integrate these into their practice and marginalise its use so that effects are minimised (p.376).
    • 6. ActivityTheory: One position to consider the relationship between technology and action. AT builds on the work ofVygotsky and attempts to understand learning in terms of people’s intentional actions within social settings.At it’s core is the proposition that actions are mediated – the unit of analysis is of a subject (a person) working towards an object (objective) using a tool.
    • 7. Summary: It is not about the technology!  Avoid simplistic claims about the impact, effect and technical causation of technology and concentrate instead on descriptions of practice, accounts of purposeful action and negotiated meanings (p. 382).
    • 8. Discussion and Summary of the article:
    • 9. “This paper argues that pedagogically sound uses of ETs [emerging technologies] leverage the broader context of existing practices (cultural-historical context) to design learning activities that transform both the teaching and learning practices” (p. 652).
    • 10. Distributed intelligence: - Learner and technology interaction resulting in knowledge construction. - A widening of learners’ access to multiple perspectives using ETs. For example students sharing PowerPoint presentations or blog posts with peer comments; Twitter posts using a course hashtag; notes to co- created teaching resources.
    • 11. Distributed expertise: - Access to expert knowledge - Sharing knowledge/ideas to as a community of practice. - Distributed expertise can be seen as a sub-category of distributed intelligence which relates more directly to working practices. The collaborative and discursive construction of tasks, solutions, visions, breakdowns and innovations within and across systems. - Students accessed distributed expertise through listening to experts’ podcasts and used a Ning to engage with expert podcasters (p. 659).
    • 12. 1. Set an educational goal 2. Facilitate students to create something using ETs 3. Students present and record their creation 4. Students reflect on the last 2 processes 5. How might I use ETs next time? • Metacognition • Inquiry based learning • Student – centred learning • Collaboration • Bloom’s Taxonomy (knowledge  evaluation process)
    • 13. ETs have the potential to transform teaching and learning by fostering collaborative knowledge production by leveraging distributive intelligence and distributive expertise.
    • 14. Conclusion  “Technology should not be understood to operate on a causal model; it does not have a straight forward ‘impact’ in some simple, mechanical way on the practices it encounters” (Oliver, 2011, p. 381).  It is important adopt a critical view of the use of ICT for teaching and learning that involves questioning the very idea of agency, particularly when technology is assumed to have the power to determine choices.
    • 15. Discussion Questions  Question 1: Share one example of how is ICT has recently been used in your classroom and why?  Question 2: Why are some emerging technologies avoided by educators even though they have the potential to improve students’ learning?  Question 3: How could you leverage Ng’ambi’s notion of distributed intelligence and/or distributed expertise to use ICT in transformative ways?  Question 4: What are the major implications for Ng’ambi’s five-phase pedagogical guidelines?

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