Collaboration between libraries, archives and museums: Essential for maintaining relevance in the Digital Age

  • 1,928 views
Uploaded on

This is a presentation a gave on the topic of my Master\'s portfolio at UCLA in Nov 2009. Most of the content was spoken and not included in the slides, but you can still get the idea.

This is a presentation a gave on the topic of my Master\'s portfolio at UCLA in Nov 2009. Most of the content was spoken and not included in the slides, but you can still get the idea.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,928
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Collaboration between libraries, archives and museums: Essential for maintaining relevance in the Digital Age Teresa Soleau MLIS Candidate Fall 2009
  • 2. Libraries, Archives & Museums: differences •  Funding •  Relationship between •  Governance source and visitor •  Staffing communities •  Collections •  Large differences even •  Levels of description within sectors (e.g. The •  Metadata standards Met and San Diego Zoo are both museums) •  Use of collections •  Preparation of staff •  User needs
  • 3. Libraries, Archives & Museums: common mission collecting, preserving and providing access to artifacts and information about our cultural heritages
  • 4. Collaboration: 16 local museums with some museum objects online
  • 5. Collaboration: Out of 11 local museums with library or archives
  • 6. Collaboration: 2 show signs of metadata integration between collections
  • 7. Visible Web: 16 local museums with some museum objects online
  • 8. Visible Web: 8 have museum collections harvested by search engines
  • 9. Visible Web: 6 have OPACs
  • 10. Visible Web: 1 has an OPAC harvested by search engines
  • 11. Why does that matter?
  • 12. Why does that matter? •  Among the general public, 84% of information searches begin with a search engine (2005, OCLC report)
  • 13. Why does that matter? •  Among the general public, 84% of information searches begin with a search engine (2005, OCLC report) •  Among college students, only 2% begin an information search on a library Web site (2005, OCLC report)
  • 14. Why does that matter? •  Among the general public, 84% of information searches begin with a search engine (2005, OCLC report) •  Among college students, only 2% begin an information search on a library Web site (2005, OCLC report) •  Researchers are more likely to use library and bibliographic database searches but the use of Web search engines such as Google Scholar is almost as common (2007, Information Seeking Behavior of Academic Scientists)
  • 15. Google search for "los angeles" russian modernist art
  • 16. WorldCat.org: “find in your library” feature
  • 17. Recommendations
  • 18. Recommendations •  Disaffiliate metadata for resource discovery and resource description
  • 19. Recommendations •  Disaffiliate metadata for resource discovery and resource description •  Aggregate content
  • 20. Recommendations •  Disaffiliate metadata for resource discovery and resource description •  Aggregate content •  Optimize for search engines
  • 21. Thank you! •  Questions?
  • 22. References •  De Rosa, Cathy, et. al. 2005. Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources: A Report to the OCLC Membership. Dublin, Ohio: OCLC Online Computer Library Center. •  Bradley M. Hemminger et al. 2007. Information Seeking Behavior of Academic Scientists. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. v.58, no.14: 2205 – 2225.