Ccss and assessment_4_2013

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  • The Smarter Balanced next generation assessment system is designed to measure students’ learning of the important concepts, knowledge, and skills that form the Common Core State Standards. {+}The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects{+}and the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics represent a set of expectations for student knowledge and skills that high school graduates need to master to succeed in college and careers. Throughout the training modules, the Common Core State Standards are sometimes referred to as “the standards”.
  • To collect evidence about the wide range of assessment targets, Smarter Balanced will use a variety of item and task types. These item and task types fall into six broad categories and include{+}Selected Response items,{+}Constructed Response items,{+}Extended Response items, and{+}Performance Tasks.{+}In addition, there are two categories of technology-rich items and tasks known as Technology-Enabled{+}And Technology-Enhanced. Each of these item and task types will be explored in greater detail in the item and task type modules. But let’s take a brief look at each category now.
  • An item writer should consider creating these alternate selectedresponse items when, by doing so, the items provide more information about a student’s knowledge, skills, and abilities than can be gained through a traditional selectedresponse item.
  • This is a more complex selected-response item. This item has a stem, stimulus, and six options. {+}Like the previous item, the stem is the statement of the question to which the student responds and the options are possible answers the students must select from. {+}The stimulus is the text, source, and/or graphic about which the item is written. The stimulus provides the context of the item or task to which the student must respond. Here the student is provided with options in which more than one option is correct. {+}Unlike the prior item that had only one correct response, this item contains more than one option that is correct.
  • The scoring rubric describes how points are awarded for an item or task. The number of points a student can earn on a selectedresponse item will vary. {+}This item is worth two points. The student earns two points for selecting options B and D, 1 point for selecting only option B or only option D, and no points for any other combination of selections.
  • Let’s take a look at another way to format a non-traditional selectedresponse item. This item has a stem, multipleparts and two options for each part. {+}The stem directs students to decide whether or not the model in each part answers the question. There are 16 different ways to respond to this item making guessing the correct answer much less likely than for a traditional selected-response item.
  • The scoring rubric for this item indicates it is worth two points and points will be awarded based on the level of understanding a student demonstrates. The scoring rubric describes how points are awarded for an item or task.
  • Another format for a non-traditional selectedresponse item is to require students to match descriptions of a term or activity to a corresponding option. This is a technology-enhanced item and has a scoring rule instead of a scoring rubric. {+}The scoring rule determines how points are awarded. This item is worth two points and points will be awarded based on the level of understanding a student demonstrates. The scoring rule describes how points are awarded for an item or task.
  • Selected Response items prompt students to select one or more responses for a set of options. As an example, this item asks students to select the single best response.This type of selected response item is referred to as a multiple-choice item.
  • Constructedresponse items are brief open-response items that focus on a particular skill or concept. Constructedresponse items address assessment targets and claims that are of greater complexity, requiring more analytical thinking and reasoning than a selected response can elicit.
  • Unlike Performance Tasks and Extended Response items, which are the topic of another module, {+}constructed response items are designed to be administered during the computer-adaptive component of the assessment.{+}In order to score constructed response items quickly, automated scoring using artificial intelligence will be employed.{+} Most constructed-response items should take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete. {+}Some more complex items may take up to 10 minutes to complete.
  • Constructed response items prompt students to produce a text or numerical response in order to collect evidence about their knowledge or understanding of a given assessment target. As an example, this item asks students to produce a response that provides evidence about their ability to add and subtract.
  • All constructedresponse items are worth from 2 to 4 points. {+}Let’s take a look at an example of a 2 point constructedresponse item. {+}Like selectedresponse items, constructedresponse items have a stem and stimulus.
  • All constructedresponse items also include a scoring rubric and a sample top score. {+}The scoring rubric for each task should reflect the values set out for the claim being assessed, giving substantial weight to the choice of appropriate methods for solving the problem presented by the task, to reliable application of skills to develop a solution, and to explanations of what has been found. {+}The sample top score is an example of a complete and thorough top-score response. The language should model what is expected from a student at the grade level being assessed.
  • In some cases, the evidence required to support a claim about a given assessment target necessitates a more extended response. As an example, this item prompts students to provide evidence about their understanding of perimeter and area by producing an extended response.
  • The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium uses performance tasks to {+}measure complex targets from multiple claims that require analytical thinking, evaluation, and evidence that supports students’responses to texts. {+}Performance tasks provide a means for students to demonstrate their ability to think and to reason {+}and to use higher-order thinking skills to provide the required evidence for multiple claims and targets. {+}Students will produce a fully developed text or present a speech that will be scored according to an analytic rubric. {+}These kinds of tasks demonstrate the Smarter Balanced intent to collect evidence about students’ readinessfor college and career.
  • Performance tasks have many benefits. In addition to measuring higher-order thinking skills, {+}performance tasks allow for multiple approaches to collecting evidence of student knowledge, skills and abilities, {+}and the use of real world contexts. {+}Performance tasks effectively marry instruction and assessment, providing a common language around learning.
  • When developing performance tasks there are several guidelines to consider.{+}First, performance tasks are intended to require students to integrate knowledge and skills across multiple assessment targets and claims.{+}Through this integration, performance tasks should measure deep levels of understanding as well as the abilities to apply research skills, perform complex analyses, and provide evidence to support findings and arguments.{+}When measuring students’ writing skills, performance tasks must provide opportunities to plan, write, revise and edit an extended composition or text that is referred to as a “full write.”{+}To the extent possible, performance tasks should require students to work on real-world tasks that are relevant to students{+}and which allow them to demonstrate important knowledge and skills.{+}Performance tasks should also allow for multiple points of view and interpretation.{+}Finally, performance tasks must be feasible for administration in a typical classroom environment.
  • For each component of a performance, a variety of elements may be included. {+} As an example, stimulus can be presented in a variety of formats including reading passages, video or audio clips, images, and topics that require research or investigation.{+} Information processing may occur by having students research specific questions or by asking them to think about specific aspects of stimuli to which they were exposed.{+} Products and performances can also take many forms including essays, stories, reports, and speeches. A wide variety of performance tasks may be developed by combining various stimuli, information processing tasks, and products.{+}The number of stimuli to be used for a performance task differs across grade levels, from one or two at grade 3 to as many as five at the high school level.{+}While stimulus materials should include a wide range of informational pieces, heavy emphasis should be placed on material involving science, history, or social studies content or themes that are consistent with the Common Core State Standards.
  • Let’s take a moment to explore a sample performance task.{+} This performance task was designed for ninth grade and provides evidence for claim two assessment targets seven and nine, which focus on writing, as well as claim four assessment targets two, three, and four, which focus on research.As is shown, this task contains several sections.{+} First, there are the general directions.{+} Next, part 1 presents students with stimuli and some initial questions to consider related to the stimuli.{+} Part 2 then presents students with another prompt and asks them to produce an extended written response.{+} To inform students about what aspects of their writing will be scored, students are also provided with information about scoring.As is explored in a few minutes, the performance task also contains several scoring rubrics, each of which focus on a specific assessment target and claim.
  • Let’s take a closer look at each section of the performance task. The directions for this task are divided into three sections. {+}The first section provides a general overview of the task. {+}The second section then breaks the task down into three main steps. {+}Finally, specific directions are provided on the first step students are to take. While the directions for each task will vary, it is useful to break directions into smaller sections and to provide sufficient guidance to students about what they are expected to do as they work on the task.
  • Part one presents several stimuli for students to explore {+}and asks them to answer three questions. Each question is related to the topic explored in the stimuli, namely virtual schooling. As will be seen next, the questions are also related to the topic about which students will be asked to write during Part two.
  • Part 2 begins with another set of short directions {+}and then presents students with the main task. In this example, students are asked to produce an essay that explains why they agree or disagree with their parents’ idea regarding virtual schooling.
  • To help students focus their writing, the performance task also provides detailed information about the aspects of their writing that will be scored. In this example, five aspects of writing are described including the statement of purpose, organization, elaboration of evidence, language and vocabulary use, and writing conventions. Each of these aspects is associated with one or more assessment target.
  • Now, let’s look at another performance task. This task is designed for grade six. {+}Like the previous task, students are presented with stimuli and some initial questions to think about. {+}For part two, however, students are asked to give a five minute speech that presents information about a person they researched during part 1 and to explain why that person is a wonder. {+} Like the previous example, this task also provides information about how the student responses will be scored.
  • To guide the scoring of responses, scoring information is developed for each performance task. The scoring information takes two forms.{+}First, rubrics are developed for each element of the student response that is to be scored.{+}Second, sample or exemplar responses are provided.
  • As an example, this image shows the several rubrics developed for the ninth grade task examined earlier. {+}Note that a separate rubric was developed for each assessment target measured by the item.
  • The grade 9 and grade 6 performance tasks should serve as exemplars for the materials, information and structure of a performance task.{+}When developing performance tasks, it is important that each component is compatible with and relevant to all other components. Including resources that are interesting, but not directly relevant to the problem students are asked to explore should be avoided.{+}In addition, it is important that the sections of a task build on each other to scaffold the students’ production of a fully developed written response or speech. For example, in the grade 6 speech performance tasks, the outline prepares the student to give the speech. In contrast, asking students to create a drawing of the young wonder they researched, but which is not used to inform their writing would add little value to the task.{+}It is also important to develop a scoring rubric for each assessment target that is measured by a performance task. {+}And for each rubric, it is important to include one or more exemplars for each score point. To provide valid evidence about the range of claims and assessment targets measured by a performance task, it is important to put as much effort into developing the scoring materials as is invested in developing the task itself.{+}Finally, In addition to using authentic research in real-world context, look for ways to allow students to take multiple approaches to preparing the final product that will be scored. Following these guidelines will help ensure the performance tasks developed for the Smarter Balanced Assessment System are of high quality and are effective for eliciting evidence that supports the intended claims about student learning.
  • In still other cases, the evidence required to support a claim must be collected through a task for which a student performs multiple actions. For each action, a response is provided. The set of responses are then used to support a claim about student understanding or ability. In these cases, a Performance Task is necessary. A Performance Task is used to assess a set of assessment targets as opposed to a narrow focus on just one or two targets, as is typically the case with selected and constructed response items. As an example, this performance task contains multiple parts, each designed to collect specific types of evidence that are combined to make a claim about student ability to read, synthesize, and communicate in writing.There will be more about each type of item and task in separate modules.
  • Technology-enabled items {+}use media, such as video, animations, sound, or interactive tools to stimulate an assessment target. {+}Despite the use of these media types, a technology enabled item requires a student to provide either a selected response or a constructed response that consists of text and/or numbers.
  • The Smarter Balanced assessment system is designed to be administered on computers. For this reason, the assessment system aims to capitalize on the power of computers by employing technology rich items. Technology rich items fall into two broad categories, Technology-Enabled and Technology-Enhanced.{+} Technology-Enabled items make use of multimedia and interactive elements to stimulate the assessment target measured by an item. Technology-Enabled items either collect responses from students by requiring them to select one or more responses or by producing text or numerals. {+} As an example, this item plays a speech for students{+}and asks them to select an option in response to the prompt.Similarly, other items ask students to experiment with interactive tools, like a random sample generator, and then prompt them to produce text-based responses.In these examples, the technology enables the use of a media rich stimulus, but does not produce a new way of providing a response.
  • The Smarter Balanced assessment system is designed to be administered on computers. For this reason, the assessment system aims to capitalize on the power of computers by employing technology rich items. Technology rich items fall into two broad categories, Technology-Enabled and Technology-Enhanced.{+} Technology-Enabled items make use of multimedia and interactive elements to stimulate the assessment target measured by an item. Technology-Enabled items either collect responses from students by requiring them to select one or more responses or by producing text or numerals. {+} As an example, this item plays a speech for students{+}and asks them to select an option in response to the prompt.Similarly, other items ask students to experiment with interactive tools, like a random sample generator, and then prompt them to produce text-based responses.In these examples, the technology enables the use of a media rich stimulus, but does not produce a new way of providing a response.
  • Technology-enhanced items are computer delivered items thatrequire{+} specialized interactions students must perform to produce a response. Responses produced by a technology-enhanced item require students to do something other than write text or numbers, or select from among a set of options. {+}These items may also include digital media as the stimulus. {+}Technology-enhanced items should conform to the same essential requirements that we already discussed for writing quality selectedresponse and constructedresponse items. {+}The only difference is that they allow students to manipulate information in ways that are not possible with traditional selectedresponseand constructedresponse items.{+}Like selectedresponse items, technology-enhanced items have defined responses that can be scored in an automated manner.
  • In contrast,{+}a Technology-Enhanced item capitalizes on technology to collect evidence through a non-traditional response type. As an example,{+} this item presents a sonnet and prompts students to highlight evidence in the poem that reveal a change in the speaker’s message.
  • Similarly, this item asks students to produce a line to collect evidence about their understanding of proportional geometric relationships.In both cases, the response provided by the student is something different than selecting from a limited set of options or producing text or numbers.Smarter Balanced is committed to the use of technology to improve the quality of assessment. However, a Technology-Enabled or -Enhanced item will only be developed when it is the only way to access students’ understanding. More details about Technology-Enhanced items are provided in a separate module.
  • As a few examples, a technology enhanced item may require the student to {+}produce a line or a set of lines,{+} to draw a shape like an isosceles triangle or a rectangle with a specific area or perimeter, {+}to rearrange the order of numbers or expressions, {+}or to categorize geometric shapes, numbers, or expressions by dragging and dropping them.
  • There are several terms that are important to understand when developing technology enhanced items. The first term is Interaction Space.The interaction space is the area in which students interact with an item to produce a response. {+}This is the interaction space for an item that requires the student to draw a line, in this case to produce a line of symmetry. The interaction space is the area in which the student produces a line.{+}This is a different item that requires the student to drag and drop objects, in this case to classify shapes. The interaction space is the area in which students are able to select an object, drag that object, and then place the object in a new location.
  • When developing a technology enhanced item, the task model will indicate which type of interaction space you should use to allow students to produce a response. {+} As an example, the task model for this item specifies the use of the “single line” interaction space.
  • Technology enabled- and technology-enhanced items may both contain media elements that cannot be included with a paper-based test. {+}As an example, the technology-enabled item seenearlier asks students to use an interactive tool to explore a concept and to then select a response.{+}It is technology-enabled because it uses an interactive tool as part of its stimulus, but it requires the student to produce a traditional response type. {+}This technology-enhanced item also asks the student to use an interactive tool. However, this item also asks students to use the tool to produce their response, namely a line. Both items capitalize on technology by using an interactive tool.{+} The technology-enabled items require students to produce a traditional text-based response.{+} In contrast, the technology-enhanced item requires students to create a line. The scoring rule that accompanies the item then compares the line created by the student with the correct response.While the difference between the two item types may seem small, the new response type that distinguishes a technology-enhanced item has important implications for item writing.
  • Ccss and assessment_4_2013

    1. 1. Common Core State Standards & Assessment
    2. 2. Can you make all of these pancakes?
    3. 3. Does Jason knowBloom’s Taxonomy?
    4. 4. Common Core State Standards
    5. 5. Common Core Shifts for ELA/Literacy• Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction• Reading, writing and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational• Regular practice with complex text and its academic language
    6. 6. Common Core Shifts for Mathematics• Focus strongly where the Standards focus• Coherence: Think across grades, and link to major topics within grades• Rigor: In major topics, pursue conceptual understanding, procedural skill and fluency, and application
    7. 7. Common Core State Standards• Promote critical thinking skills• Challenge students by using the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy• Prompt the need for alternative assessments or higher level questions
    8. 8. By Kathy Schrockhttp://www.schrockguide.net/bloomin-apps.html
    9. 9. Animated Model of Learning Objectiveshttp://www.celt.iastate.edu/teaching/RevisedBlooms1.html
    10. 10. Reading and Writingin the Content Areas
    11. 11. Aiken County Public Schools Resources• http://acps.schoolfusion.us/-> Instruction and Accountability -> ACPS Curriculum• Log in information: – Username: USCA – Password: pacer2013
    12. 12. Assessment SmarterBalancedhttp://www.smarterbalanced.org/ 15
    13. 13. Six Item Types• Selected Response• Constructed Response• Extended Response• Performance Tasks• Technology-Enabled• Technology-Enhanced
    14. 14. Sample ItemsELA and Math• http://www.smarterbalanced.org/sample- items-and-performance-tasks/
    15. 15. Expert Groups• Work with your team.• Review the description of the assessment type. How is this similar/different to current assessment items?• Create at least 1 assessment item of this type for your grade level .• Share your item with the whole group.
    16. 16. Non-Traditional Selected Response Item
    17. 17. Non-Traditional Selected Response Item STIMULUS A multiplication problem is shown below. STEM 17 1712Which model(s) below could represent the the solution to problem? Which model(s) below could represent solution to this this problem?Select all that apply. Select all that apply.A. B. C. (1×1)+(1×7)+(1×2)+(2×7)D. E. F. (17×2)+(17×1)
    18. 18. Non-Traditional Selected Response ItemKey and Distractor Analysis:A. Does not understand how to model multiplication of two two-digit numbers using area models.B. CorrectC. Did not account for the values of the digits in the tens places.D. CorrectE. Did not understand that the 1 represents 10 in the multiplication problemF. Showed multiplication of 17 and (1 + 2) instead of 17 and 12Responses to this item will receive 0–2 points, based on the following:2 points: B, D1 point: Either B or D0 points: Any other combination of selections.
    19. 19. Non-Traditional Selected Response Item For numbers 1a – 1d, state whether or not each STEM figure has ⅖ of its whole shaded. 1a. 1b.MULTIPLE PARTS OPTIONS 1c. 1d.
    20. 20. Non-Traditional Selected Response ItemScoring Rubric:Responses to this item will receive 0–2 points,based upon the following:• 2 points: YNYN The student has a solid understanding of ⅖ as well as the equivalent form of ⅖.• 1 point: YNNN, YYNN, YYYN The student has only a basic understanding of ⅖. Either the student doesn‘t recognize an equivalent fraction for ⅖ or doesn‘t understand that all 5 parts must be equal-sized in figure 1b.• 0 points: YYYY, YNNY, NNNN, NNYY, NYYN, NYNN, NYYY, NYNN, NNNN, NYNY, NNYN, NNNY. The student demonstrates inconsistent understanding of ⅖ or answers “Y” to figure 1d, clearly showing a misunderstanding of what ⅖ means. Figure 1d is considered a “disqualifier “and an answer of “Y” to this part of the item would cancel out any other correct responses as “guesses” on the part of the student.
    21. 21. Non-Traditional Selected Response Item Scoring Rule:Match each shape below to itsname. Students who properly match the four shapes to their name will receive two points. Students who make two or three correct matches will receive partial credit of one point All other connections will receive a score of 0.
    22. 22. Selected Response Single Response – Multiple Choice Many experts will tell you that television is bad for you. Yet this is an exaggeration. Many television programs today are specifically geared towards improving physical fitness, making people smarter, or teaching them important things about the world. The days of limited programming with little interaction are gone. Public television and other stations have shows about science, history, and technical topics.Which sentence should be added to the paragraph to state the author’s main claim? A. Watching television makes a person healthy. B. Watching television can be a sign of intelligence. C. Television can be a positive influence on people. D. Television has more varied programs than ever before.
    23. 23. Constructed Response ItemsAddress assessment targets and claims that are of greater complexityRequire more analytical thinking and reasoning
    24. 24. Administration of Constructed Response Items• Administered during the computer-adaptive component• Scored using artificial intelligence• Most constructed response items take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete• Some more complex items may take up to 10 minutes to complete
    25. 25. Constructed ResponseThe table below shows the number of students in each third-grade classat Lincoln School. Students in Third-Grade Class Number of Students Mrs. Roy 24 Mr. Grant 21 Mr. Harrison 22 Ms. Mack 25There are 105 fourth-grade students at Lincoln School. How many morefourth-grade students than third-grade students are at Lincoln School?Show or explain how you found your answer.
    26. 26. Components of a Constructed Response ItemA teacher asked her students to use estimation to decide if thesum of the problem below is closer to 4,000 or 5,000. 496 + 1,404 + 2,605 + 489 = STIMULIOne student replied that she thinks the sum is closer to 4,000. Sheusedthe estimation shown below to support her reasoning. STEMIs the student’s reasoning correct? In the space below, use numbersand words to explain why or why not. If the student’s reasoning isnot correct, explain how she should have estimated.
    27. 27. Components of a Constructed Response ItemSample Top-Score Response:The student’s reasoning is incorrect. She was rounding to thethousands place. She had 2 numbers that were less than500, and she decided to round these numbers to 0. This is likesaying these numbers were not in the problem at all. She needsto account for these two numbers. Together, they have a sum thatis very close to 1,000. I think adding 1,000 + 1,000 + 3,000 is abetter strategy. This means the sum is closer to 5,000 than to4,000. Scoring Rubric: Responses to this item will receive 0–2 points, based on the following: 2 points: Student has thorough understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is incorrect and provides reasoning that shows a better estimation strategy. 1 point: Student has partial understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is incorrect, but alternate estimation strategy is also flawed. 0 points: Student has little or no understanding of how to estimate and how improper estimation can lead to flawed reasoning. Student states that the student in the scenario used reasoning that is correct.TOP-SCORE SCORING RUBRIC
    28. 28. Constructed Response Extended ResponseMs. McCrary wants to make a rabbit pen in a section of her Pen 1: Pen 2:lawn. Length: (feet, square feet) Length: (feet, square feet)Her plan for the rabbit pen includes the following: Width: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet) • It will be in the shape of a rectangle. Area: (feet, square feet) Area: (feet, square feet) • It will take 24 feet of fence material to make. • Each side will be longer than 1 foot. Pen 3: • The length and width will measure whole feet. Length: (feet, square feet) Width: (feet, square feet)Part A Area: (feet, square feet)Draw 3 different rectangles that can each represent Ms.McCrary’s rabbit pen. Be sure to use all 24 feet of fence Part Bmaterial for each pen. Ms. McCrary wants her rabbit to have more than 60 square feet of ground area inside the pen. She finds that if she uses the side of her house as oneUse the grid below. Click the places where you want the of the sides of the rabbit pen, she can make the rabbit pen larger.corners of your rectangle to be. Draw one rectangle at a time. If • Draw another rectangular rabbit pen.you make a mistake, click on your rectangle to delete it. • Use all 24 feet of fencing for 3 sides of the pen.Continue as many times as necessary. • Use one side of the house for the other side of the pen. • Make sure the ground area inside the pen is greater than 60 square feet. Use the grid below. Click the places where you want the corners of your rectangle to be. If you make a mistake, click on your rectangle to delete it.Use your keyboard to type the length and width of each rabbitpen you draw. Then type the area of each rabbit pen. Be sureto select the correct unit for each answer. Use your keyboard to type the Length: (feet, square feet)[Students will input length, width, and area for each rabbit pen. length and width of each rabbit pen Width: (feet, square feet)Students will choose unit from drop down menu.] you draw. Then type the area of Area: (feet, square feet) each rabbit pen. Be sure to select the correct unit for each answer.
    29. 29. Performance Tasks• Performance tasks challenge students to apply their knowledge and skills to respond to real-world problems. They can best be described as collections of questions and activities that are coherently connected to a single theme or scenario. These activities are meant to measure capacities such as depth of understanding, research skills, and complex analysis, which cannot be adequately assessed with selected- or constructed-response items.• Performance tasks in reading, writing, and mathematics will be part of the Smarter Balanced summative, year-end assessment. Performance tasks can also be administered as part of the optional interim assessments throughout the year. The performance tasks will be delivered by computer (but will not be computer adaptive) and will take one to two class periods to complete.
    30. 30. Performance Tasks• Measure complex assessment targets• Demonstrate ability to think and reason• Higher-order skills• Produce fully developed writing or speeches• Provide evidence of college and career readiness
    31. 31. Performance Tasks Benefits• Multiple approaches• Use real world contexts• Common language around learning
    32. 32. General Guidelines for Developing Performance Tasks• Integrate knowledge and skills• Measure understanding, research skills, analysis, and the ability to provide relevant evidence• Require student to plan, write, revise, and edit• Reflect a real-world task• Demonstrate knowledge and skills• Allow for multiple points of view• Feasible for classroom environment
    33. 33. Design of Performance Tasks Use 1-2 Stimuli for Grade 3. Use up to 5 stimuli for high school. Emphasis on stimuli related to science, history, and social studies.Components of a Performance Task Stimulus Information Processing Product/Performance Readings Research questions Essay, report, story, Video clips Comprehension script Audio clips questions Speech with/without Simulated Internet graphics, other media Graphs, charts, other visuals search Responses to etc. embedded Research topic/issue/ constructed response problem questions. etc. etc.
    34. 34. Sample Performance Task
    35. 35. Directions
    36. 36. Part 1
    37. 37. Part 2 z
    38. 38. Scoring Information• How your essay will be scored: The people scoring your essay will be assigning scores for: – Statement of purpose/focus—how well you clearly state your claim on the topic, maintain your focus, and address the alternate and opposing claims – Organization—how well your ideas logically flow from the introduction to conclusion using effective transitions, and how well you stay on topic throughout the essay – Elaboration of evidence—how well you provide evidence from sources about your opinions and elaborate with specific information – Language and Vocabulary—how well you effectively express ideas using precise language that is appropriate for your audience and purpose – Conventions—how well you follow the rules of usage, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling
    39. 39. Grade 6 Sample Performance Task
    40. 40. Scoring Criteria• Scoring rubrics• Sample response and scoring notes
    41. 41. Scoring Criteria
    42. 42. Guidelines for Writing Performance Tasks• Align parts of the task• Parts build to “full write” or speech• Develop rubric for each assessment target• Develop exemplars for each rubric• Allow multiple approaches
    43. 43. Performance TaskStudent Directions:Part 1 (35 minutes) QuestionsYour assignment: Use your remaining time to answer the 3. Explain how the information presentedYou will read a short story and article, questions below. Your answers to these in the “Virtual High School Interview”watch a video, review research statistics, questions will be scored. Also, they will video and the article “Virtual Schoolsand then write an argumentative essay help you think about the sources you’ve Not for Everyone” differs from theabout your opinion on virtual schools. read and viewed, which should help information in the research statistics? you write your essay. You may click on Support your answers with details fromSteps you will be following: the appropriate buttons to refer back to the video and the articles.In order to plan and compose your essay, the sources when you think it would beyou will do all of the following: Part 2 (85 minutes) helpful. You may also refer to your notes.1. Read a short story and article, watch a Answer the questions in the spaces You will now have 85 minutes to review video, and review research statistics. provided below them. your notes and sources, and to plan, draft,2. Answer three questions about the and revise your essay. You may also refer sources. 1. Analyze the different opinions to the answers you wrote to the questions in3. Plan and write your essay. expressed in “The Fun They Had” and part 1, but you cannot change those the “Virtual High School Interview” answers. Now read your assignment andDirections for beginning: video. Use details from the story and the information about how your essay willYou will now read the sources and watch the video to support your answer. be scored, then begin your work.a video. Take notes, because you maywant to refer back to your notes while 2. What do the statistics from “Keeping Your Assignmentwriting your essay. You can refer back to Pace with K–12 Online Learning” Your parents are considering having youany of the sources as often as you like. suggest about the current trends of attend a virtual high school. Write an• (short story) virtual schools in the U.S.? Use details argumentative essay explaining why you• (article 1) from the charts to support your answer. agree or disagree with this idea. Support• (video) your claim with evidence from what you• (research statistics) have read and viewed.
    44. 44. Technology-Enabled Items• Digital Media • Response Types – Video – Selected – Animation – Constructed – Sound – Interactive tools
    45. 45. Technology-Enabled Selected or Constructed Responses that include MultimediaBrianna is running for class president. She needs to give a speech to the 4th grade class.Listen to the draft of her speech and then answer the questions that follow. (Test-takers listen to an audio version of the following speech.) “Hi, My name is Brianna. I am running for class president, and I hope you will vote for me. You know many of my friends said they would. I am involved in many activities, including track and theater. If I am elected, I will hold several fundraisers so that all students in the 4th grade can go on a trip at the end of the year. Also, we can donate a portion of the money to a charity of our choice. If you want a class president who will work hard for you and listen to your needs, please vote for me next week!”This speech needs to be revised before the student presents it.Which sentence should be omitted to improve the speech. A. I am running for class president, and I hope you will vote for me. B. You know many of my friends said they would. C. If I am elected, I will hold several fundraisers so that all students in the 4th grade can go on a trip at the end of the year. D. If you want a class president who will work hard for you and listen to your needs, please vote for me next week!”
    46. 46. Technology-EnabledSelected or Constructed Responses that include Multimedia
    47. 47. Technology-Enhanced Items• Specialized interaction• May have digital media for stimulus• Same requirements as selected and constructed response items• Students manipulate information• Defined responses
    48. 48. Technology-EnhancedCollects Evidence through a Non-Traditional Response
    49. 49. Technology-Enhanced Collects Evidence through a Non-Traditional ResponseThe value of y is proportional the the value of x. The constant of proportionality forthis relationship is 1. On the grid below, graph this proportional relationship.
    50. 50. Technology-Enhanced ItemsDraw a line of symmetry The graph on the rightthrough shows a triangle. Drawthe figure below. the triangle after it is reflected over the y-axis. Classify each shape below based whether it contains at least one pair of parallel sides.Reorder the fractions below so thatthey are ordered from smallest tolargest.3/53/42/61/22/3
    51. 51. Key Components of a Technology- Enhanced ItemDraw a line of symmetry Classify each shape below based on whether itthrough contains at least one pair of parallel sides.the figure below. INTERACTION SPACE
    52. 52. Key Components of a Technology- Enhanced ItemDraw a line of symmetrythroughthe figure below.
    53. 53. Comparing Technology-Enabled and Technology-Enhanced ItemsGregory is installing tile on a rectangular floor.• He is using congruent square tiles that each have a side length of ½ Draw a line of symmetryfoot. through• The area of the floor is 22 square feet. the figure below.• The width of the floor is 4 feet.Use the grid and the tile below to model the floor.What is the length, in feet, of the floor? 5.5 feet
    54. 54. Additional Resources• http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=611058• Access Key: CCSS_and_Assessment
    55. 55. Additional Resources• SC Department of Education – CCSS Support Site http://scde.mrooms.org/index.php?page=27424• Ohio Department of Education http://education.ohio.gov/GD/Templates/Pages/ODE/ODEDetail.aspx?Pag e=3&TopicRelationID=1704&Content=132157 64

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