Challenging the Chip:  Labor rights and environmental justice in the           global electronics industry Organizing and ...
Valley of Heart’s Delight
Transition from Valley of Hearts    Delight to Silicon Valley• In the 1970s, farming and the canning and  food packaging i...
Unions   Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers                   by David Bacon     http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04...
Unions   Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers                   by David Bacon     http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04...
Unions  Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers                  by David Bacon    http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04hit...
History of organizing for better conditions• In the mid 70s, a small group of people started  meeting to discuss concerns ...
History of organizing for better conditions• Organized an effort to ban the use of TCE• Santa Clara Center for Occupationa...
History of organizing for better conditions• Another early SCCOSH project was  Injured Workers United, a support group  fo...
CAL OSHA report in 1981
Toxic Trouble in Silicon Valley           Newsweek 1984
New York Times –  November 10, 1984
AMRC Handbook - 1985
The Reality of            High Tech Impact• Semiconductor workers experience illness  rates 3 times greater than manufactu...
Toxic Components in        electronic products• Solvents, acids, photoresists, gases, etc used to  make chips, disk drives...
Clean rooms and              miscarriages   “ new concerns … may prove a potential black eye   for a high technology indus...
Chip plants not safe in Scotland               Wall Street Journal                 October 5, 1998• SEMICONDUCTOR PLANTS A...
IBM Corporate Mortality File         http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1626450• IBM maintained records of 30,000...
IBM settles chemical suit             January 23, 2001 Case involved              microchip site workers son•   By Craig W...
Clean rooms and dirty secretsMajor malformations typically occur in 1-2% of US live births; 5-10% are CNS malformations. T...
Clouds in Silicon Valley                New York Times               September 8, 2003                 By Bob Herbert“The ...
Practice precaution: close the gapbetween environmental and workplacePELS68 chemicals known to the State of California toc...
Workplace PELS (if any) for carcinogens and developmental toxics are much weaker than          environmental standards•If ...
Without health-protective PELSas well, better hazardcommunication, greenchemistry campaigns, and thethreat of after-the-fa...
Env. STDD              Yield in                     Best OCC STDD   Best Env. STDD  Toxic Agent                           ...
ALLIANCE @ IBM                   DEMANDS* Health surveillance of all IBM workers* reduce exposures to toxic substances NOW...
Early OSH publications
Suzanne RubioDied of breast cancer age 39  IBM semiconductor worker. Exposed to organic solvents,   uncured epoxy resins, ...
Lucy Kneebone  Died of stomach cancer age 35IBM assembly worker. chronic exposure to organic solvents,    uncured epoxy re...
Joanne GomezDied of breast cancer age 33IBM assembly worker Exposed toorganic solvents, uncured epoxy             resins
From Silicon Glen to Silicon Valley:   Helen Clark & Jim McCourt
The wake up call !!    The Fairchild Case --Groundwater pollution in Silicon    Valley poisons families
Labor unions were central to SVTC
Right-to-Know Timeline1976 - USA Worker Right-to-Know (RTK)  Law Enacted  – Guarantees worker access to workplace    chemi...
Right-to-Know Timeline1984 - CA adopts Leaking Underground  storage Tank Law  – Monitor industrial chemical leaks & clean-...
TRI Releases for 2007           for Selected Electronics Companies                                             Total On-si...
The footprint of high-tech      development
Moore’s Law
Activists Chide Dell Computer           Recycling
Apple Campaign
Inside an iPhone
Inside your iPhone
Our movement expands as   Industry moves out of S.V.Global High-Tech Production is    Undergoing the Largest  Industrial E...
We are undergoing the “Largest industrial transition in history”• 127 new fabs  – Total exceeds $115 billion  – $1- 3 bill...
High Tech manufacturing is global      Electronics factory in China
The scale is staggeringOver 500,00 workers at Foxconn in China
Electronics Supply Chain       Research done by Sarah Boyd
Taiwan: Workers Link Cancer to RCA Plant                   by Matthew Yi, San Francisco Chronicle                         ...
RCA Workers in Taiwan
E-Waste Dumped in Guiyu, China
Women sorting wires to burn in China
Burning E-Waste in Guiyu, China
Woman breaking a CRT monitor in China
A Chinese child sits amongst a pile of wires and e-waste. Children can often be found dismantling e-waste containing many ...
E-Waste problems continue• Wired for gold - (China Daily)•   Updated: 2011-11-16 07:59•   By Cheng Anqi and Erik Nilsson• ...
The Digital DumpA new report on e-waste dumping in Africa      by the Basel Action Network            October 24, 2005
Global e-waste dumping
E-Waste and Clean ProductionConference in Bejing – April 2004
Eco-Waste activists in Manila
Waste Not Asiain Kerala, 2007
Farmers and fishermen protest high-tech pollution in Taiwan
Recent studies from Taiwan• Increased standardized incidence ratio  of breast cancer in female electronics  workers• Tzu-I...
Recent studies from TaiwanSung TI, Wang JD, Chen PC. Increased risks of infantmortality and of deaths due to congenital ma...
Summary of Occupational      Illness in Korean electronics                (compiled by Dr. Kong of SHARPS)                ...
Environmental Challenges andTransparency in China    For more info    www.ipe.org.cn        Ma Jun   02/11/2011
与31家信息通信产业的互动Interaction with 31 ICT Brands
KEY FINDINGS 5: BRANDS TURNED PROACTIVE                             Checks on                              Use of Public I...
International Campaign for    Responsible Technology             (ICRT)Global Symposium on Strategies for a    Sustainable...
Activists gather at First Symposium       on Global Strategies for aSustainable High-Tech Industry   - 2002
International Campaign for       Responsible Technology                (ICRT)              Mission Statement,           ad...
Soesterberg PrinciplesElectronic Sustainability Commitment  Each new generation of technical  improvements in electronic p...
Forward to               Challenging the Chip• “We need a lot more “people’s histories” like those in this  book. The stor...
ICRT delegation visitsNational Semiconductor
Book tour at Beijing University
Consumer Education:          The Story of Stuff & The Story of Electronics•   What is the Story of Stuff?    From its extr...
UN expert meeting charts the way forward on    hazardous chemicals in electronic products Historic meeting addresses entir...
Delegates to Vienna SAICM  Meeting – March 2011
Key Recommendations from        SAICM in ViennaDelegates developed key recommendations:• eliminating chemical hazards duri...
Strategic ImportanceRecognizing that many challenges need to be resolved through improved design of new products, recommen...
Priority – Reduce Exposure to     Hazardous SubstancesThe producers and manufacturers should prioritize  reduction of expo...
Early Warning Systems• Producers and manufacturers should cooperate with  government, non-governmental organizations, trad...
Health Surveillance•   Producers and manufacturers, with oversight by the government and the full    participation of work...
Need for Fair CompensationGovernments are encouraged to develop and implement  effective liability and compensation legisl...
What about EICC?Key critique by Good Electronics:  – EICC code is not sufficiently aligned with international    labour st...
Key Points from the ANROEV Electronics Workshop                  Jaipur India Nov 17,2001• Broadening our electronics netw...
Ted Smith Biography•   founder and former Executive Director of Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition.•   co-founder and Chair o...
For Further Information:                        Ted Smith –   International Campaign for Responsible Technology &         ...
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011
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Ted ppt presentation for global production workshop in guangzhou draft final dec 2011

  1. 1. Challenging the Chip: Labor rights and environmental justice in the global electronics industry Organizing and Advocacy for Health and Environmental Justice in the High-Tech IndustryPresented at Global Production, Economic Development, and labor standards in the Information Technology Industry Guangzhou, China December, 2011 Ted Smith, Founder, Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition; Electronics TakeBack Coalition; and International Campaign for Responsible Technology www.icrt.co
  2. 2. Valley of Heart’s Delight
  3. 3. Transition from Valley of Hearts Delight to Silicon Valley• In the 1970s, farming and the canning and food packaging industries started to move away• A new industry started to grow up based on new technologies – it became known as the high tech electronics industry and produced semiconductors, printed circuit boards, disk drives and computers
  4. 4. Unions Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers by David Bacon http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04hitec1.htm• From the beginning, high tech workers had to face an industry-wide anti-union policy. Robert Noyce, who participated in the invention of the transistor, and later became a co-founder of Intel Corp., declared that "remaining non-union is an essential for survival for most of our companies. If we had the work rules that unionized companies have, wed all go out of business. This is a very high priority for management here. We have to retain flexibility in operating our companies. The great hope for our nation is to avoid those deep, deep divisions between workers and management which can paralyze action."
  5. 5. Unions Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers by David Bacon http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04hitec1.htmThe First Effort - Organizing Semiconductor Workers• The historic base for organizing activity among the high tech workforce for many years were the workers in the semiconductor plants. Starting in the early 1970s, workers began to form organizing committees affiliated to the UE in plants belonging to National Semiconductor, Siltec, Fairchild, Siliconix, Semimetals, and others. Most of these were semiconductor manufacturing plants, or factories which supplied raw materials to those plants.• By the early 1980s, the UE Electronics Organizing Committee had grown to involve a signed-up core membership of over 500 workers, who were participants in a number of union campaigns.
  6. 6. Unions Organizing Silicon Valleys High Tech Workers by David Bacon http://dbacon.igc.org/Unions/04hitec1.htm• Eventually the semiconductor manufacturers, especially National Semiconductor, fired many of the leading union activists, and the committee gradually dispersed as its members sought work where they could find it. The main strategic question which the committee sought to answer remains unresolved.
  7. 7. History of organizing for better conditions• In the mid 70s, a small group of people started meeting to discuss concerns over the chemical- handling aspects of the semiconductor industry and what might be done to raise these issues publicly. The group was called ECOSH, Electronics Committee for Occupational Safety and Health. ECOSH members included electronics workers, occupational nurses, attorneys, industrial hygienists, engineering and medical students, labor, environmental and religious leaders.
  8. 8. History of organizing for better conditions• Organized an effort to ban the use of TCE• Santa Clara Center for Occupational Safety and Health (SCCOSH) was formally organized in 1978. ECOSH continued as a SCCOSH project into the early 1980s, gaining recognition for a vigorous and largely successful campaign to ban TCE as well as energetic support and advocacy for many workers trying to win better conditions for themselves and co-workers.
  9. 9. History of organizing for better conditions• Another early SCCOSH project was Injured Workers United, a support group for workers already affected by chemical exposures, trying to secure fair compensation, decent medical care and retraining. The Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition (SVTC) also started out as an early project of SCCOSH in 1982.
  10. 10. CAL OSHA report in 1981
  11. 11. Toxic Trouble in Silicon Valley Newsweek 1984
  12. 12. New York Times – November 10, 1984
  13. 13. AMRC Handbook - 1985
  14. 14. The Reality of High Tech Impact• Semiconductor workers experience illness rates 3 times greater than manufacturing workers in other industries• In 3 epidemiological studies, women who worked in fabrication rooms were found to have rates of miscarriage of 40% or more above non-manufacturing workers• Silicon Valley has more EPA Superfund sites than any other area in the USA
  15. 15. Toxic Components in electronic products• Solvents, acids, photoresists, gases, etc used to make chips, disk drives, etc• Lead and cadmium in circuit boards• Lead in CRT monitors• Brominated flame retardants on printed circuit boards, cables and plastic casing• Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) cables• Mercury switches, flat screens
  16. 16. Clean rooms and miscarriages “ new concerns … may prove a potential black eye for a high technology industry that … sought to portray itself as clean and with little impact on the environment.Women exposed to certain chemicals … in the nation’s semiconductor factories face a significantly higher risk of miscarriage, a broad industry-financed study has found. The study is the 3rd in 4 years to find that … glycol ethers have toxic effects. “ Oct 12 and Dec. 4, 1992
  17. 17. Chip plants not safe in Scotland Wall Street Journal October 5, 1998• SEMICONDUCTOR PLANTS ARENT SAFE AND CLEAN By BILL RICHARDS Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL• GREENOCK, Scotland -- At the Inverclyde Advice and Employment Rights Center here, two dozen women crowd around a table. In angry Scottish burrs, they recite a litany of medical problems: cancers, birth defects, multiple miscarriages.
  18. 18. IBM Corporate Mortality File http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1626450• IBM maintained records of 30,000 workers that identified cause of death over 30 years• Records were analyzed by Dr. Richard Clapp, epidemiologist at Boston Univ.• Breast cancer deaths in women at IBM were 2.42 times the expected number• Similar findings for brain cancer, kidney cancer, non-Hodgikins lymphoma
  19. 19. IBM settles chemical suit January 23, 2001 Case involved microchip site workers son• By Craig Wolf Poughkeepsie Journal A lawsuit described as the first to test claims that chemicals in a microchip plant could be harmful to people has been settled, the parties said Monday. IBM Corp. and attorneys for Zachary Ruffing, a 15-year-old whose parents both had worked in the 1980s at IBMs East Fishkill plant, confirmed that an agreement had been reached.• Settlements typically involve payment by the defendant. Neither side would disclose what IBM or two chemical companies involved in the suit would pay.• IBM said human factors played a role in the decision. It still denies guilt.• I think its an enormously important case, partly because of the really serious damage suffered by Zach Ruffing and his family, and partly because this is the first major test case of its kind involved the high-tech industry, said Ted Smith, executive director of the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition in San Jose, Calif.
  20. 20. Clean rooms and dirty secretsMajor malformations typically occur in 1-2% of US live births; 5-10% are CNS malformations. Thus, in 1000 live births 1-2 CNS malformations and under .5 hydrocephaly cases expected.From 1980-89 <1000 children were born to clean room workers at 2 IBM sites with high miscarriage rates. At least three were born with hydrocephaly. Other CNS defects found in the group include spina bifida and microcephaly
  21. 21. Clouds in Silicon Valley New York Times September 8, 2003 By Bob Herbert“The pristine environment is for thesake of the products, which can beruined by even a speck of dust. At thesame time, the hazardous chemicalsused in the process are capable ofdoing devastating physical damage tothe workers.”http://www.computertakeback.com/news_and_resources/clouds_sv.cfm
  22. 22. Practice precaution: close the gapbetween environmental and workplacePELS68 chemicals known to the State of California tocause cancer or reproductive harm are totallyunregulated by Cal-OSHA or regulated only for non-cancer effectsThere is a huge disparity between workplace andenvironmental protections against carcinogens anddevelopmental toxicants everywhere.
  23. 23. Workplace PELS (if any) for carcinogens and developmental toxics are much weaker than environmental standards•If the air you breathe at work contains 1 ppmbenzene, you are getting over 500 times thedosage set by EPA to protect the mostvulnerable level of benzene with every breathyou take (industrial health standards are notset to prevent birth defects in workers kids)•If you breathe1 ppm of benzene at work, ittakes only 166 hours to get a complete lifetimedose (using the federal public health exposurelimit. )
  24. 24. Without health-protective PELSas well, better hazardcommunication, greenchemistry campaigns, and thethreat of after-the-fact liabilityare just not enough to preventtoxic harm to workers and theiroffspring in the first place.
  25. 25. Env. STDD Yield in Best OCC STDD Best Env. STDD Toxic Agent converted to 8 improved worker 8 hr. TWA NSRL or MCL hr. TWA protection 1 part per Benzene 7 ug/day 1 part per billion 1,000:1 million TCE 25 ppm 80 ug/day 7 ppb 3,571:1 Perc 25 ppm 14 ug/day .3 ppb 8,333:1Methylene Chloride 25 ppm 0.005 mg/L 1 ppb 25,000:1
  26. 26. ALLIANCE @ IBM DEMANDS* Health surveillance of all IBM workers* reduce exposures to toxic substances NOW as part of transition to non-toxic substances in all processes* States compile and publish cancer maps of areas around computer manufacturing plants where employees are likely to reside.* fund to alleviate medical burden on affected IBM employees and their families.
  27. 27. Early OSH publications
  28. 28. Suzanne RubioDied of breast cancer age 39 IBM semiconductor worker. Exposed to organic solvents, uncured epoxy resins, anduncured photoresists containing glycol ethers, xylene, n-butyl acetate
  29. 29. Lucy Kneebone Died of stomach cancer age 35IBM assembly worker. chronic exposure to organic solvents, uncured epoxy resins
  30. 30. Joanne GomezDied of breast cancer age 33IBM assembly worker Exposed toorganic solvents, uncured epoxy resins
  31. 31. From Silicon Glen to Silicon Valley: Helen Clark & Jim McCourt
  32. 32. The wake up call !! The Fairchild Case --Groundwater pollution in Silicon Valley poisons families
  33. 33. Labor unions were central to SVTC
  34. 34. Right-to-Know Timeline1976 - USA Worker Right-to-Know (RTK) Law Enacted – Guarantees worker access to workplace chemical information1983 - Santa Clara County adopts Hazardous Materials Model Ordinance & Local RTK Law – Companies must report hazardous material storage & plans to protect public health 1 of 4
  35. 35. Right-to-Know Timeline1984 - CA adopts Leaking Underground storage Tank Law – Monitor industrial chemical leaks & clean-up1986 - USA Community RTK Act (CERCLA) Established Toxics Release Inventory – Industries must report annual chemical releases & pollution prevention targets 2 of 4
  36. 36. TRI Releases for 2007 for Selected Electronics Companies Total On-site Disposal or Total Off-site Disposal Total On- and Off-site DisposalFacility City State Other Releases or Other Releases or Other ReleasesIBM CORP HOPEWELL JUNCTION NY 1074661 22249.4 1096911SILTRONIC CORP. PORTLAND OR 635958 3.3 635961SANYO SOLAR (USA)LLC CARSON CA 8069 234714 242783IBM CORP ESSEX JUNCTION VT 185718 2645.1034 188363SONY ELECTRONICSINC. DOTHAN AL 74820 16891.52 91711MICRON TECHNOLOGYINC BOISE ID 88375 864.3 89239PHILIPS LUMILEDSLIGHTING CO SAN JOSE CA 73231 0 73231TEXAS INSTRUMENTSINC DALLAS TX 23652 44124.89 67776DU PONT ELECTRONICSMICROCIRCU ITSINDUSTRIES LTD. MANATI PR 1428 34679.232 36107INTEL CORP RIO RANCHO NM 18193 3589.9 21783
  37. 37. The footprint of high-tech development
  38. 38. Moore’s Law
  39. 39. Activists Chide Dell Computer Recycling
  40. 40. Apple Campaign
  41. 41. Inside an iPhone
  42. 42. Inside your iPhone
  43. 43. Our movement expands as Industry moves out of S.V.Global High-Tech Production is Undergoing the Largest Industrial Expansion in the History of the World
  44. 44. We are undergoing the “Largest industrial transition in history”• 127 new fabs – Total exceeds $115 billion – $1- 3 billion each – 300 mm fabs may double the cost• 200 mm to 300 mm fabs: $14 billion – “Largest industrial transition in history” Source: SEMI
  45. 45. High Tech manufacturing is global Electronics factory in China
  46. 46. The scale is staggeringOver 500,00 workers at Foxconn in China
  47. 47. Electronics Supply Chain Research done by Sarah Boyd
  48. 48. Taiwan: Workers Link Cancer to RCA Plant by Matthew Yi, San Francisco Chronicle May 24th, 2002While many laud the globalization of technology as a positive force that spreads the wealth and helps industry grow, a group of Taiwanese workers came to Silicon Valley Thursday to tell a different story.Their tale has to do with a former RCA facility in Taiwans northern county of Taoyuan. More than 1,000 former employees of that facility are suffering from cancer and more than 200 have died, according to the visiting workers, who used to make TVs and semiconductors.Most of those afflicted believe the companys plants polluted groundwater with toxic chemicals, leading to the outbreak of illness, according to the Taiwan Association for Victims of Occupational Injuries and the Self-Help Association of Former RCA Employees. Both are based in Taipei and were represented at a news conference held in San Jose Thursday, seeking publicity for the workers claims. http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=2649
  49. 49. RCA Workers in Taiwan
  50. 50. E-Waste Dumped in Guiyu, China
  51. 51. Women sorting wires to burn in China
  52. 52. Burning E-Waste in Guiyu, China
  53. 53. Woman breaking a CRT monitor in China
  54. 54. A Chinese child sits amongst a pile of wires and e-waste. Children can often be found dismantling e-waste containing many hazardous chemicals known to be potentially very damaging to childrenshealth.
  55. 55. E-Waste problems continue• Wired for gold - (China Daily)• Updated: 2011-11-16 07:59• By Cheng Anqi and Erik Nilsson• http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/usa/life/2011-11/16/content_14104157.htm
  56. 56. The Digital DumpA new report on e-waste dumping in Africa by the Basel Action Network October 24, 2005
  57. 57. Global e-waste dumping
  58. 58. E-Waste and Clean ProductionConference in Bejing – April 2004
  59. 59. Eco-Waste activists in Manila
  60. 60. Waste Not Asiain Kerala, 2007
  61. 61. Farmers and fishermen protest high-tech pollution in Taiwan
  62. 62. Recent studies from Taiwan• Increased standardized incidence ratio of breast cancer in female electronics workers• Tzu-I Sung1, Pau-Chung Chen1,2, Lukas Jyuhn-Hsiarn Lee3, Yi-Ping Lin2,4,• Gong-Yih Hsieh1 and Jung-Der Wang*1,2,5
  63. 63. Recent studies from TaiwanSung TI, Wang JD, Chen PC. Increased risks of infantmortality and of deaths due to congenital malformationin the offspring of male electronics workers. BirthDefects Res A Clin Mol Teratol 2008.Chang YM, Tai CF, Yang SC, et al. Cancer incidenceamong workers potentially exposed to chlorinatedsolvents in an electronics factory. J Occup Health2005;47:171-80.
  64. 64. Summary of Occupational Illness in Korean electronics (compiled by Dr. Kong of SHARPS) Samsung Electronics Total Semiconductor LCD Mobile etc. Subtotal phoneNo.of Victims Total 79 16 3 9 107 149 Cancer 63 10 2 6 81 114 Total 27 7 2 5 41 59No.of Deaths Cancer 23 6 1 5 35 53
  65. 65. Environmental Challenges andTransparency in China For more info www.ipe.org.cn Ma Jun 02/11/2011
  66. 66. 与31家信息通信产业的互动Interaction with 31 ICT Brands
  67. 67. KEY FINDINGS 5: BRANDS TURNED PROACTIVE Checks on Use of Public I Push for Suppliers to Further Extension of Supplier Information to Enhance Make Environmental Violation Supply Chain Corrective Action Management into the Checked Replied to Cases Management & Disclose Information Supply Chain theCompany Name NGO Directly Purpose of Considered Decided to Corrective Regular Pushing Tier Letter the Study Performed Performed Establishing Establish Action Disclosure of Extended 1 Suppliers to Initial In-depth to Main a Search a Search & Discharge Manage Tier Checks Checks Materials Mechanism Mechanism Explanation Data 2 Suppliers Siemens √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X Vodafone √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X √ Philips √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X √ X Nokia √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X Alcatel-Lucent √ √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X BT √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X √ HP √ √ √ √ √ X √ X X X Samsung √ √ √ √ √ X √ X X X Sanyo √ √ √ √ √ X √ X X X Sony √ √ √ √ √ √ X X X X Toshiba √ √ √ √ √ X X X X X Panasonic √ √ √ v √ X X X X X Sharp √ √ √ X √ X X X X X Lenovo √ √ √ X √ X X X X X Intel √ √ √ X √ X X X X X Seiko Epson √ X √ √ √ X X X X X Motorola √ √ √ √ √ X X X X X Hitachi √ √ √ √ X X X X X X Canon √ X √ √ X X X X X X Cisco √ X √ √ X X X X X X Dell √ √ √ √ X X X X X X Apple √ √ √ √ √ X X X X X Haier √ √ √ X X X X X X X TCL √ √ √ X X X X X X X Foxconn √ √ √ X X X X X X X SingTel √ √ √ X X X X X X X BYD √ √ √ X √ X X X X X IBM √ X √ X X X X X X X LG √ X √ X X X X X X X Ericsson √ X √ X X X X X X XBlackBerry- Rim √ X √ X X X X X X X
  68. 68. International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT)Global Symposium on Strategies for a Sustainable High-Tech Industry November 14-17, 2002 San Jose, CA http://www.svtc.org/icrt/index.html
  69. 69. Activists gather at First Symposium on Global Strategies for aSustainable High-Tech Industry - 2002
  70. 70. International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT) Mission Statement, adopted November 16, 2002• We are an international solidarity network that promotes corporate and government accountability in the global electronics industry. We are united by our concern for the lifecycle impacts of this industry on health, the environment and workers rights.
  71. 71. Soesterberg PrinciplesElectronic Sustainability Commitment Each new generation of technical improvements in electronic products should include parallel and proportional improvements in environmental, health and safety as well as social justice attributes. Adopted by the Trans-Atlantic Network for Clean Production, May 16, 1999
  72. 72. Forward to Challenging the Chip• “We need a lot more “people’s histories” like those in this book. The stories of brave and creative women and men who fight back when their lives and their children’s lives are threatened. These are the stories of people challenging the corporate elite and speaking truth to power – whether the power be the corporations or the governments that allow these practices to continue. Such stories teach us that when people come together across traditional boundaries – geographic, political, racial, etcetera – they can actually change the world.” – Jim Hightower, former state elected official in Texas
  73. 73. ICRT delegation visitsNational Semiconductor
  74. 74. Book tour at Beijing University
  75. 75. Consumer Education: The Story of Stuff & The Story of Electronics• What is the Story of Stuff? From its extraction through sale, use and disposal, all the stuff in our lives affects communities at home and abroad, yet most of this is hidden from view. The Story of Stuff is a 20-minute, fast-paced, fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calls us together to create a more sustainable and just world. Itll teach you something, itll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever.http://www.storyofstuff.com/The Story of Electronics This video explores the high-tech revolutions collateral damage—25 million tons of e- waste and counting, poisoned workers and a public left holding the bill. Host Annie Leonard takes viewers from the mines and factories where our gadgets begin to the horrific backyard recycling shops in China where many end up. The film concludes with a call for a green race to the top where designers compete to make long-lasting, toxic-free products that are fully and easily recyclable.http://www.storyofstuff.org/movies-all/story-of-electronics/
  76. 76. UN expert meeting charts the way forward on hazardous chemicals in electronic products Historic meeting addresses entire lifecycle of electronicsFor the first time, more than 100 experts from around the world gathered in Vienna, Austria to make recommendations for a UN process on reducing and eliminating hazardous chemicals in the design, manufacturing, and end of life stages of electronic products. Concerns over toxic exposures during manufacturing, use, and recycling of electronic products provoked governments, the private sector, and public interest NGOs from around the world to call for the meeting at a global conference in 2009.
  77. 77. Delegates to Vienna SAICM Meeting – March 2011
  78. 78. Key Recommendations from SAICM in ViennaDelegates developed key recommendations:• eliminating chemical hazards during design;• phasing-out hazardous substances;• improving information transparency and flow;• ensuring equal protection of workers, communities, and consumers;• preventing export of hazardous electronic wastes from developed to developing countries;• and controlling export and import of near-end- of-life equipment.
  79. 79. Strategic ImportanceRecognizing that many challenges need to be resolved through improved design of new products, recommendations were made on eliminating chemicals of concern, full ingredient disclosure, identifying and implementing substitution strategies, green procurement and extended producer responsibility.
  80. 80. Priority – Reduce Exposure to Hazardous SubstancesThe producers and manufacturers should prioritize reduction of exposure to chemicals, primarily by elimination or substitution of the most hazardous substances and production processes, especially those processes involving worker and community exposure to substances of concern. In the present context, substances of concern include those that are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic and/or those that are carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive or developmental toxins, neurotoxins, neurodevelopmental toxins, respiratory toxins, immuno toxins, organ system toxins, and/or endocrine disrupting compounds. ;
  81. 81. Early Warning Systems• Producers and manufacturers should cooperate with government, non-governmental organizations, trade unions, health care providers, and others to provide ongoing training to workers, community representatives and first responders to provide early warning systems about the inherent hazards of the materials being used, detailed information about best practices for protection from and reduction of exposure to those hazards, how to recognize early signs of adverse health impacts, and prevention of exposure to all hazards
  82. 82. Health Surveillance• Producers and manufacturers, with oversight by the government and the full participation of worker and community representatives should ensure (and report the results to appropriate governmental authorities of): – comprehensive, occupationally relevant health surveillance for all of its workers; – comprehensive ongoing industrial hygiene and environmental monitoring to measure the release and exposure to all hazardous materials used in manufacturing and production; – access to these data (and adequate funding) to ensure comprehensive and independent epidemiological assessments of worker health; – Action plans to preserve and protect worker health based on these data. – In situations where pollution from electronics production facilities has been found in surrounding communities, the manufacturers and producers should cooperate with health researchers and investigators to assess and control adverse health impacts, especially with respect to vulnerable populations.
  83. 83. Need for Fair CompensationGovernments are encouraged to develop and implement effective liability and compensation legislation for the victims of toxic exposures in the workplace and the community. Given that the electronics industry is characterized by multiple chemical exposures to vulnerable workers to chemicals of concern, many of which are in addition inadequately tested and regulated, and the frequent changes in process chemicals, it is particularly important to develop compensation systems funded by the employers that are designed to address these inherent challenges to fair compensation by developing mechanisms that assure that workers harmed by such exposure qualify for adequate and timely compensation, as well as treatment and rehabilitation.
  84. 84. What about EICC?Key critique by Good Electronics: – EICC code is not sufficiently aligned with international labour standards/ILO conventions (This point was supported by Verité) – Very problematic that right to collective bargaining is not included. (This point was supported by Verité) – Code lacks specific details and enforcement – Language of the EICC code is – in places – vague and ambiguous – As a result, code lacks credibility and effectiveness
  85. 85. Key Points from the ANROEV Electronics Workshop Jaipur India Nov 17,2001• Broadening our electronics network• Improving communications (internal and external)• Mapping (supply chain and health)• Continued research to link toxic exposure to health in electronics• Planning for ICRT’s 10th anniversary in 2012
  86. 86. Ted Smith Biography• founder and former Executive Director of Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition.• co-founder and Chair of the steering committee of the Electronics TakeBack Coalition, (which is working to promote life-cycle producer responsibility within the high-tech electronics industry.)• co-founder and Coordinator of the International Campaign for Responsible Technology (ICRT), (an international network committed to working for the development of sustainable, non-polluting technologies.)• widely published author and respected speaker, and is co-editor of “Challenging the Chip: Labor Rights and Environmental Justice in the Global Electronics Industry” published by Temple University Press, 2006• a graduate of Wesleyan University and Stanford Law School and was a VISTA Volunteer in Washington, DC from 1967 - 1969.
  87. 87. For Further Information: Ted Smith – International Campaign for Responsible Technology & Electronics TakeBack Coalitiontsmith@igc.org; +408-242-6707www.icrt.co; www.electronicstakeback.com/home/http://www.archive.org/details/pioneeractivistsil00smitrichhttp://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=kt2b69r7hf;style=oac4;view=dsc

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