The Project One-Pager:  A Simple Tool for Collaboratively Defining Project Scope
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Project One-Pager: A Simple Tool for Collaboratively Defining Project Scope

on

  • 17,619 views

Getting a project team to both understand and support the scope of a proposed project is arguable the most important task a project manager should focus on at the start of a new project initiative. ...

Getting a project team to both understand and support the scope of a proposed project is arguable the most important task a project manager should focus on at the start of a new project initiative. Decisions about project scope can impact the composition of the project team, and serves as the basis for subsequent cost and schedule estimation. There are many benefits to engaging the project team in the planning and scope definition process. In this presentation I will describe a simple tool (e.g., “The Project One-pager”) that I use for documenting the scope of a project. The tool consists of six basic elements. I will describe how I integrate this tool in an iterative and collaborative project planning process, to ensure that the project starts off on the right foot.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
17,619
Views on SlideShare
17,489
Embed Views
130

Actions

Likes
16
Downloads
207
Comments
2

7 Embeds 130

https://twitter.com 81
http://www.contextualmenu.com 24
http://tweetedtimes.com 11
http://a0.twimg.com 8
http://us-w1.rockmelt.com 4
http://pinterest.com 1
https://www.linkedin.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Like the simple format of the one-pager and it adapt it for the work I'm doing in IT project management.

    Thanks,
    Perry
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Great doc, I like how it cleanly calls out the key points needed in a project one pager. Thanks!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • As the name implies, the one-pager is ideally a single page document that captures the essence of the project. The one-page length constraint helps the team keep focus on what is important, and increases the likelihood that the document will actually be read.
  • A concise and consistently used project name helps communication about the project, both among members of the project team, and also among interested parties outside the project team. Having a unique name is especially important for disambiguating projects that are deployed in several phases.
  • The objective statement is typically written by the primary stakeholder for the project. . The statement distills the motivation of the project and often takes several iterations to get right. Shoot for no more than 3 lines of text.
  • Well written requirements are unambiguous, realist, and measurable. Think of requirements as a checklist of victory conditions. Of the six One-Pager elements, the Requirements list is most likely to be revised and negotiated at the start of the project. Aim for no more than 7 requirements.
  • Out of scope items often include “wishlist” items that are not feasible given the current constraints of the project, but may be done after this project is complete. This element is particularly useful for communicating expectations with external stakeholders.
  • The team roster should include core team members with specific functional authority over the project, not necessarily every single person who will work on the project. Project roles clarify who is responsible for what on the project. Examples of team roles include: Project Manager, Tech Lead, Content Lead, Developer.
  • At a minimum, include a “target launch date” or some other project completion milestone. Aim for no more than 5 scheduled milestones.
  • This process is collaborative in the sense that members of the core team have an opportunity to comment on and edit the project proposal before the project begins in earnest.
  • If maintaining project scope is problem in your organization, consider implementing a formal sign-off phase with external stakeholders. Ideally members of the project team are communicating with their constituents as needed throughout the planning process.
  • Here is an example of a real-life one-pager used for small mobile website redesign project.
  • This screen shows the changes made to the Requirements and Out of Scope sections of the example one-pager after 3 revisions. Green indicates new text and strikes indicate removed text.

The Project One-Pager:  A Simple Tool for Collaboratively Defining Project Scope The Project One-Pager: A Simple Tool for Collaboratively Defining Project Scope Presentation Transcript

  • The Project One-Pager A Simple Tool for Collaboratively Defining Project Scope Tito Sierra Digital Library Federation Forum 2011 Project Manager’s Group Meeting November 2, 2011
  • Outline
    • 8 Reasons Why Projects Fail
    • The Project One-Pager
      • 6 Basic Elements
      • Process Notes
      • Example
    • Benefits and Limitations
    • Closing Thoughts
  • Why Projects Fail
    • Projects can fail for many reasons.
    • Many of the fundamental problems can avoided at the start of the project with a little bit of planning and conversation.
  • Why Projects Fail
    • The goals of the project are unclear
  • Why Projects Fail
    • The goals of the project are unclear
    • There is disagreement about the goals of the project
  • Why Projects Fail
    • The goals of the project are unclear
    • There is disagreement about the goals of the project
    • The requirements of the project are ambiguous or unrealistic
  • Why Projects Fail
    • The goals of the project are unclear
    • There is disagreement about the goals of the project
    • The requirements of the project are ambiguous or unrealistic
    • The project is inadequately staffed
  • Why Projects Fail
    • Lack of consensus on project roles (i.e., who does what)
  • Why Projects Fail
    • Lack of consensus on project roles (i.e., who does what)
    • The proposed schedule for the project is completely unrealistic
  • Why Projects Fail
    • Lack of consensus on project roles (i.e., who does what)
    • The proposed schedule for the project is completely unrealistic
    • The scope of the project is poorly managed or unconstrained
  • Why Projects Fail
    • Lack of consensus on project roles (i.e., who does what)
    • The proposed schedule for the project is completely unrealistic
    • The scope of the project is poorly managed or unconstrained
    • The project doesn’t make sense upon closer inspection
  • Avoiding Bad Starts
    • Poor planning and communication at the start of the project will negatively impact the entire project lifecycle.
  • Avoiding Bad Starts
    • Good planning and communication will improve resource allocation, schedule estimation, and managing scope.
    • It will also improve team morale.
  • The Project One-Pager
  • The Project One-Pager
    • A planning and communication tool that enables a shared understanding of the project before it begins.
  • The Project One-Pager
  • Six Elements
    • Project Name
    • Objective Statement
    • Requirements
    • Out of Scope
    • Team
    • Schedule
  • 1. Project Name A unique name used for all communication about the project going forward.
  • 2. Objective Statement A concise hi-level summary of what the project intends to achieve.
  • 3. Requirements An enumerated list of outcomes the project must achieve to be considered complete.
  • 4. Out of Scope An list of outcomes that the project will explicitly not address.
  • 5. Team The proposed core team roster, with projects roles attached to each name.
  • 6. Schedule A list of hi-level milestones for the project, with proposed dates attached.
  • Collaborative Planning
  • Process Notes
    • Project Manager writes first draft
    • Kickoff meeting to review one-pager
    • Solicit feedback from core team
    • PM revises document for next review
    • Rinse and repeat until consensus
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • One-Pager Benefits
    • Simple and accessible to all
    • Creates useful documentation for describing the project externally
    • Can reveal fundamental problems at the start of a project when costs are low
  • One-Pager Limitations
    • Not for managing the project lifecycle
    • You can’t anticipate all scope issues in advance; things come up
    • Not everyone reads bullet points; visuals can augment understanding
  • Closing Thoughts
    • Good communication is the key to get a project off to the right start
  • Closing Thoughts
    • Good communication is the key to get a project off to the right start
    • Collaborative planning at the start can help minimize gotchas later
  • Closing Thoughts
    • Good communication is the key to get a project off to the right start
    • Collaborative planning at the start can help minimize gotchas later
    • Simple tools work best
  • Thanks!
    • Tito Sierra
    • Associate Director for Technology
    • MIT Libraries
    • [email_address]
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
  • Image Credits
    • UX Stencil © Todd Zazelenchuk & Elizabeth Boling. Available from http://www.userfocus.co.uk/uxstencil/