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Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
Fortune130404
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Fortune130404

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  • 1. A  Radical  Approach  to  Forest  Sector  Tune-­‐up  Jari  Kuusisto  SC-­‐Research  University  of  Vaasa  1  
  • 2. Evolving  innovaAon  acAviAes  •  InnovaAon  acAviAes  evolve  constantly,  especially  over  the  last  few  years  Ame  •  This  change  creates  both  challenges  and  opportuniAes  for  firms  and  other  actors  •  As  a  result,  there  exists  a  variety  of  ways  to  develop  new  products  –  goods  and  services  2  
  • 3. Stable  development  mode  •  Many  organisaAons  conAnue  to  follow  this  –  They  rely  on  internal  capabiliAes  in  innovaAon  acAviAes  •  This  is  a  mode  suitable  for  stable  environment  •  Typically  –  Focus  is  on  improvements  to  exisAng  product  lines  and  processes  •  Well  developed  R&D&I  processes  –  Stage-­‐gate-­‐model,  V-­‐model  etc.  3  
  • 4. Iden%fy  opportuni%es  Gather  knowledge  Basic  needs  /  and  behavioral  pa<erns  understanding  Concept  /  idea  Concept  development  Prototyping  Tes%ng  Market  launch  From  idea  to  product  •  What  is  our  offer?   •  How  to  develop  goods  /  services?  4  
  • 5. Stage-­‐gate-­‐model  •  InnvoaAon  acAviAes  follow  a  process  with  clear  stages  Ideas  Needs  Reguirements  ProducAon  5  
  • 6. Stable  development  mode  •  Challenges  – Leans  too  much  on  firms  own  internal  resources  –  limits  the  use  of  useful  external  knowledge  – More  radical  ideas  never  get  far  in  the  formal  R&D&I  process  – Limited  room  for  prototyping  /  piloAng  – Time-­‐to-­‐markets  tends  to  be  too  long  – Rigid  process  places  innovaAon  acAviAes  in  too  narrow  space  –  in  the  box  •  Improvements  for  exisAng  products  6  
  • 7. Open-­‐  and  user  innovaAon  •  Makes  use  of  resources  external  to  the  firm  •  Ideas,  knowledge  and  innovaAons  are  traded  in  and  out  of  the  firm  – IPR:n  becomes  tradable  •  Complements  and  partly  replaces  tradiAonal  innovaAon  acAviAes  – Can  be  much  more  effecAve  •  Degrees  of  opennes  exist  – Great  variety  of  operaAonal  modes  7  
  • 8. User  related  themes  •  Users  consist  of  a  heterogeneous  group  of  actors  –  User  communiAes  –  Lead  users  –  User  innovators  –  ‘Ordinary’  users  etc.  •  InnovaAon  processes  take  many  forms  and  shapes  –  E.g.  tradiAonal  R&D  and  open  innovaAon  •  RecogniAon  and  understanding  of  user  needs  –  Needs,  latent  needs,  future  needs  –  New  ways  to  idenAfy  and  explore  user  needs  •  Design  –  Design  is  an  important  innovaAon  plaborm  –  Strategic  design,  user  centric  design…  •  Enabling  technologies  –  Etc.  8  
  • 9. SC-­‐Research    •  Explores  and  maps  innovaAons  and  value  creaAon  from  user  perspecAve,  across  the  forest  sector.    •  SystemaAc  scoping  of  the  research  topic  will  lead  into  more  structured  understanding  and  improved  problem  definiAon.      •  Such  steps  are  important  in  creaAng  new  insights  into  the  forest  sector  innovaAon  potenAal.    9  
  • 10. SC-­‐Research    •  User  perspecAves  as  a  systemaAc  way  to  idenAfy  and  analyse  innovaAon  and  value  creaAon  opportuniAes  across  the  forest  sector.    – different  types  of  users  and  their  exisAng  /  potenAal  roles  within  the  forest  sector  value  networks.    •  Users  perspecAve  is  a  novel  approach  and  it  is  expected  to  highlight  a  range  of  new  type  of  value  creaAon  opportuniAes.  10  
  • 11. SC-­‐Research    •  Broad  innovaAon  perspecAve    – covering  products,  services,  processes,  organizaAon,  markeAng,  actors’  roles  and  relaAons,  norms,  and  values  as  potenAal  sources  for  innovaAons.    •  Economic  gains  represent  only  one  aspect  of  value  creaAon    – In  the  user  context  four  funcAonal  systems  economy,  culture,  regulaAon  and  policy  are  recognised  as  potenAal  drivers/barriers  of  innovaAon  and  value  creaAon.    11  
  • 12. The  very  un-­‐scienAfic  story  line  16.11.2012  Jari  Kuusisto  12  
  • 13. 13  http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/maslow.htmlMaslow  hierachy  of  needs  
  • 14. 14  Hunting, collecting wildberriesForestry, paper, firewood,building, tarCountry houses, recreationDevelopment towardsintangible value creation is astrong trend and it concernseven activities that used to beon the bottom of the needshierarchy
  • 15. 15  Hunting, collecting, wildberries pickingForestry, paper, fire wood,building, tarSummer houses, recreationForest industry gotstuck in the bottomof the needshierarchy?
  • 16. 16  Move towards intangible valuecreation is hardly happening:-  Paper industry moves out ofFinland-  Paper machinery productionis moving overseas as well-  How to renew the industry?-  New raw materials-  Applications, goods,services…-  Medicin, cosmetics?
  • 17. 17  
  • 18. 18  Adapted 7 levelHierarchy ofNeeds diagrambased onMaslows theoryBiological and Physiological needsbasic life needs - air, food, drink, shelter, warmth, sex, sleep, etc.Safety needsprotection, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc.Aesthetic needsbeauty, balance, form, etc.Cognitive needsknowledge, meaning, self-awarenessEsteem needsachievement, status, responsibility, reputationBelongingness and Love needsfamily, affection, relationships, work group, etc.Self-actualizationpersonal growthand fulfilment© design alan chapman 2001-7 - adapted by persons unknown based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of NeedsNot to be sold or published. More free online training resources are at www.businessballs.com. Sole risk with user. Author accepts no liability.
  • 19. 19  Adapted 8 levelHierarchy of Needsdiagram, based onMaslows theoryBiological and Physiological needsbasic life needs - air, food, drink, shelter, warmth, sex, sleep, etc.Safety needsprotection, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc.Aesthetic needsbeauty, balance, form, etc.Cognitive needsknowledge, meaning, self-awarenessEsteem needsachievement, status, responsibility, reputationBelongingness and Love needsfamily, affection, relationships, work group, etc.Self-actualizationpersonal growth, self-fulfilment© design alan chapman 2001-7 - adapted by persons unknown based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of NeedsNot to be sold or published. More free online training resources are at www.businessballs.com. Sole risk with user. Author accepts no liability.Transcendencehelping others to self-actualizeHigher order needs keepexpanding, more classesets..Unexploited businesspotential andopportunities
  • 20. Broad  perspecAve  to  innovaAon  Down  side  InnovaAon  ≈  everything  goes!  20  
  • 21. Broad  innovaAon  perspecAve  •  Framework  for  understanding  complex  and  systemic  innovaAons  –     Eight types of innovation ...o  Productso  Processeso  Marketingo  Organisationo  Roleso  Relationso  Normso  Values... across four functional systems:o  Economyo  Cultureo  Politicso  LawSource; adapted from Parsons, 1976; Hochgerner, 2011
  • 22. Broad  innovaAon  perspecAve  •  Success  depends  on  – All  8  types  of  innovaAons  that  are  relevant  –  Across  four  funcAonal  systems  •  Complex  innovaAons  need  to  work  on  all  of  these  areas  to  be  successful  •  Highly  relevant  perspecAve  to  – Service  innovaAons,  and  – Public  sector  innovaAons  Eight types of innovation ...o  Productso  Processeso  Marketingo  Organisationo  Roleso  Relationso  Normso  Values... across four functional systems:o  Economyo  Cultureo  Politicso  LawSource; adapted from Parsons, 1976; Hochgerner, 2011
  • 23. Forest  worlds  BiomassOpen dataExperiences
  • 24. Forest  worlds  growth  potenAal  Open dataExperiencesBiomass
  • 25. Examples  •  Tailored  sale  of  an  individual  log  –  Pick  up  a  specific  tree,  fall  it,  transportaAon  with  the  user,  e.g.  musical  instrument  manufacturer  can  pick  and  choose  most  suitable  trees,  the  same  applies  to  professional  carpenters  –  Price  differenAaAon;  fiber  Amber,  logs,  special  wood…  •  Everymans  right  •  Changing  world  and  value  creaAon  –  What  rights  all  ciAzens  have  to  exploit  privately  owned  forests?  •  Finnish  ciAzens  •  Foreign  ciAzens      
  • 26. Examples  •  Forest  nature  as  a  place  providing  recreaAonal  experiences  •  E.g.  ’Park  of  silence’,  silent  environment  experience  •  Nature  tourism,  bear  watching  etc.  •  Health  tourism  •  Open  data  -­‐    virtual  forests  ja  (Metla,  Metsäkeskus,  Maanmipl.)  •  Finland  holds  extensive  forest  data  –  data  innovaAon  (?)  –  Virtual  terrain  /  see  Google  Street  View  •  Game  scenerys  in  ‘real’  woods  –  Virtual  space  for  eco  tourists  –  ExisAng  laser  scanning  providing  3D  image  of  forest,  measuring  of  logs..  –  Tracking  of  logs  –  sustainability  serAficates  –  Distant  follow-­‐up  of  forest  development  –  new  type  of  serAficate  
  • 27. Examples  •  Intangible  value  creaAon  –  the  user  perspecAve  •  Biomass  in  the  future?  •  New  ways  to  use  paper  and  board:  packaging,  furniture,  design  objects..  •  Paper  as  a  media,  what  is  the  future  scenario?  •  Raw  material  for  medical  industry  and  food  industry?  •  Renewable  energy  •  Sustainable  building  materials  
  • 28. User  perspecAve  to  value  chain  /  network  UPM  Fiber  processing  Labels  Packaging  Raw  material    suppliers  Packaging    Firms  E.g.  TetraPak  Atria  Food  processing    industry  Retail    industry   Consumer  •  Consumers and end users as a target / starting point?•  Leapfrogging value chain can take UPM type of firms closerto the end user – co-creation with food processing industry•  Food processing industry has in-depth knowledge onconsumers

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