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Laser projection

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  • 1. Laser Illumination Systems for  2D and 3D Digital Cinema Bill Beck Co‐founder  |  EVP Business Development Laser Light Engines, Inc. Salem, New Hampshire
  • 2. What is a laser? A device or system that converts electricity to visible  light with three desirable attributes: 1. Ultra‐high spatial BRIGHTNESS 2. Very LONG LIFETIME at full power 3. High EFFICIENCY electrical‐to‐RGB lumen conversion
  • 3. Why use lasers for D‐Cinema? • • • • • Studios want BRIGHT 3D Exhibitors want to SAVE MONEY Creatives want BETTER IMAGE QUALITY OEMs want the NEXT BIG PRODUCT Architects want to go BOOTHLESS
  • 4. How does a laser light source differ  from a Xenon lamp? Attribute UoM High pressure ‐ gas discharge  short arc creates bright “spot” Collimated to  moderately divergent Isotropic = all directions must be focused to small spot mm2 ‐ SR Very small   ‐ 0.001‐1 High relative to laser  4‐20 nm “Narrow” ‐ 0.01‐2 “Wide” ‐ 40‐80/primary Hours to  end of life 5,000‐100,000 to 80% output 25,000 ‐50,000  target 200‐2000 to 50% output 500‐1000 typical lm/wp‐watt 5‐10 2‐6  Output pattern Spectral bandwidth Lifetime Efficiency  Xenon Stimulated emission very high spatial brightness E to O Conversion Étendue  Laser
  • 5. RGB Laser Hierarchy • Device – individual (single) emitter     • Array or bar – multiple emitters per device   • Module – Aggregation – multiple devices or arrays  – Beamline – single, high power beam   • Engine – combination of R+G+B modules   • System – one or more engines per projector  200mW – 3W 3 ‐ 10 W 10 – 50 W 10 ‐ 40 W 20 ‐ 50 W 50 ‐ 100 W 50 – 600+ W
  • 6. Candidate Projection Lasers Laser Type Color  Center  Spectral  Power/d étendue λ BW evice Device  efficiency Life RGB nm nm W optical mm2 ‐ sr E to O % khrs Diode (1 emitter) R B 635‐645 445‐465 0.2‐2 0.5‐2 1‐2 1‐3 small 10 ‐ 25 10 ‐ 30 5 ‐ 10 10 ‐ 25 Diode array (or bar) R 635‐654 2‐3 3‐5 small 15‐23 7‐10 Doubled Diode  or array G B 531‐535 460‐464 0.1‐0.2 3‐6 0.001 5‐6 20‐38 Diode‐Pumped Solid‐ State   (frequency  doubled or tunable) R G B 607‐642 515‐555 445‐460 0.2 ‐ 10 0.1 ‐ 10 0.1 ‐ 6 10‐20 20‐120 10 0.0001 ‐ 0.01 5‐8 8‐15 3‐5 20 – 50 20 – 50 20 ‐ 50 Unit of measure
  • 7. Lumens vs. laser watts 544 nm, 666 lm/W 532 nm, 603 lm/W 615 nm, 301 lm/W 462 nm, 45 lm/W 446 nm, 21 lm/W 640 nm, 120 lm/W * 7
  • 8. Critical Requirements • • • • • First, do no harm – despeckle the image Full brightness 3D  Better image quality Reduced Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) New Builds and Retrofit 
  • 9. First, do no harm ! • • • • • Speckle contrast equivalent to Xenon All Projectors All Screens All content All 3D systems
  • 10. What is speckle? You know it when you see it… • Interference pattern artifact that occurs when a coherent,  narrow band light source is used to illuminate projector chips • Figure of merit is “Speckle Contrast Ratio” SCR% = Std deviation of pixel intensity ÷ mean pixel intensity • Measureable; level of offensiveness is subjective Observer, content, position, screen type visual acuity, all play a role • GREEN is most difficult to acceptably despeckle ‐ human vision  has highest sensitivity, acuity at GREEN wavelengths • RED speckle can also be offensive in certain content 10
  • 11. How to despeckle? • Increase illumination angle and… • Scramble polarization  and… • Spectrally broaden the laser output  (a lot) THIS IS THE KEY TO A FULLY DESPECKLED LASER LIGHT SOURCE 11
  • 12. Full Brightness 3D • Constant >11 fL to meet DCI … or more?   • 2‐3 times current brightness … pre‐3D cut • Acceptable speckle reduction on silver or  white, high gain screens  • For all types of content • In future, 3D should be designed in
  • 13. Image Quality Improvement • Higher Contrast Ratio ‐ blacker blacks; whiter whites – Lower étendue system; higher f# launch – Laser sync • Greater bit depth • Better brightness uniformity • Wider Color Gamut (WCG) 
  • 14. Lower TCO Drivers • • • • Laser lifetimes of 25-50,000 hours Eliminate lamp cost Eliminate lamp change cost 30-50% lower direct power consumption • Reduced HVAC make up air out the vent stack
  • 15. New Build or Retrofit? Both! • Lasers will enable more efficient, higher performance  next generation projectors – – – – Direct to chip RGB – no splitting prism Lower étendue optical system  Smaller chips  Smaller, simpler projection lenses • Fiber delivery enables universal laser engine retrofit 
  • 16. Slides to be added here to explain technology demo and clips
  • 17. Remaining Challenges • Standards for Speckle level and measurement – Test conditions, procedures and acceptance levels • Rationalize regulatory environment (LIPA) • Commercialization • Manufacturing scale‐up and cost reduction
  • 18. Summary and Conclusions  The technology is in hand to meet or exceed all the current  requirements for Laser Digital Cinema  Laser has been adapted to all types of D‐Cinema projectors  Laser works for bright 3D, HFR and WCG We need to gather stakeholder inputs and move  this promising capability forward 18
  • 19. bbeck@laserlightengines.com +1 617.290.3861 THANK YOU!

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