Connected autonomy and talent development
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Connected autonomy and talent development

on

  • 1,397 views

Combining research on talent development, the development of expertise, and connectivist concepts such as complexity and learning networks, this presentation examines legacy assumptions about learning ...

Combining research on talent development, the development of expertise, and connectivist concepts such as complexity and learning networks, this presentation examines legacy assumptions about learning and suggests that new understandings might change our perceptions of what it means to be a "high ability learner."

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,397
Views on SlideShare
1,396
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://paper.li 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Networked, connective and personal learning theories are redefining what it means to be a “high ability” learner. Linking newly defined connective learning literacies with talent development models and action research, this session will explore how stories about learning—and learning support—are changing in an era of exponential information growth and potential complexity.\n
  • Move from consumers of education to creators of learning opportunities and environments\n “Cognitive surplus”\n Maker culture\n bricolage/tinkering\n (constructivism/constructionism)\n Connective learning\n Huge shift for anxious parents\nThe counterpart to technological determinisim. PLAY \n\nJohn Seely Brown- Reimagining Dewey http://ht.ly/1XF1Z Casual tinkering, deep tinkering\n\nwiliam Doll uses the terms science, story and spirit.\n\nCognitive suprplus- Shirky: spare brain power and the tools to share and connect it\n\n\nDecrease in Fluency after 1990: Fluency scores (quantity of the ideas: ability to produce a number of ideas) decreased by 4.68% from 1990 to 1998 and by 7.00% from 1990 to 2008.\nDecrease in Originality after 1990: Originality scores (quality of the ideas: ability to produce a number of statistically infrequent ideas that shows how unique and unusual the ideas are) decreased by 3.74% from 1990 to 1998 and remained static from 1998 to 2008. Originality scores have actually significantly decreased, but the decrease has been deflated through the use of outdated scoring lists.\nDecrease in Creative Strengths after 1990: Creative Strengths scores (creative personality traits, including being emotionally expressive, energetic, talkative or verbally expressive, humorous, imaginative, unconventional, lively or passionate, perceptive, connecting seemingly irrelevant things together, synthesizing, and seeing things from a different angle) decreased by 3.16% from 1990 to 1998 and by 5.75% from 1990 to 2008.\nDecrease in Elaboration after 1984: Elaboration scores (ability to develop and elaborate upon ideas and detailed and reflective thinking and motivation to be creative) decreased more than other subscales of the TTCT. Elaboration scores decreased by 19.41% from 1984 to 1990, by 24.62% from 1984 to 1998, and by 36.80% from 1984 to 2008.\nDecrease in Abstractness of Titles after 1998: Titles scores (ability to produce the thinking processes of synthesis and organization, to capture the essence of the information involved, and to know what is important) increased until 1998, but decreased by 7.41% from 1998 to 2008.\nDecrease in Resistance to Premature Closure after 1998: Closure scores (intellectual curiosity and open-mindedness) decreased from 1984 to 1990, increased from 1990 to 1998, and decreased by 1.84% from 1998 to 2008.\nhttp://www.britannica.com/blogs/2010/10/the-decline-of-creativity-in-the-united-states-5-questions-for-educational-psychologist-kyung-hee-kim\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Many presume delivery model of learning\n\nDual enrollment= PSEO\nSupplemental enrollment= online plus local\nTeachers are well-intentioned but struggling-- not a lot of models, teacher’s education is not keeping up. School choice\n Alternative Learning \n Dual enrollment\n Supplemental enrollment\n Community schooling\n Exchange programs \n Homeschooling\n Unschooling\n\nNeed a law, like special ed, that says every kids gets an individualized learning plan.\nIn the meantime, sit down with your child and dream one up.\n\nWhat to do: \n1. Use the new tools to participate or become aware of conversations of interest\n2. Visit other schooling models. consider having your child visit. \n\nGet/model skills in deciding, finding, creating and connecting: Model learning as a hobby.\nFollow one blog\nRSS feeds\nGoogle alerts\nLegitimate perip. participation\nIf gited is your concern, there are a number of opportunities to conenct ith other parents of figfted adn gifted adults and keep informed on a daily basis. this information is valuable as you deterine what other stesp you want to take. \nHelp your children find mentors\nBegabungs\n  \n1. mentoring 2. enrichment 3. acceleration http://www.renzullilearning.com/default.aspx #ntchat\nabout 15 hours ago via web\nEvaluate activities and assignments based on autonomy, diversity, openness and connectivity. AP classes are like training to swim the English channel by only ever having been in a pool. You can work really hard, but you’re not coping with the complexity. Plus, gifted kids can probably do AP work without a class- self study. \nSay no\nSay yes\nKeep a personal time log. Identify where cognitive surplus is being leached: TV Facebook\nDo something that makes you uneasy.\nChange your: hair, furniture, route to work, meal plan, etc.\nIf this is new for your kids, don’t expect an immediate positive response. Coasting, similarity, familiarity are EASY. Changes are HARD. (may not always be appropriate for overexcitabilities/twice exceptional)\nMake arrangements for your children to produce representations of their work-- portfolios that contain things done outside of or beyond formal academic demands. Communicate the value of these activities and attempts. Steal time-- yes, from school. On the other side: teachers need to accept alternative proposals. Consider non-graded activities. (Read Joe Bower) Create alternative recognition programs. (Kids themselves don’t recognize creativity in their midst. Adults with assumptions won’t either.)\nhttp://www.learninggeneralist.com/2010/11/understanding-tools-of-social-learning.html\n\nYou are the keeper of your child’s time. Evaluate how it is being spent. Including assignments. But understand it’s not the teacher’s job to completely replace everything. This is a cooperative zone. It is not their job to serve your child or you. It is to assist. Make an “accepting proposals” zone and time period. Remember that not all attempts will succeed. That’s OK-- you will be assessing on evidence of work, not “success.” If you are using social tools-- bookmarking, etc, this will be easier to see. “I went to the library” doesn’t cut it. Notes on what you looked at does. A bunch of websites doesn’t cut it. But highlighted and commented sections on the bookmarks shows they have been read.\n\nGifted ed is problematic because it does not recognize manyof the shifts taking place-- is trying to tinker, improve within the existing structures. Most gifted ed literature is still hidden behind paywalls, closed academic journals. Some cracks with Gifted ed chat., etc. Chat itself is unsophisticated, but finding the poeple and what they are doing in depth is significant. \n\nYou are not looking for a good transcript, you are looking for a good-- or several good- tribes.\n\n\n
  • http://www.dukegiftedletter.com/articles/vol5no1_ef.html\n
  • edevolving\nObstacles: Structural, Conceptual, Worldview, Psychological, Neuroscience\n  \nRT @chadratliff "If at first an idea is not absurd, there is no hope for it." -A. Einstein\n\nA historical, testosterone-fueled focus on conceptualizations of leadership and the idea of thought leaders.\n
  • tendency to admire problems, pound away at them, rather than move to a solution \n\nedevolving\nObstacles: Structural, Conceptual, Worldview, Psychological, Neuroscience\n  \nRT @chadratliff "If at first an idea is not absurd, there is no hope for it." -A. Einstein\n\nA historical, testosterone-fueled focus on conceptualizations of leadership and the idea of thought leaders.\n
  • in trying to create “reform” we are creating and telling stories we can’t afford. \n
  • in trying to create “reform” we are creating and telling stories we can’t afford. \n
  • in trying to create “reform” we are creating and telling stories we can’t afford. \n
  • in trying to create “reform” we are creating and telling stories we can’t afford. \n
  • The dream we have for our kids might be dated, not nearly as ambitious as they sound. College is one. \nOur stories that have been considered large dreams are now small in comparison, but unless you know about the other stories, unelss you’re listening to stories from other cultures, you won’t know this. \nGirls are especially vulnerable to pleasing behaviors, pressures (Ruf) (And probably oldest and only children as well) Going to school\n Learning “subjects” Robinson says: subjcts to devisive, suggest content coverage, and are arranged in a tacit hierarchy. “Disciplines” better-- suggest kind of thinking, not just content. And Kinds of thinking are shared across “disciplines.” Me: so transdisciplanry thingking, applied to problems rather than coverage, offer best option for learning. \n Learning with age-based peers\n Teachers know what you must know\n Learners must be measured (i.e. grades)\n Education is linear and finishes with a degree\n Gifted students get straight “A’s”\nOne statement Grainne made will stand out, and should be repeated to all undergraduate students. Acquiring knowledge and recalling it, she said, is no longer adequate - it's not really learning anymore.\nHam story\nIdea that if we do more of this, and get better at it, we we “solve” education problems\nTechnology will, eventually, kill the academic calendar. Downes 10/17/10\nParents of highly intelligent children focus on visible qualities such as right answers, cleanliness, and good manners, whereas parents of highly creative children focus on less-visible qualities, such as openness to experience, interests, imagination, and enthusiasm. Very organized and clean home environments can stifle children’s creativity. http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2010/10/the-decline-of-creativity-in-the-united-states-5-questions-for-educational-psychologist-kyung-hee-kim/\n
  • he College Board projects that in 15 years, the cost of a four year college education at a private university will approach $400,000 (at the current rate of cost increases).\nNow it is true that college-educated people normally earn more than non-college-educated folks. But over the past two decades the costs of university education--tuition, room, board and fees--have increased at a rate six times greater than the increase in the average earnings of college graduates. And in the past decade college graduates' earnings have actually fallen. http://www.forbes.com/2011/02/01/college-education-bubble-opinions-contributors-louis-lataif_print.html Universities On The Brink\nLouis E. Lataif, 02.01.11,\n
  • he College Board projects that in 15 years, the cost of a four year college education at a private university will approach $400,000 (at the current rate of cost increases).\nNow it is true that college-educated people normally earn more than non-college-educated folks. But over the past two decades the costs of university education--tuition, room, board and fees--have increased at a rate six times greater than the increase in the average earnings of college graduates. And in the past decade college graduates' earnings have actually fallen. http://www.forbes.com/2011/02/01/college-education-bubble-opinions-contributors-louis-lataif_print.html Universities On The Brink\nLouis E. Lataif, 02.01.11,\n
  • he College Board projects that in 15 years, the cost of a four year college education at a private university will approach $400,000 (at the current rate of cost increases).\nNow it is true that college-educated people normally earn more than non-college-educated folks. But over the past two decades the costs of university education--tuition, room, board and fees--have increased at a rate six times greater than the increase in the average earnings of college graduates. And in the past decade college graduates' earnings have actually fallen. http://www.forbes.com/2011/02/01/college-education-bubble-opinions-contributors-louis-lataif_print.html Universities On The Brink\nLouis E. Lataif, 02.01.11,\n
  • 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college. \n
  • Technology is not the solution. TEchnology is a element of process. Not computer programs, not online learning that is still content based, not a program that “fences in the Internet” and gives kids a menu of choices as “enrichment”-- all of these are based on the constraint of the classroom. Additoinal note: the conversation is becoming ever so much more pointed on this. There is an issue with men in leadership promoting technology as the answer. The tools, the programs, the packages. I’m generally reluctant to pull the gender card on anything, but this is not just my observation, and the men in educational leadership issue makes this a more pointed issue. Let’s use a machine, or a machine-made package, to make it better. \n We are also telling ourselves that we are telling new stories... but they’re not. Not relaly. \n Thes say more about teacher/institutional fears than about learning \n “Technology”\n “Online learning” \n “Social learning” \n “Curation”\n “Inquiry”\n Moving beyond speed and volume\n Today’s schools are the result of quirks of history.\n The “encyclopedia” problem\n The “pleasing” problem\n Behind the scenes:\n National “creativity crisis”\n 10%- 20% “non-graduates”\n 20% of K-12 learners in Minnesota are not in a “traditional” neighborhood school (2008-2009)\nCultural perception and emphasis on “intelligence” and academic achievement over creativity- now a crisis.\n The correlation to lifetime creative accomplishment was more than three times stronger for childhood creativity than childhood IQ.Newsweek\n6 areas of creavity- dropped in 20 years 4-36% (greatest drop in “elaboration” area\n\n Encyclopedias-- parents bought huge printed set. Defining knowledge, making it available. Now: Totally out of date, can’t get rid of them. On display at Sears for “atmosphere.” Large institutions are limited in ability to change their stories i.e. grasp and implement change. \n\nwillrich45\n  \nMore often than not, trying to make sense of the #edreform conversation makes my head hurt. All about knowing more, not learning more.\nless than a minute ago via TweetDeck\n\nCurriculum decisions made by 9-11 old white guys from Harvard in 1892, tweaked by fears unleashed by Sputnik in 1957, and worsened by 1983’s “A Nation at Risk” Where the post-war/pre-sputnik educational concerns were largely demographic—first the colleges trying to accommodate returning veterans, the likes of which had not been seen before, then quickly the schools doing the same for the young baby boomers. In contrast, the post-Sputnik concerns were curricular, focusing on what was being taught and how, rather than who was being taught. Another difference between the two eras was the assignment of blame. The military and the politicians received the blame for Pearl Harbor, not educators; in the Sputnik instance, the finger of blame quickly and sternly pointed at the schools. The third difference has to do with the public perception of the outcomes of the two reform movements: the first is almost unanimously regarded as a great success, a milestone in the history of American education not unlike that of the Morrill Act in the last century, while the second is widely regarded as having failed. http://www.nationalacademies.org/sputnik/ruther1.htm\n Typical story: educating good citizens, providing common ground and equal opportunity. \n Fear\n Control\n Competition\n\nMany teachers are fabulously successful, and excellent-- based on the succesof their students by the traditional understandings. Teachers being prepared fror traditional model of the classroom-- Richardson\n\nDefinition of success is “book smartness”, which is actually based on passive recall. \nSpeaking to you as someone who has worked outside of the traditional boxes\n\ngrad rate stats: http://www.all4ed.org/files/Minnesota_wc.pdf \n\nMany people believe that if you can get people a good education, they can get themselves out of poverty. Almost backwards. No matter how much you stuff people full of knowledge, particularly knowledge irrelevant to their personal situation, their daily circumstances will always loom larger than an imagined potential. If you are in constant physical pain, it makes it hard to do anything else. Same here with hunger and desperation which create physcial and psychological pain.\n
  • Technology is not the solution. TEchnology is a element of process. Not computer programs, not online learning that is still content based, not a program that “fences in the Internet” and gives kids a menu of choices as “enrichment”-- all of these are based on the constraint of the classroom. Additoinal note: the conversation is becoming ever so much more pointed on this. There is an issue with men in leadership promoting technology as the answer. The tools, the programs, the packages. I’m generally reluctant to pull the gender card on anything, but this is not just my observation, and the men in educational leadership issue makes this a more pointed issue. Let’s use a machine, or a machine-made package, to make it better. \n We are also telling ourselves that we are telling new stories... but they’re not. Not relaly. \n Thes say more about teacher/institutional fears than about learning \n “Technology”\n “Online learning” \n “Social learning” \n “Curation”\n “Inquiry”\n Moving beyond speed and volume\n Today’s schools are the result of quirks of history.\n The “encyclopedia” problem\n The “pleasing” problem\n Behind the scenes:\n National “creativity crisis”\n 10%- 20% “non-graduates”\n 20% of K-12 learners in Minnesota are not in a “traditional” neighborhood school (2008-2009)\nCultural perception and emphasis on “intelligence” and academic achievement over creativity- now a crisis.\n The correlation to lifetime creative accomplishment was more than three times stronger for childhood creativity than childhood IQ.Newsweek\n6 areas of creavity- dropped in 20 years 4-36% (greatest drop in “elaboration” area\n\n Encyclopedias-- parents bought huge printed set. Defining knowledge, making it available. Now: Totally out of date, can’t get rid of them. On display at Sears for “atmosphere.” Large institutions are limited in ability to change their stories i.e. grasp and implement change. \n\nwillrich45\n  \nMore often than not, trying to make sense of the #edreform conversation makes my head hurt. All about knowing more, not learning more.\nless than a minute ago via TweetDeck\n\nCurriculum decisions made by 9-11 old white guys from Harvard in 1892, tweaked by fears unleashed by Sputnik in 1957, and worsened by 1983’s “A Nation at Risk” Where the post-war/pre-sputnik educational concerns were largely demographic—first the colleges trying to accommodate returning veterans, the likes of which had not been seen before, then quickly the schools doing the same for the young baby boomers. In contrast, the post-Sputnik concerns were curricular, focusing on what was being taught and how, rather than who was being taught. Another difference between the two eras was the assignment of blame. The military and the politicians received the blame for Pearl Harbor, not educators; in the Sputnik instance, the finger of blame quickly and sternly pointed at the schools. The third difference has to do with the public perception of the outcomes of the two reform movements: the first is almost unanimously regarded as a great success, a milestone in the history of American education not unlike that of the Morrill Act in the last century, while the second is widely regarded as having failed. http://www.nationalacademies.org/sputnik/ruther1.htm\n Typical story: educating good citizens, providing common ground and equal opportunity. \n Fear\n Control\n Competition\n\nMany teachers are fabulously successful, and excellent-- based on the succesof their students by the traditional understandings. Teachers being prepared fror traditional model of the classroom-- Richardson\n\nDefinition of success is “book smartness”, which is actually based on passive recall. \nSpeaking to you as someone who has worked outside of the traditional boxes\n\ngrad rate stats: http://www.all4ed.org/files/Minnesota_wc.pdf \n\nMany people believe that if you can get people a good education, they can get themselves out of poverty. Almost backwards. No matter how much you stuff people full of knowledge, particularly knowledge irrelevant to their personal situation, their daily circumstances will always loom larger than an imagined potential. If you are in constant physical pain, it makes it hard to do anything else. Same here with hunger and desperation which create physcial and psychological pain.\n
  • Technology is not the solution. TEchnology is a element of process. Not computer programs, not online learning that is still content based, not a program that “fences in the Internet” and gives kids a menu of choices as “enrichment”-- all of these are based on the constraint of the classroom. Additoinal note: the conversation is becoming ever so much more pointed on this. There is an issue with men in leadership promoting technology as the answer. The tools, the programs, the packages. I’m generally reluctant to pull the gender card on anything, but this is not just my observation, and the men in educational leadership issue makes this a more pointed issue. Let’s use a machine, or a machine-made package, to make it better. \n We are also telling ourselves that we are telling new stories... but they’re not. Not relaly. \n Thes say more about teacher/institutional fears than about learning \n “Technology”\n “Online learning” \n “Social learning” \n “Curation”\n “Inquiry”\n Moving beyond speed and volume\n Today’s schools are the result of quirks of history.\n The “encyclopedia” problem\n The “pleasing” problem\n Behind the scenes:\n National “creativity crisis”\n 10%- 20% “non-graduates”\n 20% of K-12 learners in Minnesota are not in a “traditional” neighborhood school (2008-2009)\nCultural perception and emphasis on “intelligence” and academic achievement over creativity- now a crisis.\n The correlation to lifetime creative accomplishment was more than three times stronger for childhood creativity than childhood IQ.Newsweek\n6 areas of creavity- dropped in 20 years 4-36% (greatest drop in “elaboration” area\n\n Encyclopedias-- parents bought huge printed set. Defining knowledge, making it available. Now: Totally out of date, can’t get rid of them. On display at Sears for “atmosphere.” Large institutions are limited in ability to change their stories i.e. grasp and implement change. \n\nwillrich45\n  \nMore often than not, trying to make sense of the #edreform conversation makes my head hurt. All about knowing more, not learning more.\nless than a minute ago via TweetDeck\n\nCurriculum decisions made by 9-11 old white guys from Harvard in 1892, tweaked by fears unleashed by Sputnik in 1957, and worsened by 1983’s “A Nation at Risk” Where the post-war/pre-sputnik educational concerns were largely demographic—first the colleges trying to accommodate returning veterans, the likes of which had not been seen before, then quickly the schools doing the same for the young baby boomers. In contrast, the post-Sputnik concerns were curricular, focusing on what was being taught and how, rather than who was being taught. Another difference between the two eras was the assignment of blame. The military and the politicians received the blame for Pearl Harbor, not educators; in the Sputnik instance, the finger of blame quickly and sternly pointed at the schools. The third difference has to do with the public perception of the outcomes of the two reform movements: the first is almost unanimously regarded as a great success, a milestone in the history of American education not unlike that of the Morrill Act in the last century, while the second is widely regarded as having failed. http://www.nationalacademies.org/sputnik/ruther1.htm\n Typical story: educating good citizens, providing common ground and equal opportunity. \n Fear\n Control\n Competition\n\nMany teachers are fabulously successful, and excellent-- based on the succesof their students by the traditional understandings. Teachers being prepared fror traditional model of the classroom-- Richardson\n\nDefinition of success is “book smartness”, which is actually based on passive recall. \nSpeaking to you as someone who has worked outside of the traditional boxes\n\ngrad rate stats: http://www.all4ed.org/files/Minnesota_wc.pdf \n\nMany people believe that if you can get people a good education, they can get themselves out of poverty. Almost backwards. No matter how much you stuff people full of knowledge, particularly knowledge irrelevant to their personal situation, their daily circumstances will always loom larger than an imagined potential. If you are in constant physical pain, it makes it hard to do anything else. Same here with hunger and desperation which create physcial and psychological pain.\n
  • No one size fits all-- and this applies to diverity within the gifted learners as well as the difference between gifted learners and other. Learning must be: \n ongoing\n cooperative\n distributed\n diverse\n autonomous \n personally significant\n “I store my learning in my friends” We need to “demystify” education-- make it relevant, meaningful, not abstract “well-roundedness.” Find out what energizes you-- even if not talented, it could have a transferable element to another domain (editing, rearranging closets- J. Fox)\n
  • No one size fits all-- and this applies to diverity within the gifted learners as well as the difference between gifted learners and other. Learning must be: \n ongoing\n cooperative\n distributed\n diverse\n autonomous \n personally significant\n “I store my learning in my friends” We need to “demystify” education-- make it relevant, meaningful, not abstract “well-roundedness.” Find out what energizes you-- even if not talented, it could have a transferable element to another domain (editing, rearranging closets- J. Fox)\n
  • No one size fits all-- and this applies to diverity within the gifted learners as well as the difference between gifted learners and other. Learning must be: \n ongoing\n cooperative\n distributed\n diverse\n autonomous \n personally significant\n “I store my learning in my friends” We need to “demystify” education-- make it relevant, meaningful, not abstract “well-roundedness.” Find out what energizes you-- even if not talented, it could have a transferable element to another domain (editing, rearranging closets- J. Fox)\n
  • http://www.ingeniosus.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/PROFILES-BEST-REVISED-MATRIX-2010.pdf\n
  • Acknowledges complexity\nAs Richard Rothstein reminds us, all school-related variables combined can explain only about one-third of the variation in student achievement; most is due to non-school factors. Still, even to the extent that the quality of teaching does matter, Futernick argues that "variations in teaching performance flow largely from variables that have little to do with the qualities of teachers themselves." Lousy classrooms are more likely due to "poorly functioning systems than [to] individual [teachers'] shortcomings.... There is simply no shortcut to helping educators "cultivate an active intelligence that allows them to negotiate principles, practices, students' needs, and the ever-changing classroom and school environment." In short, says Wilson (in a sentence that ought to be emailed to every administrator and consultant in the country), "Good teaching doesn't rest on specific practices, but on how well the educator actively thinks through hundreds of decisions that no program can script." To try to mandate specific practices -- and Wilson offers some disconcerting examples relating to "literacy systems" -- not only doesn't help teachers to become more accomplished, flexible thinkers; it gets in the way." Alfie Kohn http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alfie-kohn/operation-discourage-brig_b_777148.html\n\nDeborahMersino\n  \nWhat's interesting to note about Type 6 support is that it involves removing time/space restrictions at school. #gtchat\n
  • Acknowledges complexity\nAs Richard Rothstein reminds us, all school-related variables combined can explain only about one-third of the variation in student achievement; most is due to non-school factors. Still, even to the extent that the quality of teaching does matter, Futernick argues that "variations in teaching performance flow largely from variables that have little to do with the qualities of teachers themselves." Lousy classrooms are more likely due to "poorly functioning systems than [to] individual [teachers'] shortcomings.... There is simply no shortcut to helping educators "cultivate an active intelligence that allows them to negotiate principles, practices, students' needs, and the ever-changing classroom and school environment." In short, says Wilson (in a sentence that ought to be emailed to every administrator and consultant in the country), "Good teaching doesn't rest on specific practices, but on how well the educator actively thinks through hundreds of decisions that no program can script." To try to mandate specific practices -- and Wilson offers some disconcerting examples relating to "literacy systems" -- not only doesn't help teachers to become more accomplished, flexible thinkers; it gets in the way." Alfie Kohn http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alfie-kohn/operation-discourage-brig_b_777148.html\nIQ is only a very limited aspect of this-- programs based on aIQ are not “the” answer-- only an ansewr to a small subset of gifts, potential talent.\nDeborahMersino\n  \nWhat's interesting to note about Type 6 support is that it involves removing time/space restrictions at school. #gtchat\n
  • Sustainability\n
  • \n
  • Take Mr. Shain’s alma mater, Princeton, whose freshman class this year is 37 percent minority students, 17 percent athletes, 13 percent legacies and 11 percent international students. “Among very, very good schools, a huge percentage of the class is not in play on academic grounds,” he says. “How much can you improve the class when you’re only working with half or less?” http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/education/edlife/07HOOVER-t.html?_r=3&adxnnl=1&partner=rss&emc=rss&pagewanted=6&adxnnlx=1288972850-lKQWcBB5WXwRrzW2+u79QA “Out of more than 50 people I hired in the last 6 years, I didn't hire one single person because of their university education … In fact from my experience good grades at a university generally tend to be more of a negative indicator than a positive....Top students were typically people who created massive social friction in my teams, under delivered and were very slow in adapting to change...”\n http://bjoernlasse.posterous.com/the-illusion-of-disrupting-vs-repairing-the-e\n
  • In 2008, Americans consumed information for about 1.3 trillion hours, an average of almost 12 hours per day. Consumption totaled 3.6 zettabytes and 10,845 trillion words, corresponding to 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes for an average person on an average day. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, a million million gigabytes. These estimates are from an analysis of more than 20 different sources of information, from very old (newspapers and books) to very new (portable computer games, satellite radio, and Internet video). Information at work is not included. http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo_research_report_consum.php\nDefault overlaod coping strategies: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/jason.frand/researcher/articles/info_overload.html\nThe first coping mechanism identified by Miller is the strategy of omission, or the temporary non-processing of information. This is essentially a state of mental fatigue where we feel as if we are spread much too thin. The feeling that we just cannot deal with all the information flowing to us results in our ignoring or failing to process some of the information.\nA second coping strategy is processing information readily at hand, even if it is bad or incorrect information. This describes the concept of GIGO or "garbage in, garbage out." W orking with poor information at the start This involves working with information that may not be the best and making decisions or acting based upon this information. This effectively casts doubt on thethe outcomes of actions and decisions made using this information because of working with poor information at the start. For example, it is not uncommon to observe an individual performing a search on the World Wide Web and using only the first few items in the results whether they are good or not.\nA third strategy is queuing or delaying the processing of some information with the hope of catching up later. In other words, we may stack up a bunch of information believing we can go through it all at once at a later time. Unfortunately the flow of information does not always slow enough to get back to those piles.\nA fourth strategy is information filtering or looking at information at a higher level and saying, "I will go through this and I won't go through that." It is putting items into categories then working with those categories of information, prior to working with the information itself.\nA fifth strategy is simply walking away from the task.\nA sixth strategy is generalizing ? using minimal information to draw broad conclusions. This is akin to reading only the headlines of a newspaper and speaking as if knowing the details of the articles.\n
  • In 2008, Americans consumed information for about 1.3 trillion hours, an average of almost 12 hours per day. Consumption totaled 3.6 zettabytes and 10,845 trillion words, corresponding to 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes for an average person on an average day. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, a million million gigabytes. These estimates are from an analysis of more than 20 different sources of information, from very old (newspapers and books) to very new (portable computer games, satellite radio, and Internet video). Information at work is not included. http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo_research_report_consum.php\nDefault overlaod coping strategies: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/jason.frand/researcher/articles/info_overload.html\nThe first coping mechanism identified by Miller is the strategy of omission, or the temporary non-processing of information. This is essentially a state of mental fatigue where we feel as if we are spread much too thin. The feeling that we just cannot deal with all the information flowing to us results in our ignoring or failing to process some of the information.\nA second coping strategy is processing information readily at hand, even if it is bad or incorrect information. This describes the concept of GIGO or "garbage in, garbage out." W orking with poor information at the start This involves working with information that may not be the best and making decisions or acting based upon this information. This effectively casts doubt on thethe outcomes of actions and decisions made using this information because of working with poor information at the start. For example, it is not uncommon to observe an individual performing a search on the World Wide Web and using only the first few items in the results whether they are good or not.\nA third strategy is queuing or delaying the processing of some information with the hope of catching up later. In other words, we may stack up a bunch of information believing we can go through it all at once at a later time. Unfortunately the flow of information does not always slow enough to get back to those piles.\nA fourth strategy is information filtering or looking at information at a higher level and saying, "I will go through this and I won't go through that." It is putting items into categories then working with those categories of information, prior to working with the information itself.\nA fifth strategy is simply walking away from the task.\nA sixth strategy is generalizing ? using minimal information to draw broad conclusions. This is akin to reading only the headlines of a newspaper and speaking as if knowing the details of the articles.\n
  • In 2008, Americans consumed information for about 1.3 trillion hours, an average of almost 12 hours per day. Consumption totaled 3.6 zettabytes and 10,845 trillion words, corresponding to 100,500 words and 34 gigabytes for an average person on an average day. A zettabyte is 10 to the 21st power bytes, a million million gigabytes. These estimates are from an analysis of more than 20 different sources of information, from very old (newspapers and books) to very new (portable computer games, satellite radio, and Internet video). Information at work is not included. http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo_research_report_consum.php\nDefault overlaod coping strategies: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/jason.frand/researcher/articles/info_overload.html\nThe first coping mechanism identified by Miller is the strategy of omission, or the temporary non-processing of information. This is essentially a state of mental fatigue where we feel as if we are spread much too thin. The feeling that we just cannot deal with all the information flowing to us results in our ignoring or failing to process some of the information.\nA second coping strategy is processing information readily at hand, even if it is bad or incorrect information. This describes the concept of GIGO or "garbage in, garbage out." W orking with poor information at the start This involves working with information that may not be the best and making decisions or acting based upon this information. This effectively casts doubt on thethe outcomes of actions and decisions made using this information because of working with poor information at the start. For example, it is not uncommon to observe an individual performing a search on the World Wide Web and using only the first few items in the results whether they are good or not.\nA third strategy is queuing or delaying the processing of some information with the hope of catching up later. In other words, we may stack up a bunch of information believing we can go through it all at once at a later time. Unfortunately the flow of information does not always slow enough to get back to those piles.\nA fourth strategy is information filtering or looking at information at a higher level and saying, "I will go through this and I won't go through that." It is putting items into categories then working with those categories of information, prior to working with the information itself.\nA fifth strategy is simply walking away from the task.\nA sixth strategy is generalizing ? using minimal information to draw broad conclusions. This is akin to reading only the headlines of a newspaper and speaking as if knowing the details of the articles.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Schools as “scarcity-generating institutions.”\nJust i time learning is no longer the advancement we are seeking- Now we need to have the ability to tap into situational learning. HOw to contact those who do have the knowledge-- not just to acquire it for ourselves, but to bring this expertise into the fold of problem solving. How to indietify, adapt to and/or recover from imperfect information, to too much information.\n\n Three metaphorial interpretations: \nTeacher is Lucy, students are the candy\nStudents are Lucy, standards are the candy\nWe as adults are Lucy, candy is information/life and scene is how we re struggling to cope with all of it.\n\nThis is AP coursework\n\n
  • Yes, you can learn it just in time, and that’s sometimes necessary, but how good is that learning? You don’t have time to become the expert- you need to find the expert. Not just-in-time Content: just in tie connection\n
  • Yes, you can learn it just in time, and that’s sometimes necessary, but how good is that learning? You don’t have time to become the expert- you need to find the expert. Not just-in-time Content: just in tie connection\n
  • Yes, you can learn it just in time, and that’s sometimes necessary, but how good is that learning? You don’t have time to become the expert- you need to find the expert. Not just-in-time Content: just in tie connection\n
  • http://www.evaluationcanada.ca/distribution/20090601_quinn_patton_michael_a.pdf; \n\nSimple: follow a recipe\nComplicated: build a rocket\nComplex: Raise a child\n
  • Since the fifteenth century, knowledge conceptualized as a straight-line kind of thing. The invention of curriculum. Ramus (ramifications).\n\nWhen is content emphasis appropriate? 1. As a stepping stone based on learner’s own assessment of need. 2. As a way to get “coverage” done quickly. Either way, a lot less of it needs to be done, and if you follow even the most conservative argument, gifted kids can get it done much faster-- why drag it out. \n\n\n
  • Since the fifteenth century, knowledge conceptualized as a straight-line kind of thing. The invention of curriculum. Ramus (ramifications).\n\nWhen is content emphasis appropriate? 1. As a stepping stone based on learner’s own assessment of need. 2. As a way to get “coverage” done quickly. Either way, a lot less of it needs to be done, and if you follow even the most conservative argument, gifted kids can get it done much faster-- why drag it out. \n\n\n
  • \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • Even the AP folks market their materials to gifted by using the “depth and complexity” buzzphrase/ You wnat complexity? I’ll give you complexity! \n
  • the only people who aren’t really talking about it are teachers\n
  • the only people who aren’t really talking about it are teachers\n
  • the only people who aren’t really talking about it are teachers\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • If there is still going to be a role for some sort of centralized leadership in learning-- now the classroom teacher-- it is going to be as a facilitator: as broker, agent, psychologist.. Learning does not need to be in advance, it also doesn’t need to be “just in time” because it’s available in the environment-- a slight difference. Need to correct impression that going into teaching means you’re going to help kids by dispensing knowledge.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n

Connected autonomy and talent development Connected autonomy and talent development Presentation Transcript

  • New
stories
for
learning
 
 Connected
autonomy
and
talent
developmentCarmen
Tschofen Minnesota
Educators
of
the
tschofen@email.com Gifted
and
Talented
slideshare: February
7,
2011
  • A
travel
story
  • A
family
story
  • A
family
story ‣School
choice ‣Alternative
learning ‣Dual
enrollment ‣Supplemental
enrollment ‣Community
schooling ‣Exchange
programs ‣Homeschooling ‣Unschooling
  • A
learning
story
  • A
learning
story Gifted
models ‣Pull
out
model ‣Push
in
model ‣Cluster
grouping ‣Special
classes ‣School‐wide
 enrichment ‣Acceleration/ Compacting ‣Full
time
grouping
  • The
stories
we
create:
 The
Overton
Window S.O.P Outdated Optimal Outrageous ~Mackinac Center for Public Policy
  • The
stories
we
create:
 The
Overton
Window Obstacles Structural Conceptual S.O.P Worldview Psychological Neuroscience Optimal Outdated Optimal Outrageous ~Mackinac Center for Public Policy (modified C. Tschofen 10/10)
  • Stories
we
can’t
afford
  • Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as...
  • Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines
  • Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines ‣Weapons
of
world
domination
  • Stories
we
can’t
afford Gifted
children
as... ‣Economic
engines ‣Weapons
of
world
domination ‣Academic
(testing)
wonders
  • Small,
old
stories
  • ‣Age
groups ‣School ‣Classrooms ‣Subjects ‣Grading ‣Sequences
and
diplomasSmall,
old
stories
  • Legacy
stories
  • Legacy
stories‣ In
2025:
4
year
college
=
$400,000
 (current
rate
of
increase)‣ Past
20
years:
tuition,
room,
board
and
fees,
 increased
at
a
rate
6
x
greater
than
the
 increase
in
the
average
earnings
of
college
 graduates.‣ Past
10
years:
college
graduates
earnings
 have
fallen.
Lataif,
Louis
E.
Universities
On
The
Brink

http://www.forbes.com/2011/02/01/college‐education‐bubble‐opinions‐contributors‐louis‐lataif_print.html

  • Legacy
stories 70%
of
high
school
graduates
 enroll
in
college

http://completionagenda.collegeboard.org/reports
  • Legacy
stories 70%
of
high
school
graduates
 enroll
in
college

 57
%

of
those
graduate
http://completionagenda.collegeboard.org/reports
  • Legacy
storiesCollege
students,
last
12
months:
 ‣30%
so
depressed
that
it
was
 difficult
to
function
 ‣49%
reported
overwhelming
 anxiety ‣10%
diagnosed
or
treated
for
 depression
(reported) ‣6%
seriously
considered
suicide American
College
Health
Association,
2008
  • Legacy
stories
  • Misleading
stories...
  • Misleading
stories..."The
digital
facelift"

 Clay
Shirky
  • Misleading
stories?Learning
technology
phases:‣ Textbook
on
a
screen‣ Enrichment/
“motivation”‣ Universe
in
a
box‣ Walled
“social”
garden‣ All‐seeing
eye/Technological
embrace
  • Leading
stories“...for
the
first
time
we
are
understanding
the
act
of
learning
as
a
response
to
changes
in
the
learning
environment,
rather
than
as
an
adaptation
to
a
predetermined
learning
system.”Bouchard,
Paul.
Network
Promises
and
Their
Implications,

January
2011http://rusc.uoc.edu/ojs/index.php/rusc/article/viewFile/v8n1‐bouchard/v8n1‐bouchard‐eng
  • Stories
of
connection
  • Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social
  • Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social ‣ (Physical:
 geographic/kinesthetic)
  • Stories
of
connection Connectivism
 ‣ Biological/Neurological ‣ Conceptual ‣ Social ‣ (Physical:
 geographic/kinesthetic) Stories
of
human
beings

  • Betts’
2010
revised
profiles
of
the
gifted
and
talented The
Successful The
Creative The
Underground The
At‐Risk The
Twice/Multi‐Exceptional The
Autonomous
Learner
  • “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents... “To
lead
a
good
life”
  • Academics formal learning teachers Provisions Schools “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents... “To
lead
a
good
life”
  • Mindset/Environment Gifts Expertness Academics formal learning teachers Provisions Tribes Networks Communities Schools “Passion‐based”Gifts
to
Talents...to
Tribes “To
lead
a
good
life”
  • Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  • Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  • Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  • Seth
Godin
on
the
tribes
we
lead
http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html

  • Three
new
frames
of
understanding
  • Three
new
frames
of
understanding ‣ Information
Abundance ‣ Complexity ‣ Networks
  • Information
AbundanceAn
information
story 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  • Information
AbundanceAn
information
story 10,000%
increase
in
information
in
6
years (digital
output) 500
Exabytes
=
500,000,000,000
Gigabytes In
books:
13
stacks
from
Earth
to
Pluto 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  • Information
AbundanceAn
information
story Printing
it
would
deforest
the
planet...
 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  • Information
AbundanceAn
information
story Printing
it
would
deforest
the
planet...
 ...12
times 21st
Century
Fluency
Project:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ECAVxbfsfc
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers= 204
books
of
“knowledge”
  • Information
AbundanceDoing
the
math
 12
years
of
school
x
6
subjects
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
subject/year+ 4
years
of
college
x
8
courses
per
year
 with
1
textbook
per
course+ a
generous
100
books
for
research
papers= 204
books
of
“knowledge”Schools
as
“scarcity‐generating
institutions.”
  • Information
AbundanceAn
analogous
story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wp3m1vg06Q
  • Information
AbundanceAn
analogous
story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wp3m1vg06Q
  • Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning
  • Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning Many
educators...consider
the
principle
...
“Give
a
 man
a
fish
and
feed
him
for
a
day,
teach
a
man
to
 fish
and
feed
him
for
a
lifetime,”
to
represent
 the
height
of
educational
practice
today.
 Yet
it
is
hardly
cutting
edge.
 It
assumes
that
there
will
always
be
an
endless
 supply
of
fish
to
catch
and
that
the
techniques
for
 catching
them
will
last
a
lifetime.
And
therein
lies
 the
major
pitfall
of
the
twenty‐first
 century’s
teaching
model... 
Thomas
and
Brown,
A
New
Culture
of
Learning,
in
press
  • Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning A
real
challenge
for
any
learning
theory
is
 to
actuate
known
knowledge
at
the
point
 of
application.
When
knowledge,
however,
 is
needed,
but
not
known,
the
ability
to
 [locate
and
integrate]
sources
to
meet
the
 requirements
becomes
a
vital
skill.
 George
Siemens
(2005)
  • Information
AbundanceBeyond
Just‐In‐Time
Learning ‣ Just
in
time
information ‣ Just
in
time
skill ‣ Just
in
time
connection
  • ComplexityZone
of
complexity Michael Quinn Patton, 2009
  • ComplexityZone
of
complexity Connective
and
 Inquiry‐based
 personal
learning and
personalized
 learning
Standardized
 Michael Quinn Patton, 2009 Modified: C. Tschofen 10/10content
and

 instruction
  • NetworksNetwork
Stories
  • NetworksNetwork
Stories
  • NetworksNetwork
Stories Core‐periphery
network http://www.monitorinstitute.com/
  • NetworksQualities
of
networked
learning ‣Text‣ Diversity ‣ Interactivity‣ Autonomy ‣ Openness





(Downes
2005)
  • Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners?
  • Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners? Gifted
students:
 Make
greater
use
of
learning
strategies
 [representing]
the
triadic
spectrum
for
self‐ regulating
learning,
managing: ‣ personal
processes
 ‣ behavior
 ‣ environment In
addition
to
peer
assistance,
gifted
students
 sought
significantly
more
adult
assistance
than
 did
regular
students. Student
Differences
in
Self‐Regulated
Learning:
Relating
Grade,
Sex,
and
Giftedness
to
Self‐Efficacy
and
Strategy
 Use
Zimmerman
and
Martinez‐Pons,
1990
  • Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners?“If
there
is
one
word
that
makes
creative
people
different
from
others,
it
is
the
word
complexity.
Instead
of
being
an
individual,
they
are
a
multitude.”
 Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi

  • Why
is
this
right
for
gifted
learners? A
gifted
individual
is
a
quick
and
clever
thinker,
 who
is
able
to
deal
with
complex
matters;
an
 individual
who
is
autonomous,
curious
and
 passionate;
a
sensitive
and
emotionally
rich
 person,
who
is
living
intensely.

He
or
she
is
a
 person
who
enjoys
being
creative. Nauta
and
Ronner,
2009.
Giftedness
in
the
Work
Environment:
Backgrounds
and
Practical
Recommendations.
 http://www.sengifted.org/articles_adults/nauta_and_ronner_giftedness_in_the_work_environment.pdf
  • Why
this
right
for
talent
development?
  • Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom
  • Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom “Relative
experts
are
not
merely
better
at
doing
the
same
things
 that
others
do;
they
do
things
differently,
and
the
same
differences
 appear
in
various
domains."

 Bereiter
and
Scardamalia
(1986)
  • Why
this
right
for
talent
development? 
"We
were
looking
for
exceptional
kids
and
what
we
found
were
 exceptional
conditions."

 Benjamin
Bloom “Relative
experts
are
not
merely
better
at
doing
the
same
things
 that
others
do;
they
do
things
differently,
and
the
same
differences
 appear
in
various
domains."

 Bereiter
and
Scardamalia
(1986) “Expertise,
whether
demonstrated
in
such
everyday
feats
as
reading
 and
writing,
or
in
the
exceptional
accomplishments
of
artists,
 athletes,
and
scholars,
reflects
the
outcome
of
people’s
active
 engagement
in
the
world
around
them.”

 Cianciolo,
Sternberg,
and
Wagner

(2006)

  • What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”

  • What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Your
goal
as
a
parent
is
to
foster
your
childs
 development,
not
to
impress
other
adults
 with
your
parenting
skills... The
most
significant
and
potentially
valuable
 influence
you
can
have
on
your
child
comes
 from
macromanagement
of
the
 environment,
not
from
micromanagement
 of
your
childs
behavior.
 Dr.
Peter
Gray,
Boston
College
  • What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Interest
in
apprenticeship
has
been
 keen
in
the
K‐
12
reform
conversation...
 [whereby]
one
of
the
things
people
 notice...
is
how
utterly
teacher‐ dependent
American
education
has
 become.
Even
at
the
college
level...
We
 preach
the
goal
of
preparing
 independent
learners,
but
... Theodore
J.
Marchese
1998
 The
New
Conversations
About
Learning: Insights
From
Neuroscience
and
Anthropology,
 Cognitive
Science
and
Workplace
Studies

  • What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Interest
in
apprenticeship
has
been
 Does
passion
in
fact
 keen
in
the
K‐
12
reform
conversation...
 re‐shape
our
brains
 [whereby]
one
of
the
things
people
 in
ways
that
make
it
 notice...
is
how
utterly
teacher‐ dependent
American
education
has
 harder
and
harder
 become.
Even
at
the
college
level...
We
 for
those
who
lack
 preach
the
goal
of
preparing
 this
passion
to
 independent
learners,
but
... compete
with
us? Theodore
J.
Marchese
1998
 Edge
Perspectives
with
John
Hagel:
 The
New
Conversations
About
Learning: Passion
and
Plasticity
‐
 Insights
From
Neuroscience
and
Anthropology,
 The
Neurobiology
of
Passion Cognitive
Science
and
Workplace
Studies

  • What
makes
this
something
other
than
“a
parent
thing?”
 Future
of
Learning,
MacArthur
Foundation,
2009: ‣ Self‐Learning ‣ Horizontal
Structures ‣ From
Presumed
Authority
to
Collective
Credibility ‣ A
De‐Centered
Pedagogy
 ‣ Networked
Learning ‣ Open
Source
Education ‣ Learning
as
Connectivity
and
Interactivity ‣ Lifelong
Learning ‣ Learning
Institutions
as
Mobilizing
Networks ‣ Flexible
Scalability
and
Simulation Davidson and Goldberg. Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. MIT Press, 2009. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/chapters/Future_of_Learning.pdf
  • A
New
Culture
of
Learning
  • A
New
Culture
of
LearningCulture
of
teaching Culture
of
learning Culture
emerges
from
the
The
culture
is
the
environment environment,
grows
with
it Playful,
information‐rich
The
classroom
as
a
model surroundingsTeaching
us
about
the
world Learning
through
engagement
 within
the
worldStudents
must
prove
that
they
 All
embrace
what
we
don’t
know,
have
received
the
information
 come
up
with
better
questions
transferred;
that
they
quite
 about
it,
and
continue
asking...literally
“get
it.” 
Thomas
and
Brown,
A
New
Culture
of
Learning,
in
press
  • A
New
Culture
of
Learning? Barnett Berry, et al, January 2011
  • Connective
Educators ‣Technical
competence ‣Experimentation ‣Autonomy ‣Creation ‣Play ‣Capacity
for
complexity (George
Siemens,

2010)
  • Connective
Educators
  • Connective
Educators KnowledgeWorks
Learning
Agents
for
2020 ‣Learning
Fitness
Instructor ‣Personal
Education
Advisor ‣Community
Intelligence
Cartographer ‣Education
Sousveyor ‣Social
Capital
Platform
Developer ‣Learning
Partner ‣Learning
Journey
Mentor ‣Assessment
Designer http://www.futureofed.org/about/LearningAgents/
  • Connective
Educators Instead
of
focusing
on
teaching
as
an
 undifferentiated
whole...look
at
the
specific
needs
 of
students,
identifying
where
...
more
 appropriately
focused
services
would
offer
the
 needed
support... Downes,
Stephen.
The
Role
of
the
Educator
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stephen‐downes/the‐role‐ of‐the‐educator_b_790937.html Agitator,
Alchemist,
Bureaucrat
,
Coach,
Collector,
Connector,
Convener,
 Coordinator,
Critic,
Curator,
Demonstrator,
Designer,
Evaluator,
Facilitator,
 Learner,
Lecturer,
Mentor,
Moderator,
Programmer,
Salesperson,
Sharer,
Tech
 Support
  • What
does
connected
autonomy
in
gifted
learners
look
like?

  • Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Farmer’s Frog Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  • Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  • Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  • Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Frog Farmer’s Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal performa Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  • Professional Design Participation Crochet & Fleadh Instructi Amusem Craft & EngineerinClassical Violin Irish Fiddle Peter Music Online Maker Online Culture/ Global Schedulin CommunityInternatio nal Farmer’s Frog Market Mary Video Analysis & Circus Sharing Movement /Dance Ecologic Urban Gifted Uprigh alawarenes t Child Sponsore Environme d ntal Alternative Clowning School Traditiona / l School Social and conceptual learning network, S.T., age 14
  • The
big
picture
of
connected
autonomy

  • The
big
picture
of
connected
autonomy
 Learners
 understand
 how
they
are
 uniquely
 connected
and
 able
to
 contribute
in
 the
world.
  • Saying
“yes”
  • Connected learning for educators PLEK12 Personal Learning Environments for Inquiry in K-12 An Open Course for Educators Across the Globe COURSE DATE: February 7, 2011 through April 3, 2011 College of Education • University of Florida PLEK12 is a free, open course--there are no financial obligations to attend. http://bit.ly/hviMvl
  • Carmen
TschofenRobbinsdale,
Minnesotatschofen@email.comTwitter:
ctschoSkype:
ctschof