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Psych Diversity Project Revised

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Group project for PSY430: Psychology of Diversity

Group project for PSY430: Psychology of Diversity

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Transcript

  • 1.
    • AMANDA LEBOUTHILLIER
    • ANDY
    • RONALD TSANG
  • 2. A Glimpse into Japanese Culture As A Whole
  • 3.
    • Japan is considered a collectivist culture
    • They emphasize discipline and harmony with nature
    Collectivist vs. Individualistic Culture
  • 4. Japanese Etiquette
    • Bowing
      • Performed upon meeting someone.
      • Children learn to bow at a very young age.
      • The longer and deeper the bow: the stronger the emotion and respect is expressed.
  • 5. “ Meishi”
    • “ Meishi” means business cards.
    • Business cards are handled with utmost care and attention.
    • Business cards or “Meishi” are often how a person in Japan introduces themselves to new people.
    • When exchanging these cards the person of a lower status will present their card first while the individual of higher status will pass their card last.
    • The proper way to receive Meishi is to grasp it with both hands and read it as soon as you receive it. It is considered an insult to just put it away without taking the time to read it.
  • 6. Work
    • “ In Japan a job means identification with a larger entity, through which people gain pride and the feeling of being part of something significant” (Gannon, 2005, p. 45)
    • When people are asked what they do they simply respond with where they work rather than their occupation.
    • Work is usually assigned to various office groups and is viewed as a collective effort so the company rewards the office group and not a single individual for a job well done.
  • 7. Work cont..
    • Currently more and more women are giving up the life of a family for a career.
    • To unwind from work it is socially acceptable to let your hair down so to speak; without fear of repercussions, in other words getting drunk after work is not frowned upon.
    • “ Drinking and even drunkenness are good-naturedly tolerated and even encouraged…almost anything people do while drunk, except for driving, is considered forgivable” (Gannon, 2005, p. 49).
  • 8.
    • JAPAN PERMITS MANY RELIGIONS BUT THE MAIN ONE WOULD BE BUDDHISM.
    Religion
  • 9.
    • GARDENS PROVIDE THE PEOPLE OF JAPAN A PLACE TO FIND HARMONY AND PEACE.
    • A GARDEN IN THE MIDDLE OF A BUSY CITY PROVIDES AN ESCAPE FROM STRESS AND A PLACE TO REFLECT, PAUSE AND COMMUNE WITH NATURE (GANNON, 2005, P.48).
    Gardens
  • 10.
    • Wet Garden
    • Dry Garden
    • Wet gardens possess some form of body of water such as a pond.
    • Dry gardens consist of rocks and pebbles arranged in ways to simulate water.
    Two Types of Gardens
  • 11. Wet Garden
  • 12. Dry Gardens
  • 13.
    • THE EDUCATION SYSTEM CONSISTS OF:
        • 6 years of elementary school
        • 3 years of junior high school
        • 3 years of senior high school
        • And if one chooses 4 more years of college
    Education
  • 14. Average School Day
    • The school day lasts for around 6 hours.
    • Students are given six weeks of summer vacation and two weeks for winter vacation although there is often homework assigned over these vacations.
    • The school year begins in April and ends in March of the following year.
  • 15. What is Expected of a Japanese Student?
    • “ The word studying is life-long…one studies how to be a wife, mother, a coworker and perhaps even a retiree. Creating a positive attitude toward study in the early years is crucial to further academic and social success”
    • Stevenson, Lee, and Nerison-Low (1998)
    • Both students and parents show tremendous respect towards their professors and schools.
    • Academic excellence is stressed early in the academic life of the young student and many families allow their children to focus on studying in lieu of their chores.
    • Students experience a lot of pressure from their families to excel in school and they believe that encouraging children from a young age makes them more enthusiastic about learning and doing well.
  • 16.
    • The Japanese student life applies to this proverb; “the protruding nail will be hammered” (Gannon, 2005, p. 45).
    • This refers to the issue of a student not fitting in with his/her peers. Although, many students don’t have a problem with this but if they do, life can be intolerable.
    • Bullying results in several deaths each year and it continues to increase.
  • 17. High School
    • High school is very competitive. It is treated the way we treat college in the U.S.
    • Students have to pass an entrance exam in order to get accepted and people often travel in order to attend a top school.
  • 18. Introduction: Technology
    • Japan has the third world’s largest budget towards scientific research, technology, machinery and medical research at $130 billion dollars.
    • Japan has been known for it’s advancement in technology and reinvention of items throughout the world
      • Was the first country to perfect and market HDTV
      • Bullet Train
      • Hexagonal Pencils
      • Processes more than half of the worlds industrial robots
  • 19. Japanese Creation’s
  • 20. Japanese Technology FAQ’s
    • Toyota first came to America in 1952
    • Mario was invented by Nintendo in 1985
    • First Bullet train invented in 1964
    • Sony was founded by Masaru Ibuka and Akio Morita in 1946
    • Hello Kitty was invented in 1974 and brought to the United States in 1976
  • 21. Technology and Teen’s
    • Although the Japanese culture is very strict on education, growing technology has affected the generation’s way of learning, social networking and free time.
  • 22. How Has Technology Influenced the Youth?
    • Easy access to the media allows for expanded education as well as new invention which create a better learning environment
      • Smart Boards
      • Learning Programs
    • Cell phone use has impacted youth all around the world, including Japan, affecting grades, social dependency, and health issues
      • Hyper-Texting
      • Cheating
      • Social Anxiety
  • 23. Japanese Gaming Technology
    • Nintendo Ds/i
      • Released in 2004
        • Interactive touch screen gaming
        • Later reinvented it with dual camera sensor
    • Nintendo Wii
      • Released in 2006
        • Brought about a revolutionized way to gaming
        • Physical activity
  • 24. Technology & Education http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmvCdZJz-As
  • 25. Technology & Education Cont’d
    • By 2015, every household is expected to have it’s own robot.
    • Government poured $35 million into development of A.I. and design.
    • First robot ever designed was named “Saya”
      • Also used as a receptionist
  • 26. Technology & The Economy 2009 statistic of expenditures by main industries of business enterprises in Japan.
  • 27. Technologies Impact on Japanese Society
    • Had the first face to face phone conversation
    • Push for electric cars in Japan has been exponential
      • Honda Civic Hybrid
      • Toyota Prius
    • Being one of the leaders in technology advancement, the people of Japan have experience all sorts of changes on all levels
      • Sleeping Capsules
  • 28. Japanese high school culture; a look at teen sexuality
  • 29. Safe SEX SELLS!
    • Japan uses more condoms than any other country in the world.
    • 40% of students have unprotected sex their 1 st time.
    • HOWEVER
    • Just 11% admit learning about sex from a reputable source while 49% of students learn from friends.
  • 30. Gravure Girls
    • Appear in Photo shoots clothed, some are elevated to the status of stars much like holliwood movie stars
    • It is a classy version of playboy for adolescents
    • There is an open attraction of boys to girls; dressed
    • Hitomi Kitamura
  • 31. Family TIES that Bind
    • Sex is not usually discussed by parents with children
    • Most parents believe incorrectly that their children are not sexually active
    • Teenage girls perform sexual acts for money is acceptable
    • Parents caution girls not on the ethics of their actions but warn them not to get pregnant
  • 32. Cross Dressing
    • Among Japanese High schoolers a facination exists for boys pretending to be girls or boys dressing as girls
  • 33. Manga Comics
    • Graphical novels told with pictures
    • Believe it or not this is a boy
  • 34. Vasquez et al 2003
    • A quote from an adolescent girl on what it means to be a manly man.
    • It is difficult to state what being manly means. I think it is someone not womanly. Someone manly is someone strong, hard …
    • Girls are weak, I mean physically. In spirit, boys are stronger …
    • Someone manly has a nice appearance. Someone womanly rather than having a nice appearance is warmer, more emotional
  • 35.
    • okama.
    • Differences between males and females are not clear any more…Masaki 17 years old
  • 36. References Gannon, M. & Pillai, R., (2005). Understanding Global Cultures. California, Thousand Oask; SAGE Stevenson, Harold, Lee, Shin-Ying, & Nerison-Low, Roberta. (1998). The Educational System in Japan: Case Study Findings. Washington D.C; OERI   Vasquez. G.C., Kishi. I., (2002). If you say to them that they have to use condoms, some of them might use them. It is like drinking alcohol or smoking’: an educational intervention with Japanese senior high school students. Sex Education , 2, 105-117   Vasquez. G.C., Kishi. I., (2003) Masculinities and Sexuality: the case of a Japanese top ranking senior high school. Journal of Gender Studies , 12, 22-33
  • 37. References
    • http://www.stat.go.jp/english/data/chouki/11.htm
    • Marina Kimimura , Japanese technology: small gadgets, big influence, January 6, 2000, CNN.
    • Mr Masamichi Ishii, National Institute of Science and Technology Policy, http://www.saasta.ac.za/scicom/pcst7/masamichi.pdf
    • http://www.toyoland.com/history.html
    • http://www.nintendo.com/corp/history.jsp

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