Pr2.0r7 B 2009 Update Final
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PR 2.0 : How social media is (and isn’t) ...

PR 2.0 : How social media is (and isn’t)
changing the rules of Public Relations
Presented to the Canadian Public Relations Society
November 8, 2007
Ean Jackson and Troy Angrignon

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Pr2.0r7 B 2009 Update Final Pr2.0r7 B 2009 Update Final Document Transcript

  • PR 2.0 How social media is (and isn’t) changing the rules of Public Relations Presented to the Canadian Public Relations Society November 8, 2007 Ean Jackson and Troy Angrignon EAN: - sales & marketing guy with a background in technology; - passionate about social media, outdoor sports, and ultramarathons and built Club Fat Ass a local success story - teaches Internet Marketing & Applied Technology at the Univ of Phoenix, SFU, and UBC and is currently writing a book about how technology and globalization are impacting the sales function; TROY: - technology entrepreneur active in coaching, mentoring and building technology startups; - also passionate about sustainability and health & fitness
  • The Public Relations industry is changing. It pays to be on the lookout. Things are happening in technology that will impact your profession. Our aim this evening is to give you a feel for some of those things so that you can take advantage of them.
  • In the next hour we will cover five topics Over the course of the next 60-75 minutes, weʼll cover What is PR? How do you do your job today? What is PR 2.0? (The Big Debate) New tools for Public Relations Case Studies Q&A
  • What is Public Relations? What is Public Relations made up of? (WHAT do you do?) It is comprised of at least ten these things: reputation management crisis management product launches product placement broadcast PR issue management investor relations labour relations grassroots PR analyst relations Weʼre going to focus on these three: reputation management, crisis management, and product launches.
  • Let’s take a look at the tools you use for your daily work How do you do this TODAY? (HOW do you do it?) - press releases - fax - wire services - media packages - Microsoft Word - Others? BRIDGE: For the sake of argument, letʼs call what youʼre doing now - PR 1.0. Now, letʼs talk about PR 2.0.
  • So what is PR 2.0? And why is everybody fighting about it? There are a number of conflicting perspectives on what PR 2.0 is and even whether or not itʼs real! Weʼre going to quickly discuss six of those major perspectives here.
  • PR 2.0 is the rebirth of PR! But it’s NOT Web 2.0 www.briansolis.com: PR 2.0 began back in 1995ish as an evolution of PR thinking; It was about becoming more open and more dialogue focused - using the tools of the trade to understand markets and how to reach people at the street level without insulting everybody along the way. It isnʼt social media and social media isnʼt PR 2.0; they inform and complement each other.
  • PR 2.0 is just PR 1.0 + Web 2.0 PR 1.0 press releases and media releases barfed onto blogs! Woohoo! Simple!!
  • PR 2.0 is... http://www.stuartbruce.biz/2006/06/big_pr_firm_fal.html Stuart Bruce thinks that PR 2.0 is really just the same thing that has always been there. That good PR people never had control and never even THOUGHT they had control. Further, he believes that PR was always about relationships and dialogue. “Back in the late 80s when I was studying for my CAM Diploma in Public Relations we were taught all about PR being a two way process. That's why real PR people are far better placed than the advertising folks to participate in social media because it's always been about conversations. Sadly I'll admit that too many PR people still can't think beyond press relations and a company newsletter.”
  • We’re DONE with PR 2.0! Herald the rise of PR 3.0! http://www.prweekus.com/pages/Login.aspx?retUrl=/Industry-enters-a-new-age-PR-30/article/56822/&PageTypeId=2&ArticleId=56822&accessLevel=20 quot;...in 2000, it was already in the midst of a long-running transition from providing focusing on communicating to the media and to the public through the media, to its place in the C-suite where managing corporate reputation, CSR, employee engagement, and boosting sales would be part of the job description. Now public relations is at the beginning of its third age, when it is demonstrating its unique facility for navigating environments where the companies and brands have less and less control. Rather than lamenting the decline of traditional mediaʼs influence, the PR industry is embracing the new platforms and communities that test their creativity and the authenticity of the messages.”
  • “PR Week claims we’re at 3.0... They couldn’t be more wrong” http://www.briansolis.com/2007/04/prweek-claims-industry-enters-age-of-pr.html PRWeek Responds to 3.0 Fallout http://www.webpronews.com/blogtalk/2007/04/26/prweek-responds-to-fallout “ The truth is that many PR people, in fact, most PR people are attacking new media in the same fashion as traditional media – if at all. Remember this is an industry that is guilty of not even reading the publications they pitch, let along blogs, podcasts, etc. “It all started with the technology that enabled the socialization of media, progressed with the people who embraced it to create new content, and it will end when PR can legitimately engage. Then, and only then, will PR 2.0 fold back into PR (without the need for a rev number behind it.) We have a tough road ahead of us, as Iʼve said before, and as many have already written, PR isnʼt invited to the table here. The masses think we donʼt get it, so we have a lot of PR for the PR to undertake.” ... For now, it is the difference between spin and evangelism. ... Itʼs also the difference between storytelling and influence. ... This is an incredible opportunity for the PR industry to escalate its perception by integrating value, direct engagement, and an entirely new set of metrics that prove ROI. Itʼs up to us to put the “pro” back in the PR Professional title. PR 3.0 is only confusing the market more.
  • And some people are just plain pissed off! From the editor of Wired magazine.com: Sorry PR People, Youʼre BLOCKED. I've had it. I get more than 300 emails a day and my problem isn't spam (Cloudmark Desktop solves that nicely), it's PR people. Lazy flacks send press releases to the Editor in Chief of Wired because they can't be bothered to find out who on my staff, if anyone, might actually be interested in what they're pitching. Fact: I am an actual person, not a team assigned to read press releases and distribute them to the right editors and writers (that's editor@wired.com). So fair warning: I only want two kinds of email: those from people I know, and those from people who have taken the time to find out what I'm interested in and composed a note meant to appeal to that (I love those emails; indeed, that's why my email address is public). Everything else gets banned on first abuse. The following is just the last month's list of people and companies who have been added to my Outlook blocked list. All of them have sent me something inappropriate at some point in the past 30 days. Many of them sent press releases; others just added me to a distribution list without asking. If their address gets harvested by spammers by being published here, so be it--turnabout is fair play. There is no getting off this list. If you're on it and have something appropriate to say to me, use a different email address. http://www.longtail.com/the_long_tail/2007/10/sorry-pr-people.html BRIDGE: Where does that leave us?
  • Regardless of the debate, it doesn’t hurt to learn some new tricks
  • You’re still doing the same job. But now you have a lot more tools to work with. Social media releases and social media newsrooms are built on top of good PR move from one-to-many to one-of-many; collaborate and discuss and enter the conversation; micro-chunk your content; make it selectively subscribable; engage directly without fearing the reaction; current models and templates are exactly that - suggestions and templates; having a “Social Media Newsroom” is the beginning, not the end! they should be designed to serve “people” and individuals (with specific interests), not audiences - can you have it be customizable? Good social media PR wonʼt fix bad underlying PR practices.
  • What specifically are some of the tools? blogs LinkedIn Delicious News releases RSS subscriptions and email subscriptions New contact channels Facebook Flickr Technorati Second Life
  • The following case studies will help you put it all together
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Your brand is now in the hands of Google and search engines You need to manage your clientsʼ online reputation or this will happen to you. Your brand isnʼt what YOU say it is, itʼs what GOOGLE says it is!
  • Chrysler launched their new Jeep 2.0 campaign as a fully integrated campaign in Sep 2007. The jury is out on the results as it is too early to tell. But here are the components of the campaign. (Social items are bolded). ]1) portals (using contextual/Google and behavioral/AOL targeting) 2) an IM avatar development program 3) online video 4) virtual quot;test drivesquot; 5) an online fantasy football sponsorship w/print component 6) ads on free music download sites with viral marketing (pass this song on to your friends capability) 7) a TV spot (new) 8) microsites 9) a new campaign site which was redesigned to host rich-media offerings like video vignettes 10) traditional TV with product placement 11) events and bowl games 12) print ads
  • Need to launch a product? You might consider thinking like Jeep. No, really. Chrysler launched their new Jeep 2.0 campaign as a fully integrated campaign in Sep 2007. The jury is out on the results as it is too early to tell. But here are the components of the campaign. (Social items are bolded). ]1) portals (using contextual/Google and behavioral/AOL targeting) 2) an IM avatar development program 3) online video 4) virtual quot;test drivesquot; 5) an online fantasy football sponsorship w/print component 6) ads on free music download sites with viral marketing (pass this song on to your friends capability) 7) a TV spot (new) 8) microsites 9) a new campaign site which was redesigned to host rich-media offerings like video vignettes 10) traditional TV with product placement 11) events and bowl games 12) print ads
  • Need to launch a product? You might consider thinking like Jeep. No, really. Chrysler launched their new Jeep 2.0 campaign as a fully integrated campaign in Sep 2007. The jury is out on the results as it is too early to tell. But here are the components of the campaign. (Social items are bolded). ]1) portals (using contextual/Google and behavioral/AOL targeting) 2) an IM avatar development program 3) online video 4) virtual quot;test drivesquot; 5) an online fantasy football sponsorship w/print component 6) ads on free music download sites with viral marketing (pass this song on to your friends capability) 7) a TV spot (new) 8) microsites 9) a new campaign site which was redesigned to host rich-media offerings like video vignettes 10) traditional TV with product placement 11) events and bowl games 12) print ads
  • Need to launch a product? You might consider thinking like Jeep. No, really. Chrysler launched their new Jeep 2.0 campaign as a fully integrated campaign in Sep 2007. The jury is out on the results as it is too early to tell. But here are the components of the campaign. (Social items are bolded). ]1) portals (using contextual/Google and behavioral/AOL targeting) 2) an IM avatar development program 3) online video 4) virtual quot;test drivesquot; 5) an online fantasy football sponsorship w/print component 6) ads on free music download sites with viral marketing (pass this song on to your friends capability) 7) a TV spot (new) 8) microsites 9) a new campaign site which was redesigned to host rich-media offerings like video vignettes 10) traditional TV with product placement 11) events and bowl games 12) print ads
  • Need to launch a product? You might consider thinking like Jeep. No, really. Chrysler launched their new Jeep 2.0 campaign as a fully integrated campaign in Sep 2007. The jury is out on the results as it is too early to tell. But here are the components of the campaign. (Social items are bolded). ]1) portals (using contextual/Google and behavioral/AOL targeting) 2) an IM avatar development program 3) online video 4) virtual quot;test drivesquot; 5) an online fantasy football sponsorship w/print component 6) ads on free music download sites with viral marketing (pass this song on to your friends capability) 7) a TV spot (new) 8) microsites 9) a new campaign site which was redesigned to host rich-media offerings like video vignettes 10) traditional TV with product placement 11) events and bowl games 12) print ads
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • In crisis? Learn from Dell. (Tell the story of Dell Hell through to their recovery.)
  • Here are a whole litter of suggestions from “The New Rules of PR”: http://www.davidmeermanscott.com/documents/New_Rules_of_PR.pdf • Donʼt just send press releases when “big news” is happening; find good reasons to send them all the time. • Instead of just targeting a handful of journalists, create press releases that appeal directly to your buyers. • Write releases replete with keyword-rich copy. • Create links in releases to deliver potential customers to landing pages on your Web site. • Optimize press release delivery for searching and browsing. • Drive people into the sales process with press releases. • Let the world know about your expertise; • Think like the media: who is my audience? What are their issues? How do they speak? What keywords would THEY use? • Publish your releases through a press service like businesswire, prnewswire, prweb.com, or marketwire.com; • Publish it on your blog/site as well and ensure that it is rich in keyword metadata; • Optimize your site for both searching (finding the answer to a question you already know) and browsing (stumbling through and learning accidentally); • put links into your press release so that it will link back to your site; • donʼt speak gobbledygook - speak in simple language that your audience would use!! • content drives action; lots of press releases shows activity; some buyers use that as a reason to justify buying from you; • Use PR to drive sales; understand your segments; create thought leadership pieces for your segments; create compelling content under those leadership pieces. From Chief Marketer: http://chiefmarketer.com/disciplines/publicrelations/PR_social_media_08052006/ Put your news room on the front page Populate it with good content Donʼt force journalists to log in - they wonʼt Do allow them to sign up for email/RSS
  • Nosing around for resources? www.shiftcommm.com www.briansolis.com www.davidmeermanscott.com www.pr-squared.com www.stoweboyd.com chiefmarketer.com www.toprankblog.com www.webpronews.com Google “PR 2.0” Some links: http://www.briansolis.com/ http://jameswarren.wordpress.com/ http://chiefmarketer.com/disciplines/publicrelations/PR_social_media_08052006/ http://mmanuel.typepad.com/media_guerrilla/2005/09/pr_20.html http://www.mguerrilla.com/media_guerrilla/2005/11/new_school_pr_t.html http://newpr.crispynews.com/ http://www.pr-squared.com/2006/07/shift_releases_pr_20_essential.html http://www.stuartbruce.biz/2006/06/big_pr_firm_fal.html http://thepr2.0universe.com/the-pr-20-university/ http://www.edelman.co.uk/pr2summit http://www.stoweboyd.com/message/2007/01/enough_already_.html http://www.allthingsweb2.com/mtree/PR_2.0/ http://www.connect-utah.com/article.asp?r=1905&iid=47&sid=1 http://www.slideshare.net/tracya/pr-20/ http://www.livingstonbuzz.com/blog/2007/03/28/brian-solis-sheds-light-on-pr-20/ http://www.stuartbruce.biz/2007/04/pr_20_is_pr_10_.html http://www.webpronews.com/blogtalk/2007/02/27/pr-2-0-isnt-web-2-0 http://rocketsciencepr.blogspot.com/2007/03/pondering-pr-20.html http://www.connors.com/capabilities/index.html http://blog.basturea.com/archives/2007/04/23/pr2-jumped-the-shark/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/x180/469548541/ http://overtonecomm.blogspot.com/2007/06/pr-20-is-just-return-to-basics.html http://blogs.bnet.com/pr/?p=53 http://understrictembargo.wordpress.com/2007/08/21/pr-20-over-50-cant-deliver/ http://pr.typepad.com/pr_communications/2007/03/are_you_a_sanct.html http://www.tylerreed.co.za/social-media/social-media-public-relations-pr-20.html http://podtech.wordpress.com/2005/11/04/web-20-meets-pr-20-new-school-pr/ http://www.pr-squared.com/ http://blog.prweb.com/2006/02/pr_20_ebook_dow.html http://www.brianoberkirch.com/2006/07/26/shift-publishes-pr-20-guide/
  • Have Questions? Troy Angrignon Ean Jackson Adventure Capitalist President, Analytics Marketing Inc. troy@troyangrignon.com 604-904-6554 www.troyangrignon.com EJackson@AnalyticsMarketing.com twitter: troyangrignon