THT IAP Certification Presentation Day1 6Dec2010
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THT IAP Certification Presentation Day1 6Dec2010 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. IAP LICENSEE CERTIFICATIONDay 1Barbara BlokpoelRiana van den Bergh6-7 December, 2010Amsterdam
  • 2. Agenda Day 2 – The Intercultural Awareness Profiler (IAP) 09.00 Recap of Day 1 Distribution of IAP profiles IAP supporting materials and features 11.00 Break 11.15 Technical Aspects of the IAP Online 12.30 IAP questionnaire and profile – Q&A 13.00 ~ Lunch ~ 14.00 Practice / Playback 15.15 Break 15.30 Q&A Fons Trompenaars – background IAP research and development 17.00 Wrap up 17.30 End of program
  • 3. Agenda Day 1 – The 7 Dimensions 9:00 Welcome, Introductions, Expectations, Agenda 10.00 Concepts of Culture The 4-R approach How values come to us 10:45 Break 11.00 The 7 Dimensions of Culture 13:00 ~ Lunch ~ 14:00 The 7 Dimensions of Culture (con’t) 15.30 Break 15.45 The 7 Dimensions of Culture (con’t) 16.45 Corporate Culture 17.00 Wrap up 17.30 End of day 18.00 Dinner at the Delikeet
  • 4. Introducing Trompenaars Hampden-Turner Connecting viewpoints Founded by Charles Hampden-Turner Peter Woolliams Fons Trompenaars Dilemma theory, Assessments and PhD Wharton scenario planning measurements
  • 5. Objectives During the next two days we aim to provide you: • To provide necessary information on the IAPOnline tool and process so that you are equipped to set up and use the tool with your participants. • To enable you to confidently and effectively integrate and use the IAP tool as part of your practice with clients. • A deeper understanding and background of 7Dimensions of culture model • A broad sense of how to use the IAP profile and supporting materials with your clients • A clear understanding of the features and practical logistics of using the IAP Online system
  • 6. Introductions • What you would like to share that you think is important for others to know about you? • One (or two) values instilled in you by your parents?
  • 7. Expectations • What do you hope to take away from this program? • How would you like to use what you learn in the next two days in your practice?
  • 8. Objectives for today Today we aim to provide you: • A deeper understanding and background of 7 Dimensions of culture model and Corporate Culture Model • Practice mapping cultural dimensions • Reflect on our own cultural orientations and how this impacts our work with others
  • 9. THT - locations Boston London Amsterdam Tokyo
  • 10. Intercultural Awareness Profiler (IAP): The tool The Intercultural Awareness Profiler (IAP): • assesses an individual’s orientation when resolving intercultural challenges • awareness of cultural differences • self-assessment, diagnostic tool The primary aim is to help managers structure their experiences in order to facilitate rapid personal development for doing business and managing in international business and/or diversity situations.
  • 11. THT 4-step approach to develop cultural competenceImpact Reconcile Resolve Cultural Differences Respect Appreciate Cultural Differences Recognize Increase Awareness Time
  • 12. Global Mindset: from Linear Thinking to Dimensional Inclusion From Linear Thinking (‘either-or’, ‘win- My Way 5,5 Your Way loose’, 1,10 10,1 or ‘water with the Compromise wine’) TO My Way Dimensional Thinking 1,10 10,10 (‘and-and’, Reconciliation ‘through-through’, ‘win-win’, ‘1+1=3’) Compromise 5,5 Denial Your Way 10,1
  • 13. THT 4-step approach to develop cultural competenceImpact Realize and Root Implement Reconciling Actions Reconcile Resolve Cultural Differences Respect Appreciate Cultural Differences Recognize Increase Awareness Time
  • 14. Where the IAP fits in THT approach to using the IAP Learn to Learn about Learn about work with myself others others Exercise Discussions 7D with IAP IAP Cases Roleplays Exercises Reflections
  • 15. About Culture Please define culture
  • 16. A model of culture Language Physical contact Food Work ethic Architecture Public Country emotion Music Pace of life Dress Sound Literature
  • 17. What is Culture? Explicit Culture Implicit Culture
  • 18. Culture Clash Culture A Culture B Implicit Culture Explicit Culture
  • 19. Intercultural adjustment We expect others to act like us, but they do not Hence, cultural incident occurs Causing a reaction (confusion, fear, anger, etc.) And we Or, become aware of our reaction Or, get drawn withdraw into a conflict We reflect on its cause Our initial reaction subsides We observe & interpret the situation again And develop a culturally appropriate response
  • 20. About Culture Culture is a shared systems of meanings and patterns of behavior. It is expressed in the solutions that people have chosen to solving human problems/dilemmas in the areas of : • Human Relationships • Time • External environment
  • 21. The Seven Dimensions of CultureHUMAN RELATIONSHIPS 1. ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS and PROCESSES Consistency Flexibility 2. GLOBAL TEAMWORK: the Individual and the Group Individual Group / Teamwork 3. INVOLVEMENT: How far do we get involved Analytical Synthesis ‘Text ‘ ‘Context’ 4. EMOTIONS: Feelings and Relationships Controlled Passionate 5. STATUS: How do we get/give status? Egalitarian/ Hierarchical/ Doing BeingTIME ORIENTATION 6. TIME: How do we manage it? Sequential / Synchronic / Linear ParallelNATURE and PLANNING 7. STRATEGY: How do we relate to our environment Push Pull
  • 22. Models - Mind Maps Models are like mental mind maps A mental mind map is just like any other map, it is only useful if it is relevant and helps you orient in the way that you need.
  • 23. Culture as a Normal Distribution US Culture French Culture Stereotype Stereotype
  • 24. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 How we deal with Time07 Internal versus External Control
  • 25. 01/ The Car AccidentWhat happens to your friend?
  • 26. 01/ What Right has Your Friend? A. My friend has a definite right as a friend to expect me to testify to the lower figure. B. He has some right as a friend to expect me to testify to the lower figure. C. He has no right as a friend to expect me to testify to the lower figure.
  • 27. 01/ Recognizing how values come to us Positives: -Consistency -Clarity -Reliability Universalism versus Particularism (Rules & Systems) (Exceptions & Relationship) Negatives: -Corruption -Chaos -Unreliability
  • 28. 01/ Recognizing how values come to us Positives: -Flexibility -Responsiveness -Personal Universalism versus Particularism (Rules & Systems) (Exceptions & Relationship) Negatives: -Bureaucracy -Rigid -Impersonal
  • 29. 01/ Respecting that all sides are within everyone Foreground Background Positives: Positives: -Consistency -Flexibility -Clarity - Responsiveness - Interpersonal -Reliability Universalism versus Particularism (Rules & Systems) (Exceptions & Relationship) Negatives: Negatives: -Bureaucracy -Corruption -Rigid -Chaos -Impersonal -Unreliability
  • 30. 01/ Respecting and reconcile values ‘Built to last’ Positives: Positives: -Consistency -Flexibility -Clarity -Responsiveness -Reliability -Interpersonal Universalism versus Particularism (Rules & Systems) (Exceptions & Relationship) Negatives: Negatives: -Bureaucracy -Corruption -Rigid -Chaos -Impersonal -Unreliability Unsustainable
  • 31. 01/ Universalism Friend has no/some right and would not help Switzerland 97 Canada 93 USA 93 Sweden 92United Kingdom 91 Australia 91 Netherlands 90 Germany 87 Czech Rep 83 France 73 Singapore 69 Japan 68 Mexico 64 India 54 China 47 Russia 44 Korea 37 Venezuela 32 0 20 40 60 80 100
  • 32. 01/ Universalism – Particularism Rules and regulations Exceptions • Demands clarity based on • Willing to be flexible based on standards relationship • Consistency • “It depends” • Uniform procedures • Pragmatic responses • Desire for structure • At ease with ambiguity • Letter of the Law • Spirit of the law – in context of relationship
  • 33. 01/ Universalism – Particularism Positive Connotation Consistency Flexibility Clarity Responsiveness Reliability Interpersonal Negative Connotation Bureaucracy Corruption Rigid Chaos Impersonal Unreliability Implications for business: • The meaning of a contract • Role of Headquarters • Negotiating process • Branding
  • 34. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 How we deal with Time07 Internal versus External Control
  • 35. 02/ Individualism versus Communitarianism One said: ‘It is obvious that if one has as much freedom as possible and the maximum opportunity to develop oneself, the quality of one’s life would improve as a result.’Another said: ‘If the individual is continuouslytaking care of his or her fellows then the quality oflife for us all will improve, even if it obstructsindividual freedom and individual development.’
  • 36. 02/ Individualism Percentage opting for individual freedom Israel 89 Canada 71 USA 69 Denmark 67Netherlands 65 Finland 64 Australia 63 UK 61 Sweden 61 Russia 60 Germany 53 Italy 52 Indonesia 44 Singapore 42 China 41 France 41 Japan 39 India 37 Mexico 32 Egypt 30 0 20 40 60 80 100
  • 37. 02/ Individualism - Communitarian Positive Connotation Personal Initiative Commitment Personal responsibility Cooperation Negative Connotation Egoism Conformism Anarchy Implications for business: • Decision Making • Reward Systems • Negotiating
  • 38. 02/ Individualism – Communitarianism ‘I’ culture ‘we’ culture Focus on the individual Focus on the group • Decide by voting •Decide by consensus • Pay for performance •Team rewards • Individual mandate •Group mandate • One representative •Delegation • Selection based on skill •Fitting the team
  • 39. 02/ Structure – How to Align Project Plans? German way Japanese way Plan Plan Time for preparation x3 Implement Implement Evaluate Improve Invest time in clarifying definitions and their meanings
  • 40. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Specific versus Diffuse05 Achievement versus Ascription06 How we deal with Time07 Internal versus External Control
  • 41. 03/ Specific versus DiffuseKurt Lewin: U and G life spaces PUBLIC PRIVATE
  • 42. 03/ Specific Personality PUBLIC Specific Relationship
  • 43. 03/ Diffuse Personality PUBLIC PRIVATE
  • 44. 03/ Relationship in diffuse cultures (Almost) No Relationship
  • 45. 03/ Relationship in diffuse cultures PRIVATE PRIVATE Deep connection
  • 46. 03/ Meeting between Diffuse versus Specific PUBLIC PRIVATE PRIVATE Danger Zone
  • 47. 03/ Specific - DiffuseAnalytic / Differentiated Holistic / Integrated• Text • Context• Task • Relationship• Easy contact • Slower personal involvement• Open and direct communication • Polite and implicit communication• Analyzing, segmenting • Connecting issues• Letter of contract • Spirit of contract• Hard selling • Client relationship• Shareholders • Stake holders
  • 48. 03/ Specific: Minimize distance
  • 49. 03/ Diffuse: Maintain distance
  • 50. 03/ Direct and Indirect Communication Specific, reduced context Diffuse, larger context (moving from specific to general) (moving from general to specific)
  • 51. 03/ High and Low Context Communication Chinese languages High Context Japanese Arabic All meaning is not conveyed Indian Languages in the language Greek Spanish Italian English Most meaning French is expressed by the specific American words Scandinavian Languages Low Context German / Swiss Dutch
  • 52. Exercise Communication Tools • Create a list on a flip chart of the various communication tools (e.g. email, conference call, etc). • Order them from low context to high context • Indicate the situations to use these tools when working with either Specific cultures and Diffuse cultures.
  • 53. Technology – Choices and their Impact Context-Poor Context-Rich Most suitable for High Participative discussion and debate Reaching agreement and understanding Level of rapport Level of rapport Discussing sensitive issues Most suitable for Factual information sharing Exchange of data Clarification or summarizing meeting results Fax, Email Teleconferencing Face-to-Face meetings Low Groupware Phone calls Videoconferencing Source: adapted from Globally speaking, Video Two..
  • 54. 03/ SpecificityA boss asking to paint his houseThe colleague argues:You don’t have to paint the house if you don’t feel like it. He is your boss in thecompany. Outside the company, he has little authority. The subordinate argues: Despite the fact that I don’t feel like it, I will paint the house anyway. He is my boss and you cannot ignore it outside your work either.
  • 55. 04/ Specificity Would not paint the house Sweden 91Netherlands %91 Denmark 89 UK 88 Canada 87 USA 82 Australia 78 Japan 71 Mexico 70 Thailand 69 Greece 67 Belgium 66 Korea 65 Singapore 58 Venezuela 52 Kuwait 47 Nigeria 46 China 32 0 20 40 60 80 100
  • 56. 04/ Specific - Diffuse Positive Connotation Easy contact Personal involvement Task oriented Commitment Negative Connotation Superficial Evasive Blunt Indirect Implications for business: • Management Style • Communication • Giving feedback • The concept of ‘face’
  • 57. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Neutral versus Affective04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 Sequential versus Synchronic07 Internal versus External Control
  • 58. 04/ Neutral– Affective ‘Controlled’ emotions Show emotions openly • Detached • Engaged • Not speaking up • Speaking up • Monotonous • Raising your voice • Let someone finish speaking • Interrupting • Keep a (physical) distance • Touching each other
  • 59. 04/ Tone of Voice Tone of voice Riding the Waves of Culture F. Trompenaars / C. Hampden - Turner
  • 60. 04/ Pace of voice Anglo-Saxon A ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ B ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ Southern Europe A ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ B ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Asian A ___ ___ B ___ ___
  • 61. Email Dear Ms Hermsen, It was a pleasure to speak with you over the phone the other day. ☺ COULD YOU SEND US YOUR REQUEST THIS WEEK. The deadline is 18 November 2010. Without recieving your list, we will not be able to provide you the parts you need!!!!! Have a fantastic day!! Wendy
  • 62. 04/ Neutral - Affective Positive Connotation Reasonable Engaged In control Spontaneous Negative Connotation ‘Cold’ ‘Hysterical’ Detached Over-reacting Evasive Unmanageable Implications for business: • Interpretation of emotions and humor • Effective intercultural communication, feedback • Product design
  • 63. 04/ What is your preference? In pairs discuss: • When working as a presenter/coach/trainer when do feel that people are listening to you? • What reactions from your audience makes you comfortable or uncomfortable, appreciated or not appreciated? • How do you behave when you feel angry or frustrated with your audience, team, colleagues? • As a listener, how do you show you are paying attention? Have you had situations where people have opened up or closed down using this approach? • Is your experience different across cultures? • Do you consciously change your style for different audiences? If so, when?
  • 64. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 How we deal with Time07 Internal versus External Control
  • 65. 05/ Achievement versus Ascription What You Do Who You Are STATUS ?
  • 66. 05/ How Status is Accorded Achievement Ascription What You Do Who you are • Achievement • Family background • Age • Performance • Gender • Education • Position
  • 67. 05/ Achievement versus Ascription Do you agree with this statement? “The most important thing in life is to act as really suits you, even if you don’t get things done.”
  • 68. 05/ Achievement versus Ascription Percentage not agreeing with acting as really suits you USA 76 % Australia 69 Canada 65 UK 56 Sweden 54 Denmark 49 Germany 40 Switzerland 34 France 33 Hong Kong 32 Mexico 31 Russia 30 China 28 Japan 26 Poland 21 Korea 20Czech Republic 13 Argentina 12 Egypt 4 0 20 40 60 80 100
  • 69. 05/ Achievement-Ascription DOING BEING Status based on performance Status based on who you are: (age, gender, family, education) • More egalitarian structure • More hierarchical structure • Short-term contract • Job on recommendation • Budget based on last year’s • Budget based on past achievements • Fixed salary with regular rises • Bonuses • Promotion based on reputation • Promotion based on bottom line or seniority contribution
  • 70. 05/ Achievement-Ascription Positive Connotation Top performing individuals Predictability and stability Pushing for next performance Negative Connotation Past performance doesn’t count Status quo not challenged No time for learning Rigidity and steep hierarchy Nepotism Implications for business: • Recruitment • Affirmative Action program • Negotiating
  • 71. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 How we deal with Time07 Internal versus External Control
  • 72. “”On XXXX training, we aim to impress on trainees theimportance of punctuality in the company x corporateculture. Therefore, we expect trainees to be on time,every time, seated and prepared to learn at the timesagreed. This includes morning (08.00) and after-lunch(14.00) start times as well as after breaks in between.If you agree with trainees on a 7-, 10-, 12- or 15-minute break, please make clear the precise timeagreed on for resumption of class, and shut theclassroom door when that time has passed. Traineesthat do not stick to agreed times will be noted by theClass Manager.”
  • 73. 06/ Time OrientationPast, Present and Future • Past-orientation: respect for ancestors, traditions, collective historical experiences. • Present-orientation: day-by-day experience directs people’s life, focus on doing and action. • Future-orientation: activities are directed toward future prospects, focus on planning.
  • 74. 06/ Time OrientationPast, Present and Future USA FRA JPN SPA GER CAN
  • 75. Time Circles • In pairs, draw your own circles. • What implications does your orientation have for your work with your clients? • Do you see a difference working with different industries in how they relate to time? Between government and corporate?
  • 76. 06/ Past - Present - Future Positive Connotation Proven worth In the moment Trend setter Up-to-date Earlier Adopter Negative Connotation Passé In a rut Dreamer Lack of strategy Implications for business: • Marketing /Sales pitches • Program /product positing • Communication
  • 77. 06/ Sequential versus Synchronic Sequential (linear) Synchronic (in parallel) •One activity at a time • Parallel activities •Cut time in pieces • Cyclical time • Universalistic time •Subjective time • Situations are subject to • More paths to the goal planning
  • 78. 06/ Sequential versus SynchronicSequential versus Synchronic 1.45 Sequential 3.00 Synchronic 1.45 - 2.00 3.00 - 3.15
  • 79. 06/ Sequential versus Synchronic Efficient Positive Connotation Effective Punctual Flexible Predictable Good improvisation Negative Connotation Rigid Lack of punctuality Stressed about time Unreliable about deadlines Implications for business: • The meaning of appointments • Meetings • Project and business planning • Speed & different priorities
  • 80. 01 Universalism versus Particularism02 Individualism versus Communitarianism03 Specific versus Diffuse04 Neutral versus Affective05 Achievement versus Ascription06 Sequential versus Synchronic07 Internal versus External Control
  • 81. 07/ Internal versus External Control External Control Subjugation to natureInternal ControlDominance over nature
  • 82. 07/ Internal versus External Control a) When I make plans, I am almost certain that I can make them work. b) It is not always wise to plan too far ahead because many things turn out to be a matter of good or bad fortune.
  • 83. 07/ Internal versus External Control What happens to me is my own doing Israel 88 Norway 86 USA 82 UK 77 France 76 NL 75 Belgium 75 Italy 72 Korea 72 Germany 66 Japan 63 India 63Czech Republic 59 Singapore 57 Kuwait 55 Russia 49 China 39 Venezuela 33 0 20 40 60 80 100
  • 84. 07/ Interal - External• Focus on self & in control • Focus on ‘others’ & anticipate• Internal push ‘drive to make it • External pull happen’ • Comfort with waves and shifts• Discomfort with ‘out of control’ • Acting with environment &• Dominance & ‘aggressiveness’ responsiveness• Planning and control • Options and scenario’s• Preventive maintenance • Trouble shooting• Sticking to what you planned • Going ‘with the flow’
  • 85. 07/ Internal - External Positive Connotation ‘Go getter’ Goes with the flow Drive and ambition Harmony Negative Connotation Aggressive Weak backbone “not invented here” syndrome Fate as an excuse Implications for business: • Strategy to product development • Planning for the future • Dealing with hardware, processes
  • 86. Case study The Forecasting Scenario.• You are a consultant for a US-based company in information technology "Go For IT" (GFI) and represent Scenario Inc. a consulting company that specializes in producing scenarios as an important part of the strategic planning process. For many years GFI had gained impressive competitive advantage by producing in their strategy group an official forecast for the near term prospects of the global company. A few years ago, owing to a very high uncertainty and volatility, the process of sophisticated, well-researched forecasting was introduced with incredible success. Market share rose by 20% each year since.• Your company is trying to get GFI to adopt the process of SOD, Scenario Option Development. This process consists scanning the environment for trends which might culminate in three to four alternative future scenarios, each of which GFI must survive and prosper therein. When I made the presentation of the difference between scenarios and forecasting, an American manager of GFI quite bluntly stated:• "I dont understand. You are trying to replace our successful process of forecasting that was based on our best guess about what will happen next. On top of that we have shown to be able to make it happen. We believe in the "willed future". And you are suggesting that we imagine 3 or 4 "alternative futures" and prepares ourselves to go along with these and adapt to them. I see it as an invitation to loss of focus".
  • 87. Summary - The Seven Dimensions of CultureHUMAN RELATIONSHIPS 1. ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS and PROCESSES Consistency Flexibility 2. GLOBAL TEAMWORK: the Individual and the Group Individual Group / Teamwork 3. INVOLVEMENT: How far do we get involved Analytical Synthesis ‘Text ‘ ‘Context’ 4. EMOTIONS: Feelings and Relationships Controlled Passionate 5. STATUS: How do we get/give status? Egalitarian/ Hierarchical/ Doing BeingTIME ORIENTATION 6. TIME: How do we manage it? Sequential / Synchronic / Linear ParallelNATURE and PLANNING 7. STRATEGY: How do we relate to our environment Push Pull
  • 88. Values instilled by my parents • Lets go back to the values we listed in the beginning of the morning. • Do you see any links between the values which we wrote down and the 7 dimensions of culture orientations?
  • 89. Exercise: Discovering Another Person’s Cultural Map • In groups of 4, create a list of things you can say or do, when begining a relationship with another person, which could help you discover that other person’s primary cultural orientation. (see Discovering Another Persons’ Cultural Map handout) • Individually, make a personal copy of the liste created by your group for future reference (and the next activity)
  • 90. Exercise: Mapping Cultural Dimensions • Pick a partner from your group to form a team of two. • Each team of two picks a team of two from the other group and go and sit with them. • Please don’t start your interactions until you get the next instructions – don’t even introduce yourself • To start, one person from each team will speak and interact, the other two will observe. • Using the methods from the list you created in your separate groups, and see if you can get an idea of the other persons orienation... • Observers look at what works well and what not • Switch.
  • 91. Corporate Culture • Organizational culture is shaped not only by technologies and markets, but by the cultural preferences of leaders and employees.
  • 92. Corporate Culture Egalitarian Incubator Guided missile ORG. CHAOS STRATEGY MBPassion MBObjectives LEARNING PAY FOR PERFORMANCE Person oriented Task oriented NETWORK STRUCTURE Hierarchical MBSubjectives MBJobDescription PROMOTION/ EXPERTISE POWER Family Eiffel tower
  • 93. National patterns of corporate culture Egalitarian Denmark Norway Switzerland USA Sweden the Netherlands Canada UK Finland Person Task Belgium Hungary Australia Italy Greece Venezuela France Israel Germany Nigeria China South Korea Hierarchical
  • 94. Summary - what culture has taught us… • Cultural preferences are like mirror images of each other • What comes first in importance for one culture, comes second in another • We are comfortable when others acknowledge and act on what is important to us. When we are under pressure, we are less likely to ‘reason’ outside of our comfort zone. • We can only respect others (‘points of view) when we are able to reasonably understand them. • We require a new (assessment) logic to learn from both sides.