Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne University of Massachusetts at Amherst   slides by Travis Langley Henderson Stat...
Anxiety Disorders Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 5
The Nature of Anxiety Disorders   <ul><li>Fear  is an innate alarm response to a dangerous or life-threatening situation. ...
Panic Disorder   <ul><li>Frequent and Recurrent Panic Attacks </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permis...
Panic Disorder <ul><li>Panic disorder is often associated with  agoraphobia. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Compani...
Panic Disorder <ul><li>Neurotransmitters </li></ul><ul><li>Anxiety Sensitivity </li></ul><ul><li>Conditioned Fear Reaction...
Panic Disorder <ul><li>Benzodiazepines </li></ul><ul><li>Antidepressants </li></ul><ul><li>Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors <...
Specific Phobias <ul><li>Specific Phobia: </li></ul><ul><li>An irrational and unabating fear of a particular object, activ...
Specific Phobias Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Examples Hem...
Specific Phobias Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Some Less Co...
Specific Phobias <ul><li>Systematic Desensitization </li></ul><ul><li>Flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Imaginal Flooding </li></...
<ul><li>Virtual reality software is sometimes used to treat people with phobias such as fear of heights or flying. </li></...
Social Phobia <ul><li>A  social phobia  involves a fear in virtually all social situations. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGr...
Social Phobia <ul><li>In Vivo  Exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive Restructuring </li></ul><ul><li>Social Skills Training...
Generalized Anxiety Disorder   <ul><li>Generalized Anxiety Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder characterized b...
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder   <ul><li>Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder characterized...
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder   <ul><li>Obsession :  </li></ul><ul><li>A persistent and intrusive idea, thought, impulse, ...
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder   <ul><li>Obsessions associated with checking compulsions. </li></ul><ul><li>Need for symmet...
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder <ul><li>So far, treatment with clomipramine or other serotonin reuptake inhibiting medicatio...
TRAUMA Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Acute Stress Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder that develops during the mon...
Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Intrusions and Avoidance </li></ul><ul><li>Hyperarousal and Numbing </li></ul>Copyright ©...
Perspectives on Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Brain Changes </li></ul><ul><li>Conditioned Fear </li></ul><ul><li>Econom...
Treatment of Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Medication </li></ul><ul><li>“ Covering” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Uncovering” </l...
Anxiety Disorders: The Biopsychosocial Perspective <ul><li>These disorders intermingle biological, psychological, and soci...
<ul><li>For more information on material covered in this chapter, visit our Web site:  </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hi...
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Halgin6e ppt ch05

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  • Anxiety disorders are characterized by the experience of physiological arousal, apprehension or feelings of dread, hypervigilance, avoidance, and sometimes a specific fear or phobia.
  • People with panic disorder experience frequent and recurrent panic attacks , periods of intense fear and physical discomfort, in which they feel overwhelmed and terrified by a range of bodily sensations that causes them to feel they are losing control. For panic disorder to be diagnosed in an individual, at least some of the person’s panic attacks must arise “out of the blue,” meaning that there is no situational cue or trigger. Such an attack is called an unexpected (uncued) panic attack . Situationally bound (or cued) panic attacks: An individual may experience a panic attack immediately following exposure to a specific stimulus or cue in the environment. When the person has a tendency to have a panic attack in a particular situation but does not have one every time, the episode is referred to as a situationally predisposed panic attack .
  • Although panic disorder is usually linked to agoraphobia, it is possible to experience agoraphobia without panic disorder, or panic disorder without agoraphobia.
  • One set of biological theories focuses on abnormalities in the levels of particular neurotransmitters . According to one such view, people with panic disorder have an excess of norepinephrine or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. According to anxiety sensitivity theory , people with panic disorder tend to interpret cognitive and somatic manifestations of stress and anxiety in a catastrophic manner causing the individual to hyperventilate. If this increase in the rate of breathing fails to lower blood levels of carbon dioxide, the individual is thrown into a panic attack (Klein, 1993). Conditioned fear reactions : The individual associates certain bodily sensations with memories of the last panic attack, causing a full-blown panic attack to develop even before measurable biological changes have occurred.
  • The most effective antianxiety medications are benzodiazepines . Because these medications often lose their therapeutic efficacy and lead to physiological or psychological dependence, clinicians have sought alternatives, including antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine (Prozac). Relaxation training : The client learns to systematically alternate tensing and relaxing muscles all over the body. Panic control therapy (PCT) consists of cognitive restructuring, the development of an awareness of bodily cues associated with panic attacks and breathing retraining.
  • Everyone has fears about or unpleasant responses to certain objects, situations, or creatures. Such responses of discomfort or dislike, called aversions , are common and are not considered phobias. However, if a person’s response to one of these experiences is far out of proportion to the danger of threat posed by the stimulus, the person is considered to have a phobia.
  • Some phobias -- such as animal phobias, blood injury phobias, claustrophobia, and dental phobias -- can be traced back to childhood. The primary biological perspectives on specific phobias involve the notion that humans are essentially preprogrammed to fear certain situations or stimuli that could threaten our survival.
  • Systematic desensitization rests on the premise that an individual can best overcome maladaptive anxiety by approaching feared stimuli gradually, while in a relaxed state. In a behavioral technique called flooding , the client is totally immersed in the sensation of anxiety. In imaginal flooding , the client listens to someone read several vivid descriptions. In the graduated exposure method, clients initially confront situations that cause only minor anxiety and then gradually progress toward those that cause greater anxiety. In thought stopping , the individual learns to stop anxiety-provoking thoughts.
  • Many people become nervous when speaking or performing in front of others. People with social phobia , however, feel tremendous anxiety not only in these situations but also in virtually all situations where others might observe them. The primary characteristic of social phobia is an irrational, intense fear that one’s behavior in a public situation will be mocked or criticized by others. People with social phobia recognize that their fears are unreasonable, yet they cannot stop themselves from worrying that others are scrutinizing them. In addition to their fears about appearing foolish or clumsy, people with social phobia have low self-esteem and underestimate their actual talents and areas of competence.
  • Theories regarding the causes of social phobia are still preliminary, and some are quite speculative. Psychological perspectives on social phobia revolve around understanding the individual’s thought processes. Behavioral methods that provide in vivo exposure, along with cognitive restructuring and social skills training, seem to be the most effective in helping people with social phobia. Social skills training helps social phobics learn methods for coping with interpersonal stress, so they can feel more confident and comfortable in their interactions. Medication is the treatment recommended within the biological perspective for severe cases of this disorder. However, cognitive-behavioral techniques are also recommended even when medication is appropriate.
  • People who are diagnosed as having generalized anxiety disorder have a number of unrealistic worries that spread to various spheres of life. From a biological perspective, it is suggested that people with generalized anxiety disorder have a biological abnormality similar to that proposed to account for other anxiety disorders involving abnormalities of GABA, serotogenic, and nonadrenergenic systems. Treatment from this perspective emphasizes medication. The cognitive-behavioral approach to generalized anxiety disorder emphasizes the unrealistic nature of these worries and regards the disorder as a vicious cycle that feeds on itself. Cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches recommend breaking the negative cycle of worry by teaching individuals techniques that allow them to feel they control the worrying.
  • Unlike obsessions, which cause anxiety, compulsions are carried out in an effort to reduce anxiety or stress.
  • People with OCD are seen as having thoughts and actions that they literally cannot inhibit, as though the brain structures involved in this process are, in essence, “working overtime” to try to control them.
  • Other disorders involving abnormal serotonin levels are also thought to be related to obsessive-compulsive disorder along a continuum or spectrum, which includes a wide range of disorders involving dissociation, somatization, hypochondriasis, eating disorders, pathological gambling, borderline personality disorder, and disorders that involve uncontrollable impulses, such as hair pulling, face picking, compulsive shopping, and gambling. Treatment with medications, such as clomipramine , seems to be effective, although cognitive behavioral methods involving exposure and thought stopping are quite effective as well.
  • A traumatic experience is a disastrous or extremely painful event that has severe psychological and physiological effects. Aftereffects of the traumatic event can include flashbacks, nightmares, and intrusive thoughts that alternate with the individual&apos;s attempts to deny that the event ever took place.
  • Some people develop an acute stress disorder soon after a traumatic event. In this condition, the individual develops intense fear, helplessness, or horror during the month after trauma. Despite the extreme nature of acute stress disorder, most people are able to return to relatively normal functioning within days or weeks. People with this disorder may reexperience the event and desperately avoid reminders of the trauma. These symptoms arise within the month following the trauma and last from days to weeks.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is appropriate when the symptoms persist for more than a month. The symptoms of PSTD seem to fall into two related clusters. The first, called “ intrusions and avoidance ,” includes intrusive thoughts, recurrent dreams, flashbacks, hyperactivity to cues of the trauma, and the avoidance of thoughts or reminders. The second cluster, “ hyperarousal and numbing ,” includes symptoms that involve detachment, a loss of interest in everyday activities, sleep disturbance, irritability, and a sense of foreshortened future.
  • It seems that even the structure of the brain can change as a result of trauma; for example, researchers have noted that women with PTSD who had been victimized in childhood show brain changed similar to those of combat veterans—namely, a reduction in the size of the hippocampus. According to classical behavioral approaches, it is assumed that the person with PTSD has acquired a conditioned fear to the stimuli that were present at the time of the trauma. In assessing the role of sociocultural factors in the determination of PSTD, investigators have been particularly interested in the ways that disadvantaged economic settings may set the stage for increased vulnerability.
  • Within the biological perspective, clinical investigators have reported the successful treatment of PSTD symptoms with a variety of medications, with the choice relying primarily with the client’s particular symptoms. Treatment may involve teaching people with PTSD new coping skills, so that they can more effectively manage stress and reestablish social ties with others who can provide ongoing support. A combination of &amp;quot;covering&amp;quot; techniques and “uncovering” techniques may be helpful . “ Covering” techniques , such as supportive therapy and stress management, help the client seal over the pain of the trauma. “ Uncovering” techniques , which involve a reliving of the trauma, include the behavioral treatments of imaginal flooding and systematic desensitization.
  • Halgin6e ppt ch05

    1. 1. Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne University of Massachusetts at Amherst slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Abnormal Psychology Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 5e Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 6e Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    2. 2. Anxiety Disorders Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 5
    3. 3. The Nature of Anxiety Disorders <ul><li>Fear is an innate alarm response to a dangerous or life-threatening situation. </li></ul><ul><li>Anxiety is the state in which an individual is inordinately apprehensive, tense, and uneasy about the prospect of something terrible happening. </li></ul><ul><li>People with anxiety disorders are incapacitated by chronic and intense feelings of anxiety. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    4. 4. Panic Disorder <ul><li>Frequent and Recurrent Panic Attacks </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Constant Worry and Apprehension About Possible Panic Attacks or <ul><li>Unexpected (Uncued) Attacks </li></ul><ul><li>Situationally Bound (Cued) Attack </li></ul><ul><li>Situationally Predisposed Attack </li></ul>
    5. 5. Panic Disorder <ul><li>Panic disorder is often associated with agoraphobia. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Agoraphobia: Intense anxiety about being trapped or stranded in a situation without help if a panic attack occurs.
    6. 6. Panic Disorder <ul><li>Neurotransmitters </li></ul><ul><li>Anxiety Sensitivity </li></ul><ul><li>Conditioned Fear Reactions </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Suggested explanations include: Biological relatives of people with panic disorder are 8 times more likely to develop this condition.
    7. 7. Panic Disorder <ul><li>Benzodiazepines </li></ul><ul><li>Antidepressants </li></ul><ul><li>Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors </li></ul><ul><li>Relaxation Training </li></ul><ul><li>Panic Control Therapy (PCT) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Treatments
    8. 8. Specific Phobias <ul><li>Specific Phobia: </li></ul><ul><li>An irrational and unabating fear of a particular object, activity, or situation that provokes an immediate anxiety response, disrupts functioning, and results in avoidance behavior. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    9. 9. Specific Phobias Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Examples Hematophobia Blood Ephidophobia Snakes Claustrophobia Closed spaces Acrophobia Heights Aerophobia Flying Death-related phobia Funerals, corpses, and cemeteries
    10. 10. Specific Phobias Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Some Less Common Phobias Ailurophobia Cats Chionophobia Snow Erythrophobia The color red Metallophobia Metals Ponophobia Work Triskaidekaphobia The number 13
    11. 11. Specific Phobias <ul><li>Systematic Desensitization </li></ul><ul><li>Flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Imaginal Flooding </li></ul><ul><li>Graduated Exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Thought Stopping </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Treatments
    12. 12. <ul><li>Virtual reality software is sometimes used to treat people with phobias such as fear of heights or flying. </li></ul>Specific Phobias Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    13. 13. Social Phobia <ul><li>A social phobia involves a fear in virtually all social situations. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>People with social phobia: </li></ul><ul><li>recognize their own fears as unreasonable </li></ul><ul><li>show low self-esteem </li></ul><ul><li>underestimate their own abilities </li></ul><ul><li>ruminate about how they could have </li></ul><ul><li>acted differently in a social event. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Social Phobia <ul><li>In Vivo Exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive Restructuring </li></ul><ul><li>Social Skills Training </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes Medication </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Treatments
    15. 15. Generalized Anxiety Disorder <ul><li>Generalized Anxiety Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder characterized by anxiety that is not associated with a particular object, situation, or event, but seems to be a constant feature of a person's day-to-day existence. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    16. 16. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder <ul><li>Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent obsessions or compulsions that are inordinately time-consuming or that cause significant distress or impairment. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    17. 17. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder <ul><li>Obsession : </li></ul><ul><li>A persistent and intrusive idea, thought, impulse, or image. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Compulsion : A repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior performed in response to uncontrollable urges or according to a ritualistic or stereotyped set of rules.
    18. 18. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder <ul><li>Obsessions associated with checking compulsions. </li></ul><ul><li>Need for symmetry and order. </li></ul><ul><li>Obsessions about cleanliness associated with washing compulsions. </li></ul><ul><li>Hoarding-related behaviors. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. 4 Major Dimensions
    19. 19. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder <ul><li>So far, treatment with clomipramine or other serotonin reuptake inhibiting medications, such a fluoxetine (Prozac), is the most effective biological treatment available for OCD. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. OCD is increasingly being understood as a genetic disorder.
    20. 20. TRAUMA Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    21. 21. Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Acute Stress Disorder: </li></ul><ul><li>An anxiety disorder that develops during the month after a traumatic event. Lasts 2-4 weeks. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Symptoms may include depersonalization, numbing, dissociative amnesia, intense anxiety, hypervigilance, and impairment of everyday functioning.
    22. 22. Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Intrusions and Avoidance </li></ul><ul><li>Hyperarousal and Numbing </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Symptoms fall into two related clusters: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: More than a month after a traumatic event, stress interferes with the individual’s ability to function.
    23. 23. Perspectives on Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Brain Changes </li></ul><ul><li>Conditioned Fear </li></ul><ul><li>Economic Disadvantage </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    24. 24. Treatment of Trauma-Induced Disorders <ul><li>Medication </li></ul><ul><li>“ Covering” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Uncovering” </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    25. 25. Anxiety Disorders: The Biopsychosocial Perspective <ul><li>These disorders intermingle biological, psychological, and sociocultural phenomena. </li></ul><ul><li>Relatively straightforward behaviorally based treatments can alleviate symptoms. </li></ul><ul><li>Other strategies can enhance effectiveness of behavioral techniques: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>cognitive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>insight-oriented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>psychopharmacological </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    26. 26. <ul><li>For more information on material covered in this chapter, visit our Web site: </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. http:/ www.mhhe.com/halgin6e

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