Halgin6e ppt ch04

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  • Issues: What is the underlying model of human nature on which the perspective is based? How does the perspective explain human behavior? What are the perspective's implications for research? What treatment approaches would follow from the perspective, and how well do these treatments work?
  • The psychodynamic perspective is a theoretical orientation that emphasizes unconscious determinants of behavior and is derived from Freud's psychoanalytic approach.
  • Personality Structure: id, ego, superego The term psychodynamics is used to describe interaction among the id, the ego, and the superego. In Freudian theory, the ID is the instinctive, inborn part of personality. PRIMARY PROCESS THINKING is the id's loosely associated, idiosyncratic, and distorted cognitive representation of the world. The id follows the PLEASURE PRINCIPLE , a motivating force oriented toward the immediate and total gratification of sensual needs and desires.
  • SECONDARY PROCESS THINKING is represented by the logical and rational problem solving which characterizes the ego. Freud described the ego as being governed by the REALITY PRINCIPLE which leads the individual to confront the constraints of the external world. In Freud's theory, the ego has no motivating force of its own. All of the ego's energy is derived from the energy of the id, a pressure for gratification that Freud called the LIBIDO .
  • The superego also serves an inspirational function. It includes the EGO IDEAL which is the individual's model of how the perfect person should be.
  • Defense Mechanisms: Freud felt that repression is the most powerful, pushing impulses of the id out of awareness.
  • According to psychodynamic theorists, people use defense mechanisms to keep unacceptable thoughts, instincts, and feelings out of conscious awareness. Humor: Emphasizing the amusing aspects of a conflict or stressful situation Self-assertion: Dealing with difficult situations by directly expressing feelings and thoughts to others. Suppression: Avoiding thoughts about disturbing issues .
  • Devaluation: Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by attributing negative qualities to oneself or others . Idealization: Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by attributing exaggerated positive qualities to others . Omnipotence : Responding to stress by acting superior to others . Denial : Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by refusing to acknowledge a painful aspect of reality or experience that would be apparent to others. Projection : Attributing one’s own undesirable personal traits or feelings to someone else. Rationalization: Concealing true motivations for thoughts, actions, or feelings by offering reassuring or self-serving but incorrect explanations . Displacement: Shifting unacceptable feelings or impulses from the target of those feelings to someone less threatening or to an object . Dissociation: Fragmenting of the usually integrated cognitive, perceptual, and motor processes in a person's functioning . Intellectualization: Excessive abstract thinking in response to issues that cause conflict . Reaction formation: Transforming an unacceptable feeling or desire into its opposite in order to make it more acceptable . Repression : Unconsciously expelling disturbing wishes, thoughts, experiences from conscious awareness. Acting out: Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by actions rather than thoughts or feelings. Passive aggression: Presenting a facade of overcompliance to mask hidden resistance, anger, or resentment. Regression: Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by reverting to childish behaviors. Delusional projection: Delusionally attributing undesirable personal traits or feelings to someone else to protect one's ego from acknowledging distasteful personal attributes. Psychotic distortion: Dealing with emotional conflict or stress by resorting to delusional misinterpretation.
  • Freud proposed that there is a normal sequence of development through a series of what he called psychosexual stages , with each stage focusing on a different sexually excitable zone of the body . The ORAL STAGE (0-18 months): The main source of pleasure for the infant is stimulation of the mouth and lips.  The ANAL STAGE (18 months-3 years): The toddler's sexual energy focuses on stimulation in the anal area from holding onto and expelling feces. In the PHALLIC STAGE (3-5 years): The genital area of the body is the focus of the child's sexual feelings. During the phallic stage, the child becomes sexually attracted to the opposite sex parent. Freud (1913) called this scenario in boys the Oedipus complex. The parallel process in girls is called the Electra complex . According to Freud, following the turmoil of the Oedipus complex, the child's sexual energies recede entirely during LATENCY (5-12 years). In the GENITAL STAGE (12 years through adulthood): The adolescent must learn to transfer feelings of sexual attraction from the parent figure to opposite-sex peers. In FIXATION , the individual remains at a stage of psychosexual development characteristic of childhood.
  • Post-Freudian theorists, such as Jung, Adler, Homey, and Erikson departed from Freudian theory, contending that Freud overemphasized sexual and aggressive instincts. According to Carl Jung (1875-1961), the deepest layer of the unconscious includes images common to all human experience which he called archetypes . Alfred Adler (1870-1937) and Karen Horney (1885-1952) made important contributions to psychodynamic theory in their emphasis on the ego and the self-concept. Erik Erikson (1902-1994) proposed that personality development proceeds throughout the lifespan in a series of eight "crises.” Depending on how each is resolved, the individual's ego can acquire a new "strength" unique to that crisis stage. Crisis resolutions have a cumulative effect--if one stage is unfavorably resolved, it becomes more likely that succeeding stages will also be unfavorably resolved.
  • Ainsworth (1913-1999) and her associates developed characteristics of infants according to ATTACHMENT STYLE , or the way of relating to a caregiver figure. People are classified into one of three attachment styles: secure, ambivalent (or preoccupied), and avoidant (which includes fearful and dismissive). People with a secure attachment style find it easy to relate to others in close relationships and are comfortable with emotional interdependencies. Ambivalent, or preoccupied , individuals seek closeness with others but worry that others will not value them. Dismissive individuals have little interest in emotional relationships.
  • At the core of the humanistic perspective is the belief that human motivation is based on an inherent tendency to strive for self-fulfillment and meaning in life, notions that were rooted in existential psychology. Carl Rogers' person-centered theory focuses on the uniqueness of each individual, the importance of allowing each individual to achieve maximum fulfillment of potential, and the need for the individual to confront honestly the reality of his or her experiences in the world. Carl Rogers (1902-1987) said that a well-adjusted person's self-image should match, or have congruence with, the person's experiences. Parents may set up what Rogers referred to as conditions of worth in which the child receives love only when he or she fulfills certain demands.
  • Maslow's self-actualization theory focuses on the maximum realization of the individual's potential for psychological growth. Maslow's theory is best known, perhaps, for its pyramid-like structure which he called the hierarchy of needs . The basic premise of the hierarchy is that, for people to achieve a state of self-actualization, they must have satisfied a variety of more basic physical and psychological needs. Like Rogers, Maslow (1971) defined psychological disorder in terms of the degree of deviation from an ideal state and had similar views about the conditions that hamper self-actualization.
  • In client-centered therapy , Rogers recommended that therapists treat clients with unconditional positive regard and empathy, while providing a model of genuineness and willingness to self-disclose. Rogers focused on the extent to which a person experiences incongruence between the "actual self" and the "ideal self." Lacking in humanistic research are some of the fundamental requirements for a scientific approach such as using appropriate control groups.
  • Intergenerational approach emphasizes how parents' experiences in their own families of origin affect their interactions with their children. Structural approach assumes that, in normal families, parents and children have distinct roles, and there are boundaries between the generations. Strategic approach focuses on the resolution of family problems. Experiential approach emphasizes the unconscious and emotional processes.
  • Psychological disturbance can also arise as a result of discrimination associated with such attributes as gender, race, or age, or of pressures associated with economic hardships. People can also be adversely affected by general social forces such as fluid and inconsistent values in a society and destructive historical events such a political revolution, natural disaster, or nationwide depression. Treatments within the sociocultural perspective are determined by the nature of the group involved. In family therapy , family members are encouraged to try new ways of relating to each other and thinking about their problems. In group therapy , people share their stories and experiences with other, similar people. Multicultural approach : Skills involve culture-specific therapy techniques that are responsive to the unique characteristics of the clients. Milieu therapy provides a context in which the intervention is the environment, rather than the individual, usually consisting of staff and clients in a therapeutic community.
  • According to the behavioral perspective , abnormality is caused by faulty learning experiences . Behaviorists contend that emotional reactions are acquired through classical conditioning in which we associate a reflexive response with an unrelated stimulus. Stimulus generalization takes place when a person responds in the same way to stimuli that have some common properties. Differentiating between two stimuli that possess similar but essentially different characteristics is called stimulus discrimination. Aversive conditioning: an aversive or a painful stimulus paired with an initially neutral stimulus.
  • Operant conditioning , with Skinner's emphasis on reinforcement , involves the learning of behaviors that are not automatic. Operant conditioning is a learning process in which an individual acquires a set of behaviors through reinforcement. B. F. Skinner was the originator of operant conditioning. Reinforcers that satisfy a biological need are primary reinforcers .  Secondary reinforcers derive their value from association with primary reinforcers. Money is a good example of a secondary reinforcer. Positive reinforcement: a person repeats a behavior that leads to a reward. The removal of an unpleasant stimulus is called negative reinforcement .  Punishment involves applying an aversive stimulus, such as scolding, which is intended to reduce the frequency of the behavior that preceded the punishment. EXTINCTION is the cessation of behavior in the absence of reinforcement.  SHAPING is the process of reinforcing increasingly complex behaviors that come to resemble a desired outcome.
  • The process of acquiring new responses by observing and imitating the behavior of others, called modeling , has been studied by social learning theorists. According to social learning theorist Albert Bandura , when you watch someone else being reinforced for a behavior, you receive vicarious reinforcement. Bandura is also known for his work on self-efficacy , the individual’s perception of competence in various life situations.
  • One method that is particularly useful in treating irrational fear is based on counterconditioning , the process of replacing an undesired response to a stimulus with an acceptable response.  Systematic desensitization: The client is exposed to progressively more anxiety-provoking images of stimuli while the client is in a relaxed state. Contingency management is a form of behavioral therapy that involves the principle of rewarding a client for desired behaviors and not providing rewards for undesired behaviors.  Token economy: Residents who perform desired activities earn plastic chips that can later be exchanged for a tangible benefit.
  • The cognitive theories of theorists like Beck emphasize disturbed ways of thinking. In interventions based on behavioral theory, clinicians focus on observable behaviors, while those adhering to a cognitive perspective work with clients to change maladaptive thought patterns. AUTOMATIC THOUGHTS: Ideas so deeply entrenched that the individual is not even aware that they lead to feelings of unhappiness and discouragement. DYSFUNCTIONAL ATTITUDES: Personal rules or values people hold that interfere with adequate adjustment. Even cognitively oriented theorists fail to provide an overall explanation of personality structure, restricting their observations to particular problem areas.
  • The central nervous system consists of the brain and the nerve pathways going to and from the spinal cord. Neuron: Nerve cell. Synapses : Where neurons meet to transmit electrochemical signals from one to another. Axon: Part of the neuron that releases chemicals called neurotransmitters to transmit signal. Dendrite: Receiving part of a neuron. A neuron may have numerous axons and dendrites. An EXCITATORY SYNAPSE is one in which the message communicated to the receiving neuron makes it more likely to trigger a response. An INHIBITORY SYNAPSE decreases the activity of the receiving neuron. Neurons do not touch; instead, there is a gap at the juncture between neurons called the SYNAPTIC CLEFT .
  • Excitatory neurotransmitters (e.g., norepinephrine) increase the likelihood a receiving neuron will trigger a response. Inhibitory neurotransmitters (e.g., GABA) “slow down” the nervous system. Enkephalins: the body’s naturally produced painkillers. Researchers hypothesize that serotonin is involved in various disorders including OCD, depression, and eating disorders. An excess of dopamine could cause symptoms of schizophrenia whereas a deficit causes trembling and difficulty walking, symptoms of Parkinson’s.
  • A person's genetic makeup can play an important role in determining certain disorders such as predispositions toward depression or schizophrenia. In trying to assess the relative roles of nature and nurture, researchers have come to accept the notion of an interaction between genetic and environmental contributors to abnormality.
  • Treatments based on the biological model involve a range of somatic therapies, the most common of which is medication . More extreme somatic interventions include psychosurgery and electroconvulsive treatment (“shock treatment’). Biofeedback is a somatic intervention in which clients learn to control various bodily reactions associated with stress.
  • In contemporary practice, most clinicians take an integrative approach in which they select aspects of various models rather than adhering narrowly to a single one.
  • Halgin6e ppt ch04

    1. 1. Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne University of Massachusetts at Amherst slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Abnormal Psychology Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 5e Clinical Perspectives on Psychological Disorders 6e Richard P. Halgin Susan Krauss Whitbourne slides by Travis Langley Henderson State University Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    2. 2. Theoretical Perspectives Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Chapter 4
    3. 3. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Theoretical Perspective an orientation to understanding the causes of human behavior and the treatment of abnormality. The Purpose of Theoretical Perspectives in Abnormal Psychology Theoretical perspectives influence the ways in which clinicians and researchers interpret and organize their observations about behavior.
    4. 4. Psychodynamic Perspective <ul><li>Freudian Psychoanalytic Theory </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) Psychodynamic Perspective
    5. 5. <ul><ul><li>Personality Structure </li></ul></ul>Id Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. In Freudian theory, the ID is the instinctive, inborn part of personality. Freud
    6. 6. <ul><ul><li>Personality Structure </li></ul></ul>Freud Id Ego Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. In Freudian theory, The EGO is the center of conscious awareness.
    7. 7. <ul><ul><li>Personality Structure </li></ul></ul>Superego Freud Id Ego Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. In Freudian theory, the SUPEREGO controls the ego’s pursuit of the id’s desires.
    8. 8. <ul><li>Freud </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Defense Mechanisms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Various tactics people use to keep unacceptable thoughts, instincts, and feelings out of conscious awareness. </li></ul></ul></ul>Psychoanalytic Freud Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    9. 9. Defense Mechanisms <ul><li>High Adaptive Defenses: </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy responses to stressful situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Humor </li></ul><ul><li>Self-assertion </li></ul><ul><li>Suppression </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    10. 10. Defense Mechanisms <ul><li>Tactics people use to protect themselves from anxiety by keeping unacceptable thoughts, instincts, and feelings out of conscious awareness. Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>High defense mechanisms (e.g., humor) </li></ul><ul><li>Mental inhibitions (e.g., displacement) </li></ul><ul><li>Disavowal (e.g., denial) </li></ul><ul><li>Image distortions (e.g., splitting) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    11. 11. Psychodynamic Perspective <ul><li>Oral </li></ul><ul><li>Anal </li></ul><ul><li>Phallic </li></ul><ul><li>Latency </li></ul><ul><li>Genital </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Psychosexual Stages
    12. 12. Post-Freudians and Criticism <ul><li>Carl Jung (1875-1961) </li></ul><ul><li>Alfred Adler (1870-1937) </li></ul><ul><li>Karen Horney (1885-1952) </li></ul><ul><li>Erik Erikson (1902-1994) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    13. 13. Post-Freudians and Criticism <ul><li>Secure </li></ul><ul><li>Ambivalent (preoccupied) </li></ul><ul><li>Avoidant (includes fearful and dismissive) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Infant Attachment Style (Ainsworth)
    14. 14. Humanistic Perspective <ul><li>Person-Centered Theory (Rogers) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    15. 15. Humanistic Perspective <ul><li>Person-Centered Theory (Rogers) </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Actualization Theory (Maslow) </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    16. 16. Humanistic Perspective <ul><li>Person-Centered Theory (Rogers) </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Actualization Theory (Maslow) </li></ul><ul><li>Client-Centered Therapy </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    17. 17. Sociocultural Perspective <ul><li>Theorists within the sociocultural perspective emphasize the ways that individuals are influenced by people, social institutions, and social forces. </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    18. 18. Family Perspective <ul><li>Intergenerational approach </li></ul><ul><li>Structural approach </li></ul><ul><li>Strategic approach </li></ul><ul><li>Experiential approach </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. 4 major approaches: Proponents of the family perspective see abnormality as caused by disturbances in family interactions and relationships.
    19. 19. <ul><li>Social discrimination </li></ul><ul><li>Social influences & historical events </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Family therapy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Group therapy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multicultural approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Milieu therapy </li></ul></ul>Sociocultural Perspective Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    20. 20. Behavioral Perspective <ul><li>Classical Conditioning (Pavlov) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stimulus Generalization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stimulus Discrimination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aversive Conditioning </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    21. 21. Behavioral Perspective Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Operant Conditioning (Skinner) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Primary reinforcers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Secondary reinforcers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive vs. negative reinforcement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Punishment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extinction (occurs with classical or operant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shaping </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Behavioral Perspective Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Classical Conditioning </li></ul><ul><li>Operant Conditioning (Skinner) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Learning and Cognition </li></ul>
    23. 23. Behavioral Perspective Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Classical Conditioning </li></ul><ul><li>Operant Conditioning (Skinner) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Learning & Cognition </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Counterconditioning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Systematic Desensitization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contingency Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Token Economy </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Cognitively Based Theory <ul><li>Treatment focuses on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Automatic thoughts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dysfunctional attitudes </li></ul></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    25. 25. Biological Perspective Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Within the biological perspective , disturbances in emotions, behavior, and cognitive processes are viewed as being caused by abnormalities in the functioning of the body.
    26. 26. Neurotransmitter <ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>acetylcholine </li></ul><ul><li>GABA </li></ul><ul><li>serotonin </li></ul><ul><li>dopamine </li></ul><ul><li>norepinephrine </li></ul><ul><li>enkephalins </li></ul><ul><li>a chemical substance released from a transmitting neuron (nerve cell) across a synapse to be absorbed by a receiving neuron </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    27. 27. Genetic Influences <ul><li>Deoxyribonucleic acid </li></ul><ul><li>(DNA): </li></ul><ul><li>23 sets of paired strands </li></ul><ul><li>spiral into double helix </li></ul><ul><li>contain information cells need to manufacture protein </li></ul><ul><li>organized into chromosomes </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    28. 28. Treatment: Somatic Therapies Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. <ul><li>Psychosurgery </li></ul><ul><li>Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) </li></ul><ul><li>Medication </li></ul><ul><li>Biofeedback </li></ul>
    29. 29. Biopsychosocial Perspectives: An Integrative Approach <ul><li>Ways in which clinicians integrate various models include </li></ul><ul><li>technical eclecticism </li></ul><ul><li>theoretical integration </li></ul><ul><li>c ommon factors approach </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
    30. 30. <ul><li>For more information on material covered in this chapter, visit our Web site: </li></ul>Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. http:/ www.mhhe.com/halgin6e

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