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Story 2 Story 2 Document Transcript

  • Title: The TipVocabulary:Nickels: is the U.S. coin worth 5 cents, or 5/100 of a dollarPennies: A one-cent coin equal to one hundredth of a dollarDish: a particular variety of foodBrusquely (adverb of the word: brusque): abrupt or offhand in speech or mannerDepart: leaveTwo Nickels and Five Pennies In the days when an ice cream sundae cost much less, a10-year-old boy entered a hotel coffee shop and sat at a table. A waitress put a glass ofwater in front of him. "How much is an ice cream sundae?" "Fifty cents," replied thewaitress. The little boy pulled his hand out of his pocket and studied a number of coins init. "How much is a dish of plain ice cream?" he inquired. Some people were now waitingfor a table and the waitress was a bit impatient. "Thirty-five cents," she said brusquely. Thelittle boy again counted the coins. "Ill have the plain ice cream," he said. The waitressbrought the ice cream, put the bill on the table and walked away. The boy finished theice cream, paid the cashier and departed. When the waitress came back, she beganwiping down the table and then swallowed hard at what she saw. There, placed neatlybeside the empty dish, were two nickels and five pennies - her tip.