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Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance
 

Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance

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A quick overview of why African Americans moved to Northern cities at the beginning of the 20th Century and how Harlem became the center of African American culture.

A quick overview of why African Americans moved to Northern cities at the beginning of the 20th Century and how Harlem became the center of African American culture.

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    Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance Great Migration and Harlem Renaissance Presentation Transcript

    • As you read Langston Hughes’poem “The South,” be thinking of these questions:What does the poem reveal about life in the South?What does the poem suggest is the solution to life in the South?What does the poem reveal about life in the North?
    • Read “One Way Ticket”What does it say about life in the South?
    • What Langston Hughes isdescribing here is a process called “The Great Migration” when African Americans in largenumbers left the South to move to big cities in the North, such as Detroit, Chicago, Philadelphia, Cleveland, and New York.
    • They left to escape the racism anddiscrimination of the South as wellas for the job opportunities of the North.
    • Those African Americans that went to New York City inevitably ended up in Harlem, on the northern edge of Manhattan Island, andwhat developed there through the1920s and 1930s was a period that became known as the “Harlem Renaissance.”
    • As you listen to these songs, each by Duke Ellington, what is themood that each selection evokes: East St. Louis Toodle-oo The Mooche Mood Indigo
    • Listen for connections across varied disciplines as you read the fourthparagraph of Lindy Hop in Harlem: The Role of Social Dancing. Think aboutexamples from todays popular culture that show connections across music, dance, and art.
    • When you look at these paintings, what do you see/feel?Street Life, Harlem by William H. Johnson Jeunesse by Palmer Hayden
    • Listen to “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.” What do you think it means?
    • Listen to “Harlem.” What do you think it means?
    • What were you able to learn about the Harlem Renaissance by listening to jazz music? …by reading an essay? …by looking at paintings?…by reading/listening to poems? Answer these in a writingassignment due on Friday, March 2, 2012