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For the Studies of Religion HSC Course

For the Studies of Religion HSC Course
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Hsc marriage-judaism-2010 updated Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MARRIAGE HSC RELIGIOUS TRADITION DEPTH STUDY: JUDAISM Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 2. Students learn about : SIGNIFICANT PRACTICES IN THE LIFE OF ADHERENTS ONE significant practice within JUDAISM drawn from: Death and Mourning Marriage Synagogue Services Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 3. Students learn to:  Describe ONE significant practice within Judaism drawn from - death and mourning; marriage; and synagogue services.  Demonstrate how this practice expresses the beliefs of Judaism  Analyse the significance of this practice for both the individual and the Jewish community. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 4. RELIGIOUS RITES IN JUDAISM: Rites of passage are important elements of religious identity within the Jewish tradition. They are celebrations of, and memorials to, the covenants by which Jews understand their relationship with God as expressed in the Torah. For community worship, the synagogue is the focus, where the central place of the Torah is evident and the rituals cement the individuals place within the community. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 5. Religious rites and their effect on the everyday lives of believers : Provide continuity within the tradition – because religious rites are usually based on foundational events/stories. Provide opportunity for transformation of the individual. eg. rites of passage =transformed status eg. rites of public worship = transformed individually to live closer to the ideal as a result of communion. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 6. RITES OF PASSAGE A rite of passage is an important and often complex ritual that allows an individual or individuals to be transformed from one stage to another ie. from an old status to a new status. Rites of passage affect this change of status as well as proclaiming it to the community. Thus there is a strong community element in rites of passage – it confirms the beliefs of the group, encourages group cohesion, and teaches moral lessons. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 7. Results of religious rites of passage in Judaism Spiritual growth A deeper relationship with God A new, often higher status in the religious community Additional rights and responsibilities A reminder of the history of Israel Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 8. Jewish Marriage as a rite of passage The couple are required to be over the age of 18 years. Jewish weddings can take place on any day except the The time Shabbat and festivals. Most Jewish weddings take place on a Sunday, usually in the afternoon. The wedding ceremony may takes place in the synagogue or The place outside. It always takes place under a chuppah or canopy. The rite of marriage is a public ceremony- the couple are required to make their vows in public. Also present are 2 The witnesses, families and friends and a rabbi usually officiates, participants though it can be any observant Jew – marriage under Jewish law is a contractual agreement between a man and a woman. A minyan is required to be present for the blessing. In Judaism marriage is seen as the ideal human state. Marriage is rated very highly, it is seen as the way to emotional and spiritual fulfillment. Marriage is the basic social institution in Judaism. The charter Marriage provides physical fulfillment in the form of sexual expression. Marriage is seen as a personal relationship. Marriage is a holy covenant- bound by contract. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 9. DESCRIBE… Provide characteristics and features Describe ONE significant practice within Judaism drawn from - death and mourning; marriage; and synagogue services. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 10. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 11. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 12. A Jewish Wedding A Basic Overview of the Jewish Marriage Service. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 13. Before the marriage, the bride and groom sign the Ketubah to show that they are both willing to enter into the marriage. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 14. It sets out the promises that the couple make to each other for a long and happy marriage. They sign it in front of the rabbi and witnesses, who also sign the Ketubah. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 15. Jewish weddings usually take place on a Sunday. They are not allowed to be held on a Saturday because of the Shabbat. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 16. The marriage ceremony takes place under a canopy, the Chuppah. It is symbolic of the home that the couple will establish together. It has a roof but no walls to show that family and friends will always be welcome Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 17. The groom arrives escorted by his parents. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 18. The bridesmaids and groomsmen arrive. They will stand with the best man at the front on either side of the Chuppah. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 19. The bride walks down the path with her mother and father on either side. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 20. Her parents hand her over to the groom. Both sets of parents then stand on either side of the couple while the ceremony takes place. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 21. The wedding begins with a reading from the scriptures. Then the groom and bride exchange rings which are a symbol of marriage and the hope for an unbroken union. At the end of the ceremony, the groom breaks a glass. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 22. The ceremony is over. The couple are now husband and wife. The congregation call out in Heberw, “Mazal Tov! Mazal Tov!” which means ‘good luck and congratulations”. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 23. At the reception after the ceremony, everyone holds hands and dances the Hora, the circle of life. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 24. At the end of the dance, the bride and groom are lifted onto chairs and paraded around the room. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 25. The Detailed Version Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 26. The bride visits the mikveh- immersion pool (Orthodox) On the shabbat before the wedding, the groom is called to read the Torah. The couple may fast before the ceremony (Orthodox) Lifting of the veil. Marriage contract – ketubah Wedding takes place under the Chuppah. The Bride is escorted by either her parents or both mothers Escorts carry candles set Bride circles groom seven times form Initial blessing are recited – over wine as both partners drink from a cup The giving of the ring – where life long commitment is implied by the words spoken Marriage closes with blessings recited over a cup of wine. Recitation of the seven blessings. The breaking of a wine glass Yichud and fast is broken. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 27. The chuppah symbolises the marital home into which the groom now brings his bride. It is used to make present to the believers the centrality of the home, and the role of the wife as homemaker, The and in bringing up and teaching the Symbols children.. The ketubah reinforces the belief that marriage is a holy covenant. The smashing of the wine glass further links the couple to the history of Israel. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 28. Beliefs as outlined in Marriage Once married, the wife has responsibility for the home in order to free her husband to study the Torah. The wife is required to keep a kosher home and to bring up and teach the children. Her The role relations responsibility is to ensure that all that goes on in the home is expressive of Judaism. The role of the husband is to provide for and protect the family. Both roles are seen as equally important, and marriage is viewed as an equal partnership. Prior to marriage this couple were single and from 2 separate families. Marriage unites these two people together in love, forming a new family unit in which The husband and wife are responsible for one another transformation and for their children. Together the couple are now responsible for continuing the Jewish Nation by starting a family, keeping the mitzvah and bringing up children in the Jewish tradition. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 29.  Demonstrate how this practice expresses the beliefs of Judaism DEMONSTRATE… Show by example Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 30. How the Jewish Rite of Marriage makes present the central beliefs o Provide a basis for the ethical teachings about marriage Various rituals are derived from the Hebrew scriptures and these assist the practising Jew in maintaining a knowledge of certain parts of the Sacred Texts Torah and other parts of the Hebrew Bible.  Marriage is seen as a personal, contractual relationship. The Talmud specifies the role played by the ketubah in the marriage rite, reinforcing the belief that marriage is a holy covenant, a contractual relationship. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 31. Analyse the significance of this practice for both the individual and the Jewish community. ANALYSE… Identify components and the relationship between them; draw out and relate implications. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 32. The significance of Marriage For Judaism, marriage serves three interrelated purposes. 1. The propagation of the human species, as commanded in Genesis 1:28, "Be fruitful and multiply". According to talmudic law, this obligation is deemed to have been fulfilled when a man has begotten at least one son and one daughter, just as God created male and female in the Garden of Eden. http://www.liberaljudaism.org/lj_wherewestand_marriage.htm Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 33. The significance of Marriage 2. Marriage affords loving companionship. Again in the words of the Book of Genesis, "It is not good that man should be alone.... Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave to his wife, and they become one flesh" (Genesis 2:18 and 24). http://www.liberaljudaism.org/lj_wherewestand_marriage.htm Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 34. The significance of Marriage 3. Marriage establishes the family as the basic social unit, and the home as the "little sanctuary" (Ezekiel 11:16). It is where children can grow up under the loving protection and guidance of their parents, and where the Jewish religion can be practised and transmitted from generation to generation. http://www.liberaljudaism.org/lj_wherewestand_marriage.htm Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 35. The significance of marriage for both the individual and the community: Marriage is seen as a personal, contractual relationship. Marriage is seen as the fulfilment of the Mitzvah. All Jewish men and women are expected to marry. This is the first commandment – located in Genesis. Marriage is a holy covenant. Marriage is a religious obligation. Marriage structures the lives of the couple and assigns clear roles to each partner. Marriage fulfils a mitzvah as it is a positive religious duty. Marriage signifies the beginning of a new family. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 36. Marriage focuses on the centrality of the home and family and thus the continuation of the Jewish nation. Marriage is a way of holiness for the couple. It is through their relationship and the following of the mitzvah that the couple builds their relationship with God. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 37. Within the marriage ceremony, the seven blessings praise God for the creation of all things, linking the couple to the story of creation and the history of the Jewish people. Elevates the ordinary/mundane to the supernatural. It is a means of contact with God, who is present at the ceremony. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 38. A means of identification with Judaism and with the Jewish community. It helps the couple to understand more clearly the central beliefs of Judaism. The marriage ceremony also strengthens the community of believers by putting the couple on equal footing with other married couples within the community and making them responsible for ensuring their life style is in keeping with Jewish teaching and tradition. Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 39. Video Analysis Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 40. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 41. Ketubah ~ 6 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 42. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 43. Processional ~ 5 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 44. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 45. ‘My big fat Jewish Wedding’ ~ 7 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 46. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 47. ‘My big fat Jewish Wedding’ ~ 7 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 48. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 49. Mikvah ~ 2 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 50. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 51. Wedding ~ 13 minutes Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 52. Video Analysis For each video, write down key/ identifying features of the ritual depicted. (want to collate these at the end) What things stand out? Common features? etc Monday, 28 June 2010
  • 53. end Monday, 28 June 2010