Script Write Tutorial 02

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Theme
(What are you trying to say?)
Story vs. stereotype
Premise
(where does the struggle lead?)
Opposite premise

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  • This is the session for whole-of-group project updates and check-ins. Refer to the Teams doc on the BB site to see who is the Team Leader (TL) of the relevant teams.
  • During the meeting sessions, go around and check in on each team. See how they’re going, make sure they’re generally on the right track. Have they defined their subcategories clearly enough? Are their roles within the teams clear?
  • Script Write Tutorial 02

    1. 1. SCME 2071 Introduction to Script Writing Tutorial Two
    2. 2. Schedule • 2:00-2:15 Roll call • 2:15-2:45 Theme – What are you trying to say? • 2:45-3:30 Premise – where does the struggle lead? • 3:30-3:45 Opposite premise: avoiding one-sided stories • 3:45-4:45 Writing time • 4:45-5:00 Share one paragraph for comments
    3. 3. Theme • What are you trying to say? (Avoid over-generalisation or cliché. Aphorisms are better) *An aphorism is an original thought, spoken or written in a concise and MEMORABLE form Example: “Power corrupts, absolute power corrupts absolutely” (Lord Acton). “Having nothing, nothing can he lose.” (Henry VI) “What Reason weaves, by Passion is undone.” (Alexander Pope).
    4. 4. Story vs. stereotype Common storytelling clichés - Characters describing themselves in mirrors - Countdown clocks - “It was all a dream”. - Overgeneralisation Blaming bad behaviour on bad parenting The chosen one The Bechdel Test One-dimensional (job, race, social stereotype) characters "One's a cop, one's a redneck, one's a woman, one's an Asian, one's a nuclear reactor engineer...."
    5. 5. The difference between story and stereotype is enthusiasm. Should random hero go through the cave because its where the next “boss fight” occurs? or should he go to that cave because he himself has a reason to go, a reason to fight, a reason as to why he needs to enter that boss fight.
    6. 6. Premise 1. Character – what is the essential quality or vice? 2. Conflict – what is the central struggle? what kind of plan does it involve? 3. Conclusion – what does this struggle lead to?
    7. 7. Opposite premise 1. Character – what is the essential quality or vice? 2. Conflict – what is the central struggle? what kind of plan does it involve? 3. Conclusion – what does this struggle lead to?
    8. 8. Writing time 1) What three small details (premise, theme, enthusiasm) could you make to your story? Make a list. 2) How would each detail change the rest of the story IF you changed it?
    9. 9. References Story Tropes to avoid http://romanjones.deviantart.com/journal/Storytelling-Tropes-to-Avoid-353449079 Top 10 Storytelling Cliches Writers Need To Stop Using http://litreactor.com/columns/top-10-storytelling-cliches-that-need-to-disappear-forever Stereotypes vs. story http://www.onlysp.com/stereotypes-vs-story/

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