Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Hawaiian Approaches to Teaching and Learning<br />Trisha Kehaulani Watson, JD, PhD<br />watson@honuaconsulting.com<br />
Introduction<br />Born and raised in Manoa (O`ahu)<br />Punahou School <br />B.A. (Sociology and American Studies) Univers...
Know your place and you will find your place.<br />Context is everything.<br />
Mom<br />
Teaching to Teach<br />
Kumu (Sources)<br />Parents/Community<br />Teachers<br />Care for our children.<br />Care for their health.<br />Care for ...
Ina pa`a `ole ka pohakukihi,ha`ule ka paia.<br />
If the corner stone is not set properly, the wall shall collapse.<br />What is the wall?<br />What is the corner stone?<br />
The Anatomy of a Conflict<br />
What I do…<br />
Enhancing Communication, Finding Common Ground<br />Approach<br />listening<br />How do you approach a particular communit...
Don’t do a job, build a relationship.<br />“This is where we lay our heads.”<br />
In short: be a good scientist.<br />Be responsible.<br />Be honest.<br />Be open minded.<br />Be ethical.<br />Obtain info...
Follow ethical standards<br />Do no harm<br />Prior and informed consent<br />Consultation<br />Information<br />Participa...
Open Communication +Relationship<br />communication<br />relationship<br />Avoid misunderstandings (and thereby conflict)<...
Kaho`olawe: Kinolau o Kanaloa<br />
Hawaiian Approaches to Science<br />Understanding Unique Perspectives on Context and Content<br />
Papahanaumoku<br />`Aina kapu<br />Understanding kapu<br />The context and history of the kapu system<br />Respecting kapu...
Hawaiian knowledge should not be included because it’s cultural, it must be included because it’s indigenous.<br />
It’s just good science.<br />
Place Names<br />Holoikauaua<br />`Iliopi`i<br />Kalaeoka`ilio<br />Pu`uanahulu<br />
Final Suggestions<br />If you have good communication and a good relationship, you will be more likely to find a place of ...
Mahalo!<br />Questions?<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Hawaiian Approaches To Teaching And Learning

320

Published on

Powerpoint given during Community Ocean Sciences training in Hilo

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
320
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Kumu. Source. Kumu La`au = source of the leaves.
  • If the corner stone is not set firmly, the wall shall collapse. If education shall succeed, the relationship between the community and school needs to be right. What is the corner stone? What is the wall?
  • Activity!
  • Demeanors and values.
  • Nothing you are experiencing is unique. INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON METHODOLOGIES REGARDING FREE PRIOR AND INFORMED CONSENT AND INDIGENOUS PEOPLES45CFR46
  • Monk seal foraging study.
  • Naming. Puakea story.
  • Transcript of "Hawaiian Approaches To Teaching And Learning"

    1. 1. Hawaiian Approaches to Teaching and Learning<br />Trisha Kehaulani Watson, JD, PhD<br />watson@honuaconsulting.com<br />
    2. 2. Introduction<br />Born and raised in Manoa (O`ahu)<br />Punahou School <br />B.A. (Sociology and American Studies) University of Hawai`i, Manoa<br />M.A. Washington State University<br />J.D. William S. Richardson School of Law / Environmental Law Program<br />Ph.D. American Studies (Indigenous Epistemologies)<br />
    3. 3. Know your place and you will find your place.<br />Context is everything.<br />
    4. 4. Mom<br />
    5. 5. Teaching to Teach<br />
    6. 6. Kumu (Sources)<br />Parents/Community<br />Teachers<br />Care for our children.<br />Care for their health.<br />Care for their well-being.<br />To discipline them.<br />To raise them to respect and perpetuate familial and cultural traditions.<br />To teach them. <br />To be engaged with their larger world.<br />Peer evaluation and community regulation.<br />Provide learning and instruction outside the home environment.<br />Provide learning and instruction beyond the capacity of the parent.<br />Communicate to the parent / community.<br />Peer evaluation.<br />Institutional regulation and compliance. <br />
    7. 7. Ina pa`a `ole ka pohakukihi,ha`ule ka paia.<br />
    8. 8. If the corner stone is not set properly, the wall shall collapse.<br />What is the wall?<br />What is the corner stone?<br />
    9. 9. The Anatomy of a Conflict<br />
    10. 10. What I do…<br />
    11. 11. Enhancing Communication, Finding Common Ground<br />Approach<br />listening<br />How do you approach a particular community or group?<br />How do you identify stakeholders or essential individuals (i.e., leaders, parents, etc)? <br />Reading non-verbal behavior.<br />Listening to people; hearing people.<br />Responding appropriately.<br />Willing to turned down or turned away (i.e., be willing and ready to hear the answer “no” and accept it). <br />
    12. 12. Don’t do a job, build a relationship.<br />“This is where we lay our heads.”<br />
    13. 13. In short: be a good scientist.<br />Be responsible.<br />Be honest.<br />Be open minded.<br />Be ethical.<br />Obtain informed and prior consent.<br />Minimizing harm (including group harm). <br />
    14. 14. Follow ethical standards<br />Do no harm<br />Prior and informed consent<br />Consultation<br />Information<br />Participation<br />Capacity Building<br />Enabling Self-Empowerment<br />Representative and Inclusive Institutions<br />Minimize harm<br />Consider group harm<br />Obtain prior consent<br />Consider adverse effects<br />Take immediate corrective action when there are unexpected adverse effects<br />Take immediate responsibility for any immediate adverse effects<br />
    15. 15. Open Communication +Relationship<br />communication<br />relationship<br />Avoid misunderstandings (and thereby conflict)<br />Allow for inclusion of outside / community resources<br />Enhances innovation <br />Allows for community evaluation (ho`ike)<br />Demonstrates relevancy<br />Fosters curiosity <br />Minimize or mitigate misunderstandings (and thereby conflict)<br />Allows teacher or scientist to appreciate the context (and human dimensions) in which activity is taking place<br />Build community<br />
    16. 16. Kaho`olawe: Kinolau o Kanaloa<br />
    17. 17.
    18. 18. Hawaiian Approaches to Science<br />Understanding Unique Perspectives on Context and Content<br />
    19. 19. Papahanaumoku<br />`Aina kapu<br />Understanding kapu<br />The context and history of the kapu system<br />Respecting kapu<br />`Ike kapu<br />`Ike is not noa<br />When `ike is huna<br />Indigenous ways of learning and knowing<br />
    20. 20. Hawaiian knowledge should not be included because it’s cultural, it must be included because it’s indigenous.<br />
    21. 21. It’s just good science.<br />
    22. 22. Place Names<br />Holoikauaua<br />`Iliopi`i<br />Kalaeoka`ilio<br />Pu`uanahulu<br />
    23. 23. Final Suggestions<br />If you have good communication and a good relationship, you will be more likely to find a place of agreement and understanding.<br />A good relationship is one in which all parties teach and learn. <br />Remember that many local groups can use primarily passive and non-verbal communication. <br />
    24. 24. Mahalo!<br />Questions?<br />

    ×