NUTRITION FOR
COMPETITION
And Recovery
Overview
•  The type and timing of food and drink consumed is
extremely important and athletes must consider their pre-
ev...
Factors causing nutrition related fatigue
• Depletion of glycogen
stores
• Hypoglycemia (low
blood-sugar levels)
• Dehydra...
Nutrition and training
• Training often changes
considerably for an
athlete in the weeks
before competition.
• Modificatio...
Fuelling and type of sport
•  Shorter-duration sports
•  Moderate-intensity or intermittent sports
•  Prolonged submaximal...
Fuelling for shorter-duration sports
•  As fatigue is not usually caused by glycogen depletion
during high-intensity sport...
Fuelling for moderate-intensity of
intermittent sports
•  Sports lasting 60-90 minutes can be fuelled by ‘normal
glycogen ...
Fuelling for prolonged sub-maximal
events
•  Marathons, triathlons and cross-country skiing generally
last well over 90-mi...
Pre-event meal
•  Major goals:
•  Top-up glycogen stores
•  Top-up fluid levels
•  Leave gastrointestinal system comfortab...
Refueling during exercise
Nutrition and recovery from exercise
•  The key to speedy recovery of muscle/liver glycogen
stores is eat immediately afte...
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Nutrition of competition and recovery

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Nutrition of competition and recovery

  1. 1. NUTRITION FOR COMPETITION And Recovery
  2. 2. Overview •  The type and timing of food and drink consumed is extremely important and athletes must consider their pre- event, event and post event meals in relation to the requirements of their sport.
  3. 3. Factors causing nutrition related fatigue • Depletion of glycogen stores • Hypoglycemia (low blood-sugar levels) • Dehydration • Low sodium levels • Gastrointestinal upset
  4. 4. Nutrition and training • Training often changes considerably for an athlete in the weeks before competition. • Modification (tapering) of an athletes training program is critical to ensure optimum fuel and fluid levels can be achieved
  5. 5. Fuelling and type of sport •  Shorter-duration sports •  Moderate-intensity or intermittent sports •  Prolonged submaximal sports
  6. 6. Fuelling for shorter-duration sports •  As fatigue is not usually caused by glycogen depletion during high-intensity sports that last for less than 60 minutes, refueling during the event is not necessary. •  Appropriate glycogen and fluid intake before and after the event will ensure a ‘full tank’ is ready for the next training or performance.
  7. 7. Fuelling for moderate-intensity of intermittent sports •  Sports lasting 60-90 minutes can be fuelled by ‘normal glycogen stores’ in most well-trained athletes. •  Tapering of training and/or increased amounts of rest 24-36 hours prior to competition in combination with CHO intake of 7-10g/kg of body weight will ensure the athlete is well prepared •  Appropriate hydration (sports drinks) is also necessary
  8. 8. Fuelling for prolonged sub-maximal events •  Marathons, triathlons and cross-country skiing generally last well over 90-minutes •  These athletes would benefit from the process of Carbohydrate Loading. •  Tapering of exercise for 36-72 hours prior to the event is the most successful strategy to enhance CHO levels for the event. •  During the event, 30-60g of CHO is encouraged, as well as fluid replacement.
  9. 9. Pre-event meal •  Major goals: •  Top-up glycogen stores •  Top-up fluid levels •  Leave gastrointestinal system comfortable during the event •  Prevent hunger •  Should occur 1-4 hours prior to the event •  Should generally be foods of a LOW GI
  10. 10. Refueling during exercise
  11. 11. Nutrition and recovery from exercise •  The key to speedy recovery of muscle/liver glycogen stores is eat immediately after exercise (within 30-minutes after exercise) •  High GI foods are a better choice for glycogen replenishment •  A fluid volume equal to 150% of the fluid deficit should be consumed 2-4 hours after exercise to completely rehydrate the body. •  Electrolyte replacement is also crucial (sodium/potassium)

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