Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

How To Cultivate Success In Real Time: Part 2

798

Published on

Joseph Fung, CEO of TribeHR, a social HR platform, has published an e-book, “How to Cultivate Success in Real Time.” In the second installment, “Why Real-Time Technology Matters to Human Capital,” …

Joseph Fung, CEO of TribeHR, a social HR platform, has published an e-book, “How to Cultivate Success in Real Time.” In the second installment, “Why Real-Time Technology Matters to Human Capital,” Fung discusses the value and necessity of feedback—and how to act on it—along with the importance of utilizing technology and its various mediums to achieve company goals in a twenty-first century world.

Headquartered in Waterloo, ON and Boston, MA, TribeHR is the first truly social human resources management software. Its easy-to-use tools are used by businesses worldwide, allowing companies to focus more on what they do best and less on things that get in the way. TribeHR was founded in 2009 and is funded by Matrix Partners and Relay Ventures. For more information, visit www.tribehr.com.

1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • http://herbalink123.blogspot.com/
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
798
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. HOW TOCULTIVATE SUCCESSIN REAL TIME PART Why real-time technology matters to human capital 2 By Joseph Fung | CEO, TribeHR
  • 2. Why Real-Time TechnologyMatters to Human CapitalAbout TribeHRTribeHR helps companies achieve greatness by being the world’s first SocialHR Platform: The first to connect people, values, goals, and results; The first toconnect employees to managers and teams to each other; The first to create anHR platform that helps leaders truly engage employees to the mission andvalues of the organization, and create engagement by helping celebratesuccesses in all parts of the organization. It does this with software that is a joyto use, delivers insights without the social media noise, and eliminates theusual drudgery of HR administration—so there’s more time to focus on what’simportant.Copyright © TribeHR Corp. 2012Waterloo, ON, Canada and Waltham, MA, USA.All rights reserved.First Published September 2012.http://www.tribehr.com 24
  • 3. Contents About&TribeHR&.................................................................................................................& 4 2The$Real(Time$Imperative$.................................................................................$26 Competing&in&Real7Time&..................................................................................................& 6 2 Real7Time&Feedback&........................................................................................................& 7 2 Managers&.....................................................................................................................& 7 2 Employees&...................................................................................................................& 7 2 Customers& ...................................................................................................................& 9 . 2 Internal&Customers&......................................................................................................& 9 2 Acting&on&Feedback&.....................................................................................................& 0 3 Going&Social&.....................................................................................................................& 0 3 Bringing&it&Inside&..........................................................................................................& 0 3 Social&Goals&..................................................................................................................& 1 3 Leveraging&Technology&....................................................................................................& 3 3 Communication&...........................................................................................................& 3 3 Collaboration&...............................................................................................................& 4 3 Tracking&and&Monitoring&Tools&....................................................................................& 5 3 HR&Technology&.............................................................................................................& 5 3References$........................................................................................................$36Endnotes$ ..........................................................................................................$39$ . 25
  • 4. Why Real-Time TechnologyMatters to Human CapitalThe Real-Time ImperativeThe business environment is no longer a closed, easily controllable ecosystem. For thefirst time in history, we have four generations in the workplace at the same time. Manyof these workers make a habit of publicly sharing personal information in ways thathave never previously been possible. And most employees are connected to friends,family, co-workers, and the world, 24 hours a dayCreating a high-performance culture amid such complexity and connectivity requiresnew tools and new approaches that work in harmony with this new fluid environment.Not only will compliance, control and enforcement fail to produce the exceptionalculture you need to remain competitive, they simply don’t work in today’s workplaces.This is what we call the Real-Time Imperative.Competing in Real-TimeChange is happening now, not later. If things are not going well in your organization,your employees are searching for the next opportunity as you read this. When yourcompany makes a mistake with a customer, she is telling the world about it withinseconds. An awesome product you sent back for further review is about to be pre-empted by one that was quicker to market. Building a high-performance culture todaymeans embracing and competing in real-time.Your competitors can duplicate just about any advantage you have. They can poachyour people, reverse engineer your products, dispute your patents in court, and beatyour price. The one thing they can never replicate is the high-performance culture thatenables your sustained competitive advantage.At the same time, employees won’t buy into a culture that endorses outmodedmethods, superfluous structures, slow response times, lengthy review cycles, and 26
  • 5. cumbersome procedures. High-performance cultures in today’s organizations are user-friendly, dynamic, agile, and open to feedback.Real-Time FeedbackOne of the most effective changes a company can make to foster a high-performanceculture is to open the doors to feedback while shortening the feedback loop. Receivingand giving real-time feedback at all critical junctures is the ultimate goal; it meansimmediate, relevant feedback is continually offered in response to specific actions andcircumstances that directly impact organizational performance.ManagersTraditionally, managers have offered feedback to employees during annualperformance reviews, much like how teachers give end-of-the-year report cards toschool children. Recently, conscientious managers increased the frequency ofperformance reviews to bi-annually or even quarterly in order to maintain theirrelevance, but still offered feedback in stale, predictable, structured chunks.Real-time feedback means coaching and developing employees on a day-to-day basis:It’s paying attention to and acknowledging what they do right, when they do it, andoffering corrective coaching input. Managers who interact regularly with theiremployees build a relationship that encourages open communication and makes real-time feedback more effective.Although numbers and charts can be impersonal if used in isolation, supplyingemployees with timely metrics is another way to provide real-time feedback onperformance. A daily report can offer a concrete measure of what was achieved,highlight areas of strength, and reveal areas that need improvement. This kind ofimmediate, relevant feedback helps employees own their jobs. For instance, imagine anemployee starts seeing a pattern in her metrics. It seems that every Tuesday heroutgoing call-to-contact ratio is much higher than any other day, and she also had lullsin incoming call volumes. She learns that Tuesdays are difficult days to reach people,but the lower incoming volume allows her to spend more time on the fewer outboundcontacts she does make. She decides to reorganize her calling schedule to make themost of this trend by scheduling complex customer callbacks on Tuesdays.EmployeesEncouraging employees to provide feedback openly and without fear is an integral partof developing a high-performance culture. As an organization, you need to hear from 27
  • 6. your employees. Front-line employees are closest to customers and production lines.They know what’s working and what isn’t, and they often detect business issues beforemanagers do. Moreover, they want to be heard and they want to know that theirconcerns are being taken into consideration.There are a number of methods that you can use to gather feedback from employees.Ideally, as culture strengthens in an organization, employees will expect and offer real-time feedback as part of normal business practices, in addition to specific channels andrequests provided by company leadership.Comment Box: Comment boxes have been used for decades to gain feedback fromemployees. Now there are a number of online tools available to make this feedbackmechanism more immediate and effective. The main benefit (and challenge) of acomment box is anonymity. Anonymity allows for frank and open feedback withoutfear of retribution, but may reinforce the belief that open feedback is discouraged orrisky.Survey: Companies that want to check the pulse of the workforce may choose to usesurveys. Like the comment box, survey responses can remain anonymous. Since it canbe time-consuming to create, conduct, and analyze a survey, they are usually confinedto general feedback over a period of time, which can make the findings stale by thetime they are made available. In recent years, a number of electronic tools havebecome available that facilitate the collection of real-time feedback via short surveysand/or polls.Focus Group/Group Discussion: Like surveys, focus groups give employees thechance to be heard, but in this approach they have the opportunity to share theirfeedback in a supportive environment, rather than in isolation. A group of employeeswill often have similar concerns and they can support each other in the focus session,getting more ideas out into the open than an individual might develop alone. Focusgroups are also excellent for resolving organizational concerns as they surface.Interviews/Conversations: Individual interviews and one-on-one conversations canbe effective for gathering feedback, as long as the employee feels safe expressing honestopinions to the interviewer. If the dynamic between the interviewer and the employeeis constrained, the feedback will be unreliable. 28
  • 7. The business practice of encouraging employees to provide feedback has come a longways in recent years and continues to evolve. With increased technical resources,many more companies are able to streamline feedback collection by using tools such asonline surveys, or cultural engagement studies that can be initiated with a few clicks ofa mouse. The net effect is that the average employee feels better equipped andempowered to share feedback at work.CustomersThe crème de la crème of real-time feedback comes from customers. Listening andresponding to customer feedback is an integral part of high-performance cultures at alllevels of the organization. As much as possible, feedback should flow directly from thecustomer to the affected employees. Direct feedback from customers reverberates inthe psyche of the employee as they hear or read the actual comments made by thecustomer. Watered down, edited and filtered feedback is much less effective.Direct, positive feedback from a customer encourages employees and validates thework they do. Even poor or moderate feedback can be perceived as positive if theemployee is coached to identify and resolve weaknesses, and empowered to settlecustomer concerns.Except when a customer’s comments are inappropriate, abusive, false, or otherwisepresent a high risk of being damaging, customer feedback should be shared with asmany employees as possible. Accolades should be celebrated company-wide. Thisreinforces the value of excellent customer service. The positive feedback alsoencourages and engages employees, even if they weren’t the intended recipient of thefeedback. Finally, giving credit where credit is due when announcing the actualcustomer feedback, verbatim, is a great way of displaying the pride and excitementthat comes with a job well done.Internal CustomersIndividuals who buy your product or service are not your only customers when youembrace a culture of success. It is equally important to solicit feedback from internalcustomers to ensure your culture remains strong throughout the organization. Everymanager is an internal customer of the CFO who approves annual employee bonuses;the bookkeeper is an internal customer of the sales representative who submits expensereports for processing; the customer service representative is an internal customer of 29
  • 8. the developer who responds to client change requests; and everyone is an internalcustomer of the person who answers the phone and takes messages.How are your internal customers being treated? Do they feel valued and heard? Couldinternal customer service issues be bogging down your high-performance culture?Acting on FeedbackThe point of gathering real-time feedback is using it to drive competitive advantage byextracting recurring themes, fixing recurring problems, and acting on strategicsuggestions for improvement. In addition to putting the mechanisms in place to gatherregular, timely feedback, the real-time imperative demands that you act on what youlearn as quickly as possible. The good news is that it gets easier with practice. Asemployees learn from feedback and realize the direct effect their work has on thecustomer and the organization, they perform better. Customers, both internal andexternal, recognize the company’s commitment to continuous improvement andbecome invested in helping you succeed.Going SocialKPMG’s 2011 report, Going Social: How businesses are making the most of socialmediai, concludes that over 70 percent of organizations operating around the worldand across all industries are now active on social media. Companies are primarilyusing social media to talk directly with customers in real-time, with an eye to buildingstronger customer relationships and increasing customer loyalty. More recently, as thetools become more familiar, new uses have emerged and organizations are nowtapping into the social world to drive innovation in product and service developmentand to recruit.Interestingly, the report also found that emerging markets are leading more maturemarkets in the use and adoption of social media; perhaps because there are fewerestablished approaches and legacy systems to impede change. Regardless of location orindustry, however, the way business is conducted—the way people interact withorganizations and with each other—is changing. In business and elsewhere, it hasbecome clear that the world is no longer “going social”… It has already gone social.Bringing it InsideIt makes sense for companies to embrace the tools offered by web-based platforms andsocial media since they offer a powerful and effective means to: 30
  • 9. • Share information about the organization. • Remain relevant and current. • Build awareness in the marketplace. • Enhance corporate image and branding. • Open a dialogue with customers and potential customers. • Tap into the creativity of those using the products and services. • Respond quickly when things go wrong.As organizations become more adept with a wide range of digital platforms and socialmedia applications, the potential for using these tools internally becomes increasinglyapparent. Inevitably, it makes even more sense to bring these capabilities inside thecompany and put them to use enhancing a high-performance culture. When we revisitthe advantages of social media (described above) from the perspective of employeesand internal customers, we find that these tools also offer a powerful and effectivemeans to: • Share information about the organization internally (post policies, processes, training, etc.). • Remain relevant and current to employees (make them part of a team that is leading, not lagging, the field). • Build awareness among employees (share the vision and mission). • Enhance corporate image and branding internally (reinforce shared values). • Open a dialogue with employees (give and receive real-time feedback, offer public recognition). • Tap into the creativity of employees (provide channels for employee input into processes, products, and services). • Respond quickly when things go wrong (model accountability on all levels).Going social in an organization reinforces the ingredients of high-performancecultures. Going social outside the organization extends the boundaries of your culture,drawing customers and potential customers into the conversation. Doing both is apotent formula for sustainable competitive advantage.Social GoalsIn addition to the many opportunities for communication, connection, andreinforcement that “going social” offers your business, one function in particular hasthe potential to transform organizational performance: Social goals. 31
  • 10. Setting social goals brings a number of performance-enhancing elements into play inthe workplace. Industrial psychologists and behaviorists have been fascinated by theimpact of goal setting on employee motivation and performance since the early 1900’s.Core findings from research conducted in the latter half of the 20th centuryii identified anumber of factors that contribute to goal setting’s effectiveness in enhancingperformance in the workplace, including the following: • The highest or most difficult goals produce the highest levels of effort and performance. • Specific goals (as opposed to “do your best” goals) consistently lead to higher performance. • When employees are highly committed to achieving goals, their chances for success are much greater. • A number of factors contribute to increased commitment, including: o Understanding the importance of the target outcome and the value it brings to the organization o Committing publicly to the goal o Having the goal tied to an inspiring vision as expressed by a respected leader o Experiencing supportive responses from managers and leaders o Being involved in setting the goal o Expecting reward and/or recognition for achieving the goal o Feeling capable of attaining the goal (the right skills, aptitudes, training) o Receiving regular, timely feedbackIn the context of high-performance cultures, using web-based tools with socialinterfaces allows employees to set social goals that tie directly into the company’svision, values, and strategic direction as well as their own performance objectives andpersonal development goals. Social goals are set collaboratively and typically involvepublic sharing, specific objectives, and built-in feedback mechanisms withopportunities for recognition (from peers and supervisors). In their most effectiveforms, these tools foster self-efficacy by offering direct links to training resourcesneeded to accomplish the goal, and by providing real-time access to mentors forsupport. Social goals help employees gain ownership over their own work, while theirvisibility inspires teamwork and collaboration on an organizational level. 32
  • 11. The tools of Web 2.0 have created an environment where for the first time, a platformexists to support an integrated and consistent application of the well-researchedprinciples that enhance workplace performance and build cultures of success.Leveraging TechnologyThere are close to two billion users on the Internet today (almost 30% of the worldspopulation). Few businesses operate without some online involvement—certainly awebsite or social network profile at a minimum. For some industries the internet hasmeant complete disruption (retail and publishing come to mind), while for others it hasopened an opportunity to create entirely new ways of connecting and communicating,and for others still it has been a catalyst for the creation of entirely new businessmodels, like Software as a Service (Saas) and Freemium. There is no question that theInternet has changed the world and it continues to change the way business isconducted and companies compete.CommunicationOne of the most straightforward ways to leverage technology in support of high-performance cultures is through enhanced communications. Task-appropriate toolslike email, text messaging, live chat (text and voice), VOIP1 systems and videoconferencing all have a role to play in improving communication in today’sorganizations. As described earlier, the introduction of social technologies in theworkplace also enriches communication with options for personalizing, sharing, value-alignment, and 360° real-time feedback.Externally, companies are using web-based survey and polling tools for periodicmarket research, while they engage in conversations designed to develop deepercustomer relationships through online social media tools like Facebook, Twitter, blogs,and more. Additional corporate messaging can be readily shared via multi-mediachannels such as YouTube, Livestream, SlideShare, Prezi, SoundCloud, etc.The ability to leverage technology for communication is almost limitless. With manyof these web-based tools available free or for a reasonable monthly fee (SaaS) theseopportunities are not restricted to large corporations with gigantic communicationsbudgets.1 Voice over internet protocol 33
  • 12. CollaborationTechnology can also enhance opportunities for collaboration, strengthening internaland external relationships and contributing to a culture of success. The following aresome examples of how web-based and social technologies might be leveraged forgreater collaboration.Access to Enhanced Employee Profiles: When encountering a problem, an employeecan search through employee profiles to find an internal expert to help, resulting inspontaneous collaboration for problem solving. In this instance, even though help wasrequired, the employee took ownership of the process for resolving the problem andstrengthened an internal relationship at the same time.Wikis: A wiki is a website that allows users to add, modify, or delete content.Organizational wikis offer an environment where information can be simply shared oredited collaboratively. A wiki might serve as the company whiteboard, or as asuggestion box, or it might contain all company policies, procedures, manuals, etc.Wikis are flexible enough that separate teams, units, sections and divisions can eachhave their own information center, while collectively everything is stored on the samesystem or server. A wiki might be internal only, or open to customers. Some wikisallow different permissions or levels of access to different categories of users; forexample, allowing some users to add or edit, but not delete content.Shared Desktops: There are a number of tools that enable remote access to someoneelse’s computer. The most common use for this type of collaboration is technologysupport. The remote technician gains access to the co-worker’s (or customer’s) desktopin order to troubleshoot a problem, install software, or demonstrate an application.Real-time Collaboration/Web-conferencing: When desktop sharing is combinedwith other multi-media components such as audio, video and chat, it creates the senseof a “virtual space” where people can interact and collaborate in real-time, regardlessof location.Customer Co-Development: Technology also offers a number of possibilities forcollaborating with customers for quality improvement and product/servicedevelopment. Some examples include user-experience monitoring software that tracksmouse and eye activity; instant feedback buttons incorporated into websites; virtualfocus groups that enable remote customers to participate online; and wiki sites that 34
  • 13. allow customers to suggest improvements to existing products/services and share ideasfor new ones.Tracking and Monitoring ToolsOne significant technological development that brings an entirely new dimension toorganizational performance is the emergence of social media monitoring tools. Ascompanies have embraced social media, they have also sought ways to measure thetrue effectiveness of any new communication tools. Monitoring allows businesses totap into the broader conversation that takes place around their products and theirbrands, and helps them see the impact of social media and marketing campaigns inreal-time.HR TechnologyTraditionally, human resources management involves a lot of paperwork, timetracking and tedium in spite of the fact that it is supposed to be about people.Leveraging technology to automate the repetitive and administrative elements of HRfrees up valuable time for more important concerns, like being available to employeesand developing a high-performance culture.The ideal technology for enhancing culture through HR practices will streamline HRinformation management, while providing a platform that fosters employeeengagement and supports a social workplace. For example, effective social HRsoftware integrates recruiting, job boards, time-off tracking, and other administrativefunctions, while incorporating value-based social goals, real-time feedback andperformance reviews, peer recognition, self-service employee access, personalizedemployee profiles, and more.In the next chapter, we will discuss a number of ways that traditional human resourcespractices must change if cultivating a high-performance culture is your goal. With thepace of change and the increasing complexity of the workplace, there is no room foroutmoded, time consuming techniques that cling to “the way it has always been done”rather than exploring “the best way to do it today.”If you are not ready to deploy real-time technology to support your organization’shuman capital, then stay tuned for Part 3 in this series, Do Stale Processes Create StaleCultures?, coming November 26th. If you’re ready to unleash the power of your humanresources, then get started with TribeHR for free today. 35
  • 14. ReferencesAll brand features referenced within are protected by applicable trademark, copyright,and other intellectual property laws.Abdullah, H., Kumar, N., Yeng Ling, G. and Che Rose, R., 2008, OrganizationalCulture as a Root of Performance Improvement: Research and Recommendations,Contemporary Management Research, p.43-56;Ajzen, I., 2002, Constructing a TpB Questionnaire: Conceptual and MethodologicalConsiderations, consulted onhttp://socgeo.ruhosting.nl/html/files/spatbeh/tpb.measurement.pdf;Alveson, M., 2003, Understanding organizational culture, Sage Publication Ltd,consulted on http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/9432_010384ch3.pdf;Bakó, R.K., 2010, Organizational Discourses as Status Symbols, Acta UniversitatisSapientiae, Philologica, p.151-160, consulted on http://www.acta.sapientia.ro/acta-philo/C2-1/philo21-13.pdf;Cassell, C., and Symon, G., 2004, Essential Guide to Qualitative Methods inOrganizational Research, Sage Publications Ltd, London;Chandler, D., Semiotics for beginners, consulted onhttp://www.dominicpetrillo.com/ed/Semiotics_for_Beginners.pdf;Davies, H., Marshall, M., Mannion, R., and Scott, T., 2003, The QuantitativeMeasurement of Organizational Culture in Health Care: A Review of the AvailableInstruments, Health Serv Res, 923-945, consulted onhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1360923/pdf/hesr_154.pdf;Delobbe, N., Haccoun, R. and Vandenberghe, C., Measuring Core Dimensions ofOrganizational Culture. A Review of Research and Development of a NewInstrument, consulted onhttp://www.uclouvain.be/cps/ucl/doc/iag/documents/WP_53_Delobbe.pdf;deMunck, V.C., and Sobo, E.J., (Eds), 1998, Using methods in the field: a practicalintroduction and casebook. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press;Dominick, J.R., and Wimmer, R.D., 2010, Mass Media Research. An introduction,Wadsworth Publishing, Boston;Dwivedi, R.K., 1995, Organizational Culture and Performance, M D Publications PvtLtd; 36
  • 15. Friedman, W.J., 2010, The Zeigarnik Effect and Completing Everything, consulted onhttp://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=37538&cn=117;Gold, R.L., 1958, Roles in sociological field observation, Social Forces, 36, 217-223,consulted on http://cue.berkeley.edu/gold.pdf;Grady, M.P., 1998, Qualitative and action research. A practitioner guide, Phi DeltaKappa Educational Foundation, Bloomington, Indiana;Hancock, T. and Talwar R.,, The Future of HR. Transformational Thinking for a NewEra in Business, consulted onhttps://members.aesc.org/iweb/upload/The_Future_of_HR_Rohit%20Talwar%20%282%29.pdf;Hofstede, G., Neuijen, B., Ohayv, D.D., Sanders, G., 1990, Measuring OrganizationalCultures: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study Across Twenty Cases, AdministrativeScience Quarterly, Vol. 35, No. 2. p. 286-316, consulted on http://leeds-faculty.colorado.edu/selto/CURISES%202009%20Cost%20Mgt/CURISES%20Readings/hofstede%20et%20al%201990.pdf;Jani ijevi, N., 2011, Methodological Approaches in the Research of OrganizationalCulture, Economic Annals, Volume LVI, No. 189, p. 69 - 99, consulted onhttp://www.doiserbia.nb.rs/img/doi/0013-3264/2011/0013-32641189069J.pdf;Jung et al., 2007, Instruments for the Exploration of Organisational Culture, consultedonhttp://www.scothub.org/Working%20papers/Instruments%20for%20the%20Exploration%20of%20Organisational%20Culture%20-%20working%20paper%202007.pdf;Kotter, J.P., and Heskett, J.L., 1992, Corporate Culture and Performance, The FreePress;Lauder, M.A., 2003, Covert Participant Observation of a Deviant Community:Justifying the Use of Deception, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Vol. 18, No. 2, p.185–196;Mack, N., et al., 2005, Qualitative Research Methods: A Data Collector’s Field Guide,consulted onhttp://www.fhi360.org/nr/rdonlyres/emgox4xpcoyrysqspsgy5ww6mq7v4e44etd6toiejyxalhbmk5sdnef7fqlr3q6hlwa2ttj5524xbn/datacollectorguideenrh.pdf;McLafferty, I., 2004, Focus group interviews as a data collecting strategy, Journal ofAdvanced Nursing, 48(2), p. 187-194; 37
  • 16. Martin, M.J., 2011, In the process of becoming: The organizational culture of theMetropolitan Academic Library, consulted onhttp://library.ucf.edu/Staff/mjmartin/Martin_Dissertation.pdf;Morris, R., 1994, Computerized content analysis in management research: ademonstration of advantages and limitations, Journal of Management, consulted onhttp://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4256/is_n4_v20/ai_16549030;Nummelin, J., Measuring Organizational Culture in Construction Sector, consultedonhttp://crgp.stanford.edu/publications/conference_papers/Nummelin_CCIM_2006.pdf;Oedewald P., and Reiman, T., 2002, The assessment of organisational culture. Amethodological study, consulted on http://vtt.fi/inf/pdf/tiedotteet/2002/T2140.pdf;Pandey, S., 2009, Measuring Organizational Culture for Management Research: AContent Analysis Based Approach, consulted onhttp://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1512006Rowney J., and Taras V., Half A Century Of Measuring Culture: Approaches,Challenges, Limitations And Suggestions Based On The Analysis Of 121 InstrumentsFor Quantifying Culture, consulted onhttp://www.uncg.edu/bae/people/taras/measuring_culture.pdf;Rowney, J., Taras, V., and Steel, P., Half a Century of Measuring Culture:Approaches, Challenges, Limitations and Suggestions based on the Analysis of 121Instruments for Quantifying Culture, consulted onhttp://www.uncg.edu/bae/people/taras/Half_a_Century_of_Measuring_Culture.pdf;Serrat, O., 2010, A Primer on Corporate Values, consulted onhttp://www.adb.org/documents/information/knowledge-solutions/primer-on-corporate-values.pdf;Steudel H.J. and Yauch, C.A., 2003, Complementary Use of Qualitative andQuantitive Cultural Assessment Methods, Organizational Research Methods, Vol. No4, 461-485, consulted onhttp://www.eresearchcollaboratory.com/AOMComplementaryQualQuant.pdf;*The Economist Intelligence Unit, Global rms in 2020. The next decade of change fororganisations and workers, consulted onhttp://www.shrm.org/Research/SurveyFindings/Articles/Documents/Economist%20Research%20-%20Global%20Firms%20in%202020.pdf; 38
  • 17. *United States General Accounting Office, Program Evaluation and MethodologyDivision, 1996, Content Analysis: A methodology for structuring and analyzingwritten material, consulted on http://archive.gao.gov/f0102/157490.pdf;NY Times, “Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs”, March 14, 2012. Retrieved on April, 07 2012from: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/why-i-am-leaving-goldman-sachs.html?_r=2&pagewanted=1Endnotesi Going Social: How businesses are making the most of social media. KPMG International.KPMG surveyed more than 1,800 managers and 2,000 employees at organizations in ten majormarkets regarding their use of social media.ii Locke, E.A. and Latham, G.P. (2012) Building a Practically useful theory of goal setting andtask motivation: A 35-year odyssey. 39

×