Climate Change Adaptation Techniques for the Piedmont. S. Shuford

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Overview of climate change adaptation techniques with a focus on natural hazards faced in the Piedmont Triad of North Carolina. These hazards may become more acute due to climate fluctuations.

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Climate Change Adaptation Techniques for the Piedmont. S. Shuford

  1. 1. Scott Shuford, AICP1
  2. 2.  PAS Report – Collaborativeeffort Help planners incorporateenergy and climate changeconsiderations into their work2
  3. 3. Local Warming. It’stoo late to stopclimate change.What we can do isplan for it.3
  4. 4. CLIMATE ADAPTATION HAZARD MITIGATION Adjustment in natural orhuman systems inresponse to actual orexpected climatic stimulior their effects, whichmoderates harm orexploits beneficialopportunities. (IPCC;TAR) Hazard Mitigation issustained action takento reduce or eliminatelong-term risk to peopleand their property fromhazards and theireffects. (FEMA)4
  5. 5. WildfiresHeat WavesFloodingDrought5
  6. 6. 6WildfiresPhoto: NASA2006 California Wildfires
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. 9Community Wildfire Protection Plan✔ Step One: Convene Decisionmakers✔ Step Two: Involve Federal Agencies (USFS and BLM)✔ Step Three: Engage Interested Parties✔ Step Four: Establish a Community Base Map✔ Step Five: Develop a Community Risk Assessment✔ Step Six: Establish Community Priorities andRecommendations✔ Step Seven: Develop an Action Plan and AssessmentStrategy✔ Step Eight: Finalize Community Wildfire ProtectionPlan
  10. 10. 10
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. 13Firewise Communitieswww.ncfirewise.org
  14. 14. 14Heat WavesExcessive Heat Events Guidebook; EPA; 2006
  15. 15. 15Design for HeatImage by www.hopeplantation.org/
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. 17Source: Lawrence B. Livermore National Laboratory, Berkeley, California
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. 19
  20. 20. 20Heat Effects – Defense IndustryHeat Effects• Training• Equipment• Air Operations andInfrastructure• Energy Use• Ecosystem Management
  21. 21. Address population vulnerabilities at state,regional and local levelsConduct health impact assessmentsAddress population equity issues21
  22. 22. 22PopulationHeatWavesStorms FloodsAirPollutionDiseases (Food& Water Borne)Diseases(Vector Borne)Persons over 65 (the elderly)      Persons 14 & under      Persons with disabilities or chronicillnesses      Linguistically isolated persons (non-English speaking or English as asecond language - ESL)     Socially isolated persons, includingthe homeless      Single adults with children  Transportation-challenged (no car ortransit) persons  Persons residing in high crime areas   Persons residing in mobile homes     Persons with below median incomes     Persons residing in substandardhousing      Persons residing in multifamilystructures 
  23. 23. 23Low-Regrets Policy – Green InfrastructurePlanning Activity Possible Responses CommentsDelivery of social servicesEHE awareness programs.Coordination of EHE shelter operations.Medical assessment and treatment programs.Vulnerable population database.Distribution of light-colored clothing.Employer outreach.Reaching vulnerable populations withinformation and services is critical priorto and during EHEs. Employers need tounderstand the health consequencesof strenuous outdoor work duringEHEs.Design of buildingsand sitesDesign for natural ventilation.Install awnings and overhangs.Shade-providing landscaping.Backup electrical systems/generators.Use of heat-dissipating materials & colors.Retention of mature landscaping for shade.Energy-efficient design.Natural ventilation, especially inmultifamily buildings helps counterEHE effects. Energy-efficient designmakes it more likely for lower incomepersons to use their A/Cs. Naturallandscaping lessens the urban heatisland effect.Neighborhood andcomprehensive planningNeighborhood-based shelters.Vulnerable population database helps direct capitalimprovement programs.Advance planning for EHEs inneighborhood and community designis helpful.Recreational programs andamenitiesProvision of shade in parks and playgrounds.Timing/programming of outdoor recreation programsduring EHEs.Timing and programming (e.g., keepingpools open) offer reduced exposure toand relief from heat.Public safety planningEarly warning alerts.EHE shelter management operations.Coordination with electric utilities during EHEs.EHE awareness programs.Vulnerable population database.Increased law enforcement in high-crime areas duringEHEs.Early warning alerts from public safetyofficials get more attention.Coordination with utilities is critical.Knowing the location of vulnerablepopulations enhances response.People in high crime areas may notopen windows during EHEs.Utility system management,especially electricity andwater supplyNo scheduled maintenance or shutdowns duringEHEs.Coordination with public safety officials during EHEs.Continuity of utility operations iscritical to counter the effects of EHEs.
  24. 24. 24Photo: NASAHurricane IreneFlooding
  25. 25. 25A Walkable Place . . .BuncombeCountyGISaerialphoto;ShufordphotosBiltmore Village, Asheville, NC
  26. 26. 26. . . Can Become Swimmable.Photo courtesy of Mark Combs
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  28. 28. 28Source: http://sd.defra.gov.uk/images/2030infrastructure.jpg
  29. 29. 29New York City Subway GratesSimple Solutions
  30. 30. 30Design with NatureGreen InfrastructureImages from EPA’s Green Infrastructure Case Studies; 2010
  31. 31. Source:FHWA
  32. 32. All images – Popular ScienceOops!
  33. 33. 33DroughtNorth Carolina Drought Management Advisory Councilwww.ncwater.org
  34. 34. 3415A NCAC 02E .0614 Default Water UseReduction Measures During NCDMACExceptional Drought Designations
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  36. 36. 36Nuclear energy - North Carolina’s threesystems generate nearly 32 percent of thestate’s electricity.
  37. 37. Potable Water Supply – Conservation, Storage,New Sources, Inter-Community Linking,Emergency Supplies, Diversion from Non-Potable Uses, RetrofitsEnergy (Blackouts and Brownouts) –Understanding Vulnerability, ImprovedNational Electric Grid, Less Vulnerable Sources,Improved Efficiency, Conservation37
  38. 38. Reviewed some climate adaptation techniquesfor addressing wildfire, heat wave, floodingand drought impactsAddress these impacts in your HazardMitigation PlansAnd, most of all, remember that . . .38
  39. 39. 39It Takes a Team…• Long-range planning/communitydevelopment• Emergency response and naturalhazards planning• Economic development• Parks and open space• Transportation and engineering• Utilities (water, wastewater, etc.)• Administration/finance• Chamber of commerce• Public health• Social services• Local non-profits
  40. 40. As Extreme Weather Events Become More Common,We Will All Have An Extreme Weather Story or Two40Photo Credits:NOAA, FEMA,DOT, AP
  41. 41. 41Building CodesImages by Scott ShufordFlooding Adaptation
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  44. 44. Scott Shuford, AICP44

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