Photodocumentary Projects

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Photodocumentary Projects

  1. 1. 7/2/09 12:11 PMPhotodocumentary projects Page 1 of 2http://www.tomrchambers.com/pdpjs.html Photodocumentary projects Dyer Street Portraiture: Chambers returned to El Paso, Texas, the city of his alma mater (Austin High School), to take a look at a particular street, Dyer, that intrigued him when he was a teenager. He put together this project, and it was later exhibited at various galleries, and American Photo Magazine listed it in their Notable Exhibitions section, March, 1986 issue. This work provides intimate street shots, and reveals the nature of the environment by detailed background content. The environment is one of simultaneity, where military personnel blend with the locals. >> Descendants 350: Chambers put together this project as a part of Rhode Island's 350th Anniversary Celebration in 1986 (funded by Providence 350, Inc.). He chose to mix images of Descendants with text about their respective Ancestors (Founding Fathers) as a celebration, but also to encourage the study of history. The project was well-received, exhibited at ten different sites throughout Rhode Island, received a Governor's Proclamation (RI), and accepted by the Secretary of State (RI) as a part of the Rhode Island State Archives. Buy this book. >> Hot City: Chambers made over 100,000 images during his tenure as Staff Photographer for the Executive Office of the Mayor, Providence, Rhode Island. They provide an archival record of Providence and its people during 1985 to 1989, a period of time that echoed a listing by Newsweek magazine (February 6, 1989), which stated that Providence was one of the ten hottest cities to live and work in America. The exhibition was funded by Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank, and the negatives are a part of the City of Providence Archives. >> Southwest of Rusape: The Mucharambeyi Connection: When Chambers first arrived in Zimbabwe as a Peace Corps Volunteer, he had the opportunity to spend Christmas 1992 with the Mucharambeyi family in a rural area Southwest of Rusape. The images combine a documentary portrait style with the utilization of an environmental backdrop to convey the lifestyle in a Traditional African rural setting. The exhibition was funded by the United States Information Service (USIS), officially opened by the U.S. Ambassador to Zimbabwe and accepted as a part of the USIS Archives. >> People to People: Chambers teamed-up with Choi Ok-soo, a Korean documentary photographer, to have a two-person show and contrast their perspectives and styles. This was the first time that a Western (American) photographer and Eastern (Korean) photographer had come together in Gwangju, South Korea to show a dual approach at documentation of the Korean people. The images were accepted as a part of the Kumho Art Foundation Archives (1997). >> Buddha's Stones: A Stacking Comparison: When Chambers was living in South Korea, he traveled to the Buddhist temples on numerous occasions, and became interested in Buddhist philosophy (quotes follow). He also noticed a unique practice of stacking stones as a form of worship and asking for good fortune. He decided to document this behavior, and compare these stone formations as a study in
  2. 2. 7/2/09 12:11 PMPhotodocumentary projects Page 2 of 2http://www.tomrchambers.com/pdpjs.html technique, and to pay tribute to those Korean people involved with this form of religion.>> The People of Longhu Town: Chambers collaborated with Zhao Zhenhai, a Chinese documentary photographer, by putting together a two-person show, Zhao/Chambers Joint Photo Exhibition. This was the first time in Henan Province, China for a Chinese and an American photographer to come together to offer an East/West perspective on the Chinese People and Culture. Zhao's photos cover a twenty-year period (1984 - 2004) throughout China, and Chambers' photos were taken in 2004. >> Wide-screen China One, Wide-screen China Two, Wide-screen China Three, Wide-screen China Four, Wide-screen China Five and Wide- screen China Six: Chambers has been in China since 2003, and this black and white coverage of the people and environs is ongoing since that time. It involves a great deal of China [Zhengzhou, Kaifeng, Luoyang, Anyang, Deng Feng (Shaolin Temple), Dunhuang, Lonzhou, Xian, Xiahe, Beijing, Shanghai, Hanzhou, Shaoxing, Guilin, Yangsuo, Zhaoqing, Guangzhou, and Hong Kong]. The images are elongated for a wide-screen effect, and they are formatted as a slide show. Please allow considerable loading time. Buy this book. >> Wide-screen Hungary: Chambers spent two weeks [February 1 -15, 2006] in Hungary at the invitation of Istvan Horkay [artist and IDAA Committee Member], and this black and white coverage is of the Budapest and Revfulop [Horkay's hometown] areas. After a four-year working relationship on the Internet, Chambers and Horkay met in Beijing, China at the 2005 IDAA exhibition in November, 2005 and a second time in Hungary as these images indicate. They are elongated for a wide-screen effect, and they are formatted as a slide show. Please allow considerable loading time. Buy this book. >> Wide-screen India 1 and Wide-screen India 2: Chambers spent three weeks [July 10 - 28, 2006] in India at the invitation of the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad to conduct a workshop for its New Media Design graduate students. In between conducting the workshop, Chambers documented Ahmedabad and the surrounding areas. The images are elongated for a wide-screen effect, and they are formatted as a slide show. Please allow considerable loading time. Buy this book. >> The Great Wall: Color photographs of The Great Wall ... Mu Tian Yu ... near Beijing, China. These images are almost a private encounter in the sense that Chambers was alone most of the time during his trek along the ancient barrier. Chambers' students in China say, "You're not a man until you've walked the Great Wall." Chambers walked part of it, so he guesses he's 'part man'. The images are elongated for a wide-screen effect, and they are formatted as a slide show. Please allow considerable loading time. Buy this book. >>

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