What Can U Plug Into a USB?

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A basic overview of USB technology and plenty of examples of USB devices.

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  • What Can U Plug Into a USB?

    1. 1. Michael Sauers Technology Innovation Librarian Nebraska Library Commission
    2. 2. <ul><li>Universal Serial Bus </li></ul><ul><li>“ Universal” in the sense that it replaces parallel, serial, and SCSI ports </li></ul><ul><li>Allows up to 127 devices to be hooked up to a single computer </li></ul><ul><li>Devices are designed to be “hot swapped” </li></ul>
    3. 4. <ul><li>USB 1.1 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12Mbits/second </li></ul></ul><ul><li>USB 2.0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finalized in 2001 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>480Mbits/second </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Backwards compatible with 1.1 </li></ul></ul>
    4. 5. <ul><li>Type A </li></ul><ul><li>Type B </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Full-size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mini </li></ul></ul>
    5. 6. <ul><li>4.375V to 5.25V from the computer. </li></ul><ul><li>If a hub is used then the devices downstream may only use a total of 4 units of power. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hubs with more than 4 ports require external power. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If more power is needed than an external power supply must be connected. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>External hard drives </li></ul></ul>
    6. 7. <ul><li>Available in various lengths </li></ul><ul><li>5m (16ft) length limitation </li></ul>
    7. 8. <ul><li>Overcomes the 5m limitation </li></ul>
    8. 14. <ul><li>Allows you to connect a hub via Ethernet so USB devices do not need to be connected directly to a computer. </li></ul><ul><li>Good for networked storage and/or printers. </li></ul>
    9. 35. <ul><li>Up to 1GB </li></ul><ul><li>USB 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Backup software included </li></ul>
    10. 81. <ul><li>Yes, any of these devices that can store data are a potential security risk. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Schneier on Security: Hacking Computers over USB </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do you allow your patrons to use floppies or CDs? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you allow your patrons to access their e-mail? </li></ul>
    11. 82. <ul><li>However, you can minimize most of these in a few simple steps: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deep Freeze or Centurion Guard </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not allow booting from the USB port </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Password protect your BIOS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate the public computers from the library network </li></ul></ul>
    12. 83. <ul><li>If the device requires a drive letter you may not have one available. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn the key to the setting that disables the CD-ROM drive and reboot. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The computer may not allow the device drivers to be installed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reboot the computer into admin mode, insert the device, let the drivers install, remove the device, reboot into patron mode, reinsert the device. </li></ul></ul>
    13. 84. <ul><li>USB devices are designed to be “hot swapped” but storage devices should not be removed while reading or writing data due to potential data loss. </li></ul><ul><li>To properly remove a USB storage device, click on the or icon in your system tray then select the device. Wait for the “Safe to remove” message before unplugging the device. </li></ul>
    14. 85. <ul><li>USBGeek http://www.usbgeek.com </li></ul><ul><li>HowStuffWorks.com http://computer.howstuffworks.com/usb.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usb </li></ul><ul><li>Everything USB http://www.everythingusb.com/ </li></ul>
    15. 86. <ul><li>Michael Sauers </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>http://travelinlibrarian.info/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://del.icio.us/travelinlibrarian/usb </li></ul>

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