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Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End
 

Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End

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Part of monthly Quality In Action webinar series hosted by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End with Dr. Renee Spencer, September 2011.

Part of monthly Quality In Action webinar series hosted by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End with Dr. Renee Spencer, September 2011.

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    Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End Presentation Transcript

    • Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End
      September 7, 2011
      Quality in Action
    • Webinar Logistics
      Asking Questions & Sharing Comments During the Webinar
      “Raise your hand” & MPM Organizers will unmute you
      Or, type questions (and comments) in the question/answer section and submit; we will respond directly to you or possibly share your question with all attendees
      When unmuted, please monitor your background noise
      Polly Roach
      Vice President of Strategic Services
      Recordings of past webinars are available on our YouTube Channel.
    • Elements of Effective Practice
      Standard: Facilitation bringing the match to closure in a way that affirms the contributions of both the mentor and the mentee and offers both individuals the opportunity to assess the experience.
      Benchmarks
      B.6.1/2 Program has procedure to manage (un)anticipated closures, including a system for a mentor or mentee rematch.
      B.6.3. Program conducts and documents an exit interview with mentor and mentee.
      Enhancements
      E.6.1 Program explores opportunity to continue the mentor/mentee match for a second (or subsequent) year
      E.6.2 Program has a written statement outlining terms of match closure and policies for mentor/mentee contact after a match ends.
      E.6.3 Program hosts a final celebration meeting or event with the mentor and mentee to mark progress and transition.
    • QMAP Data: Closure
      R1. Develop and implement procedures to manage both anticipated and unanticipated match closures, including procedures for re-matching mentors and mentees.
      R2. Conduct exit interviews with mentors.
      R3. Conduct exit interviews with mentees.
      R4. Ensure mentors, mentees (and families when appropriate) understand program policy regarding communication and contact between mentors and mentees after documented match closure.
    • QMAP Data: Closure
      R1. Develop and implement procedures to manage both anticipated and unanticipated match closures, including procedures for re-matching mentors and mentees.
      R2. Conduct exit interviews with mentors.
      R3. Conduct exit interviews with mentees.
      R4. Ensure mentors, mentees (and families when appropriate) understand program policy regarding communication and contact between mentors and mentees after documented match closure.
    • Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End
      Renée Spencer, Ed.D., LICSW Boston University
      6
    • 7
      RIA Issue #5 - Overview
      Introduction
      Youth and Mentor Characteristics
      Relationship Processes
      Program Factors
      Early Ending Matches
      Discussion
    • Why should we care about endings?
      The lack of attention to endings in youth mentoring may inadvertently be contributing to false expectations that most relationships will be long-term if not life-long, when current evidence suggests otherwise.
    • 9
      Introduction
      What happens when mentoring relationships do not go well?
      Paying closer attention to what happens when things do not go well can help us better identify and meet the special challenges posed by creating and sustaining formal mentoring relationships between youth and adults.
    • Relationship Failure
      Estimates are that about half of formal mentoring end earlier than was planned at the start
      When relationships experience an earlier than expected ending within the first three months, they have potential to do harm
      New evidence suggests that short, but highly consistent formal relationships with frequent contact and planned endings may not run these same risks
      10
    • 11
      Negative Experiences
      Half of protégés report at least one negative mentoring relationship in adult workplace mentoring relationships
      Fundamental component of all interpersonal relationships
      • Are negative experiences
      “more salient”?
      • Challenges of formal
      mentoring matches
    • Phases of Relationship
      Decline is a passive drifting apart over time that accompanies the reductions in importance and level of closeness.
      Dissolution is more intentional or active termination of the relationship.
    • Thought provoking?
      A well-timed structural ending can encourage more of a psychological separation, enabling the protégé to try out functioning with less guidance and support. Premature structural endings may provoke feelings of abandonment and anxiety as a protégé is forced to function more independently before feeling ready to do so. A structural ending that occurs later than a psychological one may lead to feelings of resentment on the part of both protégé and mentor as the relationship no longer suits the needs of one or both parties. In all of these cases, endings may be functional or dysfunctional.
    • Case Study - Workplace
      (A) Mismatches in mentor and protégé personality, values and work styles
      (B) Lack of mentor expertise
      (C) Distancing and manipulative behavior on the part of the mentor
      (D) Poor attitude and/or
      (E) Personal problems on the part of the mentor.
    • Formal vs. Informal
      Protégés in a workplace mentoring program indicated that negative experiences in formal relationships had a greater effect on thoughts about quitting and workplace stress than did such experiences in informal mentoring relationships
    • Case Study - Psychotherapy
      One qualitative study of therapy relationships with interns found that all of the clients informed about the intern’s planned departure at the outset of treatment completed the full course of treatment whereas some of the clients who were not informed until near the end of the year did not return for subsequent sessions (Gould, 1978). Client reports indicate a desire for clear endings (e.g., Marx & Gelso, 1987) and it is commonly accepted practice wisdom that abrupt endings have the potential to be harmful in both the near and long term (Gelso & Woodhouse, 2002)
    • 17
      Relationship Processes
      Goal = Longer, Stronger Matches
      Relationship duration and strength are associated with youth outcomes
    • Role of Parents
      In our in-depth qualitative interviews we find parents often have significant insight into what contributed to the dissolution of the relationship and the consequences of poorly handled endings for their child (Spencer & Basualdo-Delmonico, 2010). This leads us to concur that involving parents and guardians at the early signs of relationship struggles may be helpful in determining the best course of action.
    • 19
      Other Process Factors
      Matching based on shared interests
      Consistency of contact
      Mentor’s approach
      Dosage - or amount of contact… what is more critical?
    • Program Factors
      Pre-match training and orientation
      Ongoing training
      Staff contact during relationship
      Resources/space
      Summer contact
      More satisfying and effective relationships (longer, stronger)
      20
    • 21
      Themes - Early Ending Matches
      Mentor or protégé abandonment;
      Perceived lack of protégé motivation;
      Unfulfilled expectations;
      Deficiencies in mentor relational skills including the ability to bridge cultural divides;
      Family interference;
      Inadequate agency support.
    • 22
      Preventing Relationship Failures
      Higher levels of program support
      Screen mentors for consistency and continuity
      Clear expectations for relationships*
      Discuss closure from the start
      Cultural training for participants**
      Monitoring of matches and ongoing training
    • 23
      Youth and Mentor Characteristics
      Youth
      Age at time of match
      Risk status
      Gender
      Mentors
      Income
      Marital status
      Age
    • 24
      Conclusion
      Once the match between a mentor and a young person is made, the work has only just begun. By identifying and addressing common pitfalls in formal mentoring relationships, programs can better support mentors and youth in their efforts to build close, enduring, and growth-promoting relationships.
    • 25
      Share RESOURCES
      MPM Training www.mentoringworks.org/traininginstitute
      Web sites & PDFs www.delicious.com/traininginstitute
      This presentation & others www.slideshare.net/traininginstitute
    • MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership
      The leader in expanding the power of mentoring to millions of young Americans who want and need adult mentors.
      Ongoing Support, Supervision and Monitoring
      Reaching Closure
      26
    • National organization that provides training and technical assistance to youth mentoring programs.
      Going the Distance—A Guide to Building Lasting Relationships in Mentoring Programs
      Overcoming Relationship Pitfalls, fact sheet
      27
    • 28
      The mission of the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota is to lead our state in building and sustaining quality mentoring for every child.
      Tools for Mentoring Adolescents: Building Trust and Attachment
    • Next Quality In Action Webinar
      October 5 –
      Navigating the Criminal Background Screening Process
      The criminal background screening process can be difficult and time- consuming for mentoring programs to navigate. In a recent survey of Minnesota mentoring programs that use a commercial background screening service, 46% said they use a commercial service because they don’t have the capacity to run their own checks. But what are you getting with a commercial screening service? What can you do to conduct more effective criminal background screenings?
      Combining feedback from mentoring programs and our own research, MPM put together two new informational overviews to help you choose internal or external screening processes that meet your program’s needs. Join this webinar to assess screening challenges and learn more about useful resources.
    • And don’t forget…
      October 24 – 12th Annual Minnesota Mentoring Conference
      Featuring keynote speakers, Dr. Renée Spencer (in person), and Dr. Jean Rhodes (via interactive video conference).
      The 2011 conference, Best in Class, features well-known experts and trainers from around the country who are highly regarded for their innovations in mentoring, and who will bring cutting edge insights on the field to mentoring staff, supporters and stakeholders.
      Save $25 on each conference registration - register now to receive the Early Bird rate of $110 valid through September 14th.
      Participants of all experience levels can expect to walk away from the conference with great ideas and practices to implement in their programs.
      For more information, visit www.mpmn.org/Events/AnnualConference.aspx