Coming Together Across Cultures: Intentional Relationship Building <br />August 3, 2011<br />Quality in Action<br />
Webinar Logistics <br />Asking Questions & Sharing Comments During the Webinar<br />“Raise your hand” & MPM Organizers wil...
Elements of Effective Practice<br />Standard: Train prospective mentors in the basic knowledge and skills needed to build ...
Our Panelist<br />Sarah Kremer<br />Program Director, Friends for Youth<br />
Coming Together Across Cultures: Intentional Relationship Building<br />Transforming lives through <br />the power of ment...
Goals<br />Highlight activities from in-person training<br />Provide resources for own trainings or workshops<br />Contrib...
Research<br />Same-race matches have not “received consistent support from studies to date”  and results are mixed<br />“S...
Research<br />Evidence “overwhelmingly in support of ‘no more than skin-deep’ hypothesis”<br />Haddad, Chen, Greenberger, ...
Research<br />Quantitative study: potential effects of social class differences<br />Factors make a difference<br />Amount...
Research: Recommendations<br />Consider role of race/ethnicity/culture <br />Do not match pairs on race/ethnicity only<br ...
Research: Recommendations<br />“…Need to be flexible and listen more closely to experiences of indigenous peoples and dive...
In-Person Training Agenda <br />Start Where You Are<br />Personal<br />Creating the Foundation<br />Self Awareness<br />Ch...
Two Truths and A Lie, Cultural Version<br /><ul><li> Name
 Agency
 Two Truths
 One Lie</li></li></ul><li>Dimensions of Diversity<br />
ACTIVITY<br />Express thoughts/feelings that arise around: culture, cultural diversity, multiculturalism, cultural compete...
Creating the Foundation<br />Tear all paper into tiny pieces and leave in pile<br />
Self Awareness: Select Pot<br />Self Assessment: Promoting Cultural Diversity and Cultural Competency from National Center...
Cultural awareness<br />Cultural Iceberg<br />Change<br />
Parts of self that are difficult to change<br />Test Yourself for Hidden Bias<br />Change (add rocks)<br />
Connecting with Others<br />Definition/understanding of mentoring (collectivism vs. individualism perspective) <br />Speci...
Obstacles in Connecting with Youth<br />Existing family dynamics/systems<br />Educational expectations<br />Languages spok...
Solutions to Obstacles<br />Work on yourself<br />Work on your program’s approach<br />Connect with other community groups...
Practice<br />Advantages of same-race matches<br />Potential to create clear pictures of positive values and role behavior...
Practice: Recommendations<br />GENDER <br />Most programs don’t cross-gender match <br />LANGUAGE <br />Most program match...
Intentional Relationship Building(plant seeds)<br />EquanimityMeditationKelly McGonigal, Ph.D.Stanford University<br />
Professional<br />Small groups of 3 or 4<br />Identify current or past challenges and successes related to culture in work...
Nurturing(add water)<br /> Commitments: Identify 1 or 2 new approaches or new thinking you agree to implement now<br />
Questions?<br />
Resources: Handouts<br /><ul><li>National Center for Cultural Competence: Self-Assessment Checklist for Personnel Providin...
Language and Culture Worldwide: The Cultural Iceberg
Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota: Tools for Mentoring Adolescents, #7: The Influence of Culture on the Mentoring Relatio...
Teaching Tolerance: Test Yourself for Hidden Bias, What’s A Teacher To Do?, Mutual Learning through Conversation
WorldBridges: EnCountering Stereotypeshttp://world-bridges.org/
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Quality in Action - August 2011: Coming Together Across Cultures

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  • Sarah Kremer is Program Director for Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute and a Board Certified Art Therapist. She received her Master’s in Art Therapy from SAIC and has worked with adolescents in mental health, probation, school, and mentoring programs. She authored the Mentoring Journal (2007), published by Friends for Youth. As Director of the Mentoring Institute and training consultant for CARS, the National Mentoring Center, and MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership, she draws upon her knowledge of adolescent development, volunteer management and screening, therapeutic treatment, art-based directives, evaluation, research, and mentoring to provide interactive workshops on Recommended Best Practices for youth mentoring.
  • POLLHave you ever attended a cultural competency training?POLLDid you feel the cultural competency training was at all useful to you?
  • QUESTIONWhat are some negative words that you can think of related to culture?What are some positive words related to culture?
  • MARIBEL:Tear paper so we can hear in the microphone.
  • MARIBEL:Read aloud a few sample questions
  • QuestionWhat would you consider cultural differences?
  • MARIBEL:Talk about visible/ invisible cultural differences
  • Mentoring models: is 1:1 culturally appropriate or relevant for mentee population?POLLDoes your program include cultural competency training for mentors?
  • QUESTIONWhat obstacles have you experienced or observed in your program?
  • When in doubt, ask mentor and mentee for input. “Does this person sound okay to you?”
  • QUESTIONWhat challenges or successes have you experienced in your work setting?
  • QUESTIONIf you’re willing to set some intentions now, what could you commit to doing differently now that you’ve participated in this webinar?
  • Learn to create an effective budget process that will get everyone involved and ensure that your budget document reflects your organization&apos;s mission, strategic plan, and programmatic priorities for the upcoming year. We will walk you through our 10-step budgeting checklist and discuss practical steps you can implement at your organization. This webinar is an introduction to budgeting and is designed for those who are leading the process for the first time or anyone looking to expand their current budgeting practices.
  • Quality in Action - August 2011: Coming Together Across Cultures

    1. 1. Coming Together Across Cultures: Intentional Relationship Building <br />August 3, 2011<br />Quality in Action<br />
    2. 2. Webinar Logistics <br />Asking Questions & Sharing Comments During the Webinar<br />“Raise your hand” & MPM Organizers will unmute you<br />Or, type questions (and comments) in the question/answer section and submit; we will respond directly to you or possibly share your question with all attendees<br />When unmuted, please monitor your background noise<br />Courtney Erickson<br />AmeriCorps Technical Assistance & Training Specialist<br />Recordings of past webinars are available on our YouTube Channel.<br />
    3. 3. Elements of Effective Practice<br />Standard: Train prospective mentors in the basic knowledge and skills needed to build an effective mentoring relationship. <br />Benchmarks<br />B.3.1 Program provides a minimum of two hours of pre-match, in-person training. <br />B.3.2 Mentor training includes the follow topics, at a minimum: program rules; mentor’s goals & expectations; mentor’s obligations & rules; relationship development & maintenance; ethical issues that may arise related to the mentoring relationship; effective closure of the mentoring relationship; sources of assistance available to support mentors. <br />Enhancements<br />E.3.3 Program addresses the following developmental topics in the training: youth development process; cultural, gender, economic issues; opportunities & challenges related to mentoring specific populations of children <br />
    4. 4. Our Panelist<br />Sarah Kremer<br />Program Director, Friends for Youth<br />
    5. 5. Coming Together Across Cultures: Intentional Relationship Building<br />Transforming lives through <br />the power of mentoring<br />Sarah E. Kremer, ATR-BC<br />Program Director<br />Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute<br />
    6. 6. Goals<br />Highlight activities from in-person training<br />Provide resources for own trainings or workshops<br />Contribute to ongoing discussion on intersection of culture and youth mentoring<br />
    7. 7. Research<br />Same-race matches have not “received consistent support from studies to date” and results are mixed<br />“Similarity in experiences and interests may be an equally or even more important matching criteria”<br />In naturally occurring mentoring relationships with urban, Latino, and African American youth, most mentors are same race/ethnicity<br />But most racial minority youth are matched with White mentors in formal programs<br />Factors to consider: Stereotype threats, cultural values (collectivism vs. individualism)<br />Sanchez & Colón, 2005<br />
    8. 8. Research<br />Evidence “overwhelmingly in support of ‘no more than skin-deep’ hypothesis”<br />Haddad, Chen, Greenberger, 2011<br />“It matters when it matters.”<br />Matching by demographic similarities under some conditions: when it is important to youth<br />Relevant to where they are<br />Important to identity<br />Working out cultural identity<br />Taking pride in cultural identity<br />Powers, 2011<br />
    9. 9. Research<br />Quantitative study: potential effects of social class differences<br />Factors make a difference<br />Amount of time in relationship<br />Level of trust<br />Same race matching<br />Good for general support and assistance<br />May matter in early phases<br />Distinctly different matching<br />Good for expanding social network, knowledge, opportunities<br />Does not have negative impact in long term<br />Social class differences have no significant effect<br />Gaddis, 2011<br />
    10. 10. Research: Recommendations<br />Consider role of race/ethnicity/culture <br />Do not match pairs on race/ethnicity only<br />Use assessments of cultural factors to target support<br />Provide cultural competency training to mentors <br />Utilize natural support systems for youth<br />Consider developing culturally specific mentoring programs<br />Sanchez & Colón, 2005<br />
    11. 11. Research: Recommendations<br />“…Need to be flexible and listen more closely to experiences of indigenous peoples and diverse populations to ensure programming is responsive to their unique needs.”<br />Marshall & Shaver, 2010<br />
    12. 12. In-Person Training Agenda <br />Start Where You Are<br />Personal<br />Creating the Foundation<br />Self Awareness<br />Change<br />Connecting with Others<br />Intentional Relationship Building<br />Professional<br />Nurturing Seeds of Diversity<br />
    13. 13. Two Truths and A Lie, Cultural Version<br /><ul><li> Name
    14. 14. Agency
    15. 15. Two Truths
    16. 16. One Lie</li></li></ul><li>Dimensions of Diversity<br />
    17. 17. ACTIVITY<br />Express thoughts/feelings that arise around: culture, cultural diversity, multiculturalism, cultural competency<br />Two people will read aloud all POSITIVE papers and all NEGATIVE papers<br />NEGATIVE<br />POSITIVE<br />
    18. 18. Creating the Foundation<br />Tear all paper into tiny pieces and leave in pile<br />
    19. 19. Self Awareness: Select Pot<br />Self Assessment: Promoting Cultural Diversity and Cultural Competency from National Center for Cultural Competence (Goode, 2009 revised)<br />Select A, B, or C for each item<br />A = Frequently or applies to great deal<br />B = Occasionally or applies moderately<br />C = Rarely/never or applies minimally/not at all<br />
    20. 20. Cultural awareness<br />Cultural Iceberg<br />Change<br />
    21. 21.
    22. 22. Parts of self that are difficult to change<br />Test Yourself for Hidden Bias<br />Change (add rocks)<br />
    23. 23. Connecting with Others<br />Definition/understanding of mentoring (collectivism vs. individualism perspective) <br />Specific tools to use with youth<br />TT: What’s a Teacher To Do<br />TT: Mutual Learning Through Conversation<br />MPM: Influence of Culture on Mentoring Relationships<br />WB: EnCountering Stereotypes<br />Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Journal: Multiple Identities<br />(add soil)<br />
    24. 24. Obstacles in Connecting with Youth<br />Existing family dynamics/systems<br />Educational expectations<br />Languages spoken<br />Level of gang involvement<br />History of trauma<br />Common stereotypes<br />
    25. 25. Solutions to Obstacles<br />Work on yourself<br />Work on your program’s approach<br />Connect with other community groups<br />Faith-based<br />Ethnic/ nationality<br />Conflict Resolution Centers<br />Know your mentees<br />Train your mentors<br />Promote being open to understanding how culture impacts other issues and situations<br />
    26. 26. Practice<br />Advantages of same-race matches<br />Potential to create clear pictures of positive values and role behaviors<br />Offer a built-in “comfort zone” that facilitates the relationship’s development<br />Mentees and their parents/guardians prefer  <br />Advantages of cross-race matches <br />Opportunity to expand world views and to break down stigmas and prejudices<br />Matching youth right away vs. waiting for specific match<br />Ask mentors, mentees and parents: <br />“Would you feel comfortable with someone who is of different race/ethnicity than you?” <br />North & Sherk, 2000<br />
    27. 27. Practice: Recommendations<br />GENDER <br />Most programs don’t cross-gender match <br />LANGUAGE <br />Most program match entors and mentees whospeak the same language <br />GEOGRAPHIC PROXIMITY <br />Ensure they live close enough to allowfrequent contact<br />MUTUAL INTERESTS <br />When possible, match by interest <br />“CHEMISTRY” <br />Program staff – as catalyst – get to know personalities involved <br />ENVIRONMENT <br />Every match is between mentee’s “total environment” andmentor’s “total environment”<br />family situation,living situation, work demands, neighborhood and community<br />North & Sherk, 2000<br />
    28. 28. Intentional Relationship Building(plant seeds)<br />EquanimityMeditationKelly McGonigal, Ph.D.Stanford University<br />
    29. 29. Professional<br />Small groups of 3 or 4<br />Identify current or past challenges and successes related to culture in work setting<br />Cultural Competence Checklist<br />Achieving Cultural Competence Guidebook<br />
    30. 30. Nurturing(add water)<br /> Commitments: Identify 1 or 2 new approaches or new thinking you agree to implement now<br />
    31. 31. Questions?<br />
    32. 32. Resources: Handouts<br /><ul><li>National Center for Cultural Competence: Self-Assessment Checklist for Personnel Providing Services and Supports to Children with Disabilities & Special Health Needs and their Families
    33. 33. Language and Culture Worldwide: The Cultural Iceberg
    34. 34. Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota: Tools for Mentoring Adolescents, #7: The Influence of Culture on the Mentoring Relationship http://www.mpmn.org/Files/TMA-7Culture2.pdf
    35. 35. Teaching Tolerance: Test Yourself for Hidden Bias, What’s A Teacher To Do?, Mutual Learning through Conversation
    36. 36. WorldBridges: EnCountering Stereotypeshttp://world-bridges.org/
    37. 37. Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute: Mentoring Journal Multiple Identities activity http://www.friendsforyouth.org/MentorJournal.html
    38. 38. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: Cultural Competence Checklist Policies and Procedures
    39. 39. US Dept HHS: Achieving Cultural Competence: Guidebook for Providers of Services to Oder Americans and their Families</li></li></ul><li>Resources: Research & Practice<br /><ul><li>Barajas, J. (2005) Mentoring Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth. Center for Applied Research Solutions. http://www.carsmentoring.org/publications/listing.php?publication_id=157
    40. 40. Gaddis, S.M. (2011). What's in a Relationship? An Examination of Social Capital, Race, and Class in Mentoring Relationships. UNC at Chapel Hill.
    41. 41. Haddad, E., Chen, C., & Greenberger, E. (2011). The Role of Important Non-Parental Adults (VIPs) in the Lives of Older Adolescents: A Comparison of Three Ethnic Groups. Journal of Youth Adolescence. 40:310-319.
    42. 42. Jucovy, L. (2002) Same-Race and Cross-Race Matching (Technical Assistance Packet #7) Public/Private Ventures and Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory/National Mentoring Center. www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/26_publication.pdf
    43. 43. Marshall, D. & Shaver, K. (2010). Culture, Context, and Innovation: A Kiwi Canuck Perspective. In Karcher, M. & Nakkula, M. (Eds.) New Directions for Youth Development: Theory, Practice, Research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
    44. 44. North, D. & Sherk, J.(2000) Creating and Sustaining A Winning Match. Center for Applied Research Solutions. http://carsmentoring.org/publications/listing.php?publication_id=152
    45. 45. Sanchez, B & Colon, Y. (2005). Race, Ethnicity, and Culture in Mentoring Relationships. In DuBois, D. & Karcher, M. (Eds.) Handbook on Youth Mentoring. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.</li></li></ul><li>Thank you!<br />www.mentoringinstitute.org<br />650-559-0200<br />http://www.facebook.com/pages/Friends-for-Youth/105093182858863<br />http://twitter.com/friendsforyouth<br />http://www.friendsforyouth.blogspot.com/<br />http://www.youtube.com/user/FriendsforYouthOrg<br />
    46. 46. Culturally Smart Relationships<br />Training from MPM for mentors on how to be smart about addressing the issue of cultural, race, socio-economic status with mentees<br />Usually added on to our Maximize Your Impact Training<br />Contact the Training Institute if you are interested in having this training delivered to your program <br />
    47. 47. Resources <br />EdChangeA collaborative effort that provides resources to encourage cultural competency in schools. <br />YWCALocally, the YWCA provides trainings and forums on addressing racism in our community. <br />Mentoring Immigrant & Refugee Youth A toolkit for programs from MENTOR. <br />
    48. 48. Other Resources<br />This presentation & otherswww.slideshare.net/traininginstitute<br />MPM Trainingwww.mpmn.org/traininginstitute<br />Web sites & PDFswww.delicious.com/traininginstitute<br />
    49. 49. Next Quality In Action Webinar<br />A mention of youth mentoring brings to mind powerful and often poignant stories of how a committed and concerned adult came along at just the right time and made all the difference in the life of a young person. But what happens when mentoring relationships do not go well? Join Dr. Renée Spencer as she reviews research on the frequency and reasons behind failed mentoring relationships, including new data from a longitudinal study she led and from a chapter she authored for the second edition of the Handbook of Youth Mentoring (not yet published). Participate in this webinar to get a sneak peek of Dr. Spencer's keynote! <br />September 6- Why Youth Mentoring Relationships End<br />Featured panelist: Dr. Renée Spencer, Associate Professor at Boston University School of Social Work <br />
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