Quality in Action Across Ages Mentoring Program  featuring Andrea Taylor, Ph.D. September 1, 2010
Webinar Logistics <ul><li>Asking Questions & Sharing Comments During the Webinar </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Raise your hand” ...
An Intergenerational  Mentoring Approach  to Drug Prevention Ages Across ©
Andrea S. Taylor, Ph.D. Across Ages Developer Director of Training The Intergenerational Center @ Temple University [email...
ACROSS AGES  <ul><li>Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (SAMHSA) </li></ul><ul><li>Across Ages Demonstration (1991-1996...
ACROSS AGES Theoretical Perspective   <ul><li>Social Development Theory (Hawkins, Lishner & Catalano, 1985)  </li></ul><ul...
Goal:  <ul><li>Increase the protective factors for high- risk students in order to prevent, reduce or delay the use of alc...
Target Population <ul><li>Original project and two replications:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>African-American, Latino, Caucasia...
Specific objectives: <ul><li>Increase the knowledge of health/substance abuse issues and foster healthy attitudes, intenti...
Risk Factors:   <ul><li>Economically disadvantaged </li></ul><ul><li>School failure </li></ul><ul><li>Problem behavior in ...
ACROSS AGES  <ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Community Service </li></ul><ul><li>Life Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluat...
<ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>1:1 /2:1 or teams; </li></ul><ul><li>2 hours per week; </li></ul><ul><li>mentors 55+; ...
‘DID YOU KNOW?’ THE FASTEST GROWING SEGMENT OF THE POPULATION ARE OLDER ADULTS    FACT :  1900  3.1  MILLION PEOPLE  65+ 1...
Why Older Adults as Mentors? <ul><li>Fastest growing segment of the population </li></ul><ul><li>More time available  and ...
COMMUNITY SERVICE © Across Ages
THE DIRECT SERVICE MODEL <ul><li>Youth work collaboratively with professionals and community members </li></ul><ul><li>You...
LIFE SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING <ul><ul><li>Social Competence Promotion for Young Adolescents (Weissberg, Caplan and Benetto, ...
When You Have a Problem <ul><li>STOP, CALM DOWN, & THINK before you act </li></ul>© Across Ages
When You Have a Problem <ul><li>Say the PROBLEM and how you FEEL </li></ul><ul><li>Set a POSITIVE GOAL </li></ul><ul><li>T...
When You Have a Problem <ul><li>GO ahead and TRY the BEST PLAN </li></ul>© Across Ages
<ul><li>Family Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly </li></ul><ul><li>Social, Recreational and Cultural Events </li></ul><...
 
Evaluation Design:  <ul><li>Classic randomized pretest/posttest with a control group design  (Campbell & Stanley, 1966)  <...
Evaluation  <ul><li>Youth surveyed at baseline and program exit. </li></ul><ul><li>Subsequent projects included follow up ...
Outcomes for youth – statistically significant at the .05 level: <ul><li>Improvement in knowledge about and reactions to d...
Outcomes for Families: <ul><li>Increased participation in school related activities </li></ul><ul><li>More positive commun...
Benefits of Participation for Older Adults   Self Report – Interviews and Focus Groups <ul><li>Increased feelings of self-...
Replication: Lessons Learned <ul><li>Organizational Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Fidelity to ...
Organizational Capacity <ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sufficient staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>physical ...
Organizational Capacity <ul><li>Management Style </li></ul><ul><ul><li>practice facilitative management </li></ul></ul><ul...
Partnerships <ul><li>Partnerships essential for recruiting </li></ul><ul><li>Cast a wide net </li></ul><ul><li>Develop MOU...
Fidelity and Community Impact <ul><li>Conduct community needs assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Assess “fit” with developer </l...
What Cannot Be Changed? <ul><li>Program components </li></ul><ul><li>Age and roles of mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Screening ...
How Can the Program Be Modified? <ul><ul><ul><li>Community Service Activities  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not...
Sustainability <ul><li>Demonstrate impact on community </li></ul><ul><li>Document and evaluate/share findings </li></ul><u...
 
Resources <ul><li>MPM Training  www.mpmn.org/traininginstitute </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites & PDFs  www.delicious.com/train...
Thank You! <ul><li>Next Quality in Action webinar is October 6, 2010; 12:00 – 1:00 pm CDT  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parental ...
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Quality in Action #8 - Across Ages Mentoring Program

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Part of monthly Quality In Action Webinar Series hosted by Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota.

September 1, 2010 - Features Andrea Taylor., Ph.D., and Developer and Principal Investigator of Across Ages, a comprehensive, intergenerational mentoring program designed to reduce adolescent drug abuse among 9 to 13 year olds. Across Ages has been designated as a Model Program by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and is the only mentoring program to receive such a designation. In addition, the Across Ages model has been recognized as a Best Practice Model in Youth Violence Prevention by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; a Top 25 Youth Development Program by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; a Commendable Practice by the Child Welfare League of America; and a Model Program - Case Study for North America by the United Nations Office of Drug Control Programs. Across Ages has been replicated in more than 30 sites in 17 states. Dr. Taylor is also the keynote presenter for the 2010 Minnesota Mentoring Conference.

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  • Transcript of "Quality in Action #8 - Across Ages Mentoring Program"

    1. 1. Quality in Action Across Ages Mentoring Program featuring Andrea Taylor, Ph.D. September 1, 2010
    2. 2. Webinar Logistics <ul><li>Asking Questions & Sharing Comments During the Webinar </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Raise your hand” & MPM Organizers will unmute you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Or, type questions (and comments) in the question/answer section and submit; we will respond directly to you or possibly share your question with all attendees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When unmuted, please monitor your background noise </li></ul></ul>April Riordan , Director of Training and Community Partnerships
    3. 3. An Intergenerational Mentoring Approach to Drug Prevention Ages Across ©
    4. 4. Andrea S. Taylor, Ph.D. Across Ages Developer Director of Training The Intergenerational Center @ Temple University [email_address] 215-204-6708
    5. 5. ACROSS AGES <ul><li>Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (SAMHSA) </li></ul><ul><li>Across Ages Demonstration (1991-1996) </li></ul><ul><li>Across ages Replication (1996-1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Project Youth Connect (1999-2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Across Ages Dissemination (2002-2005) </li></ul>© Across Ages
    6. 6. ACROSS AGES Theoretical Perspective <ul><li>Social Development Theory (Hawkins, Lishner & Catalano, 1985) </li></ul><ul><li>Social Control Theory of Delinquency (Gottfredson, D.C., 1986) </li></ul><ul><li>Work of Werner, 1984, 1992; Werner & Smith, 1982 (Resiliency) </li></ul>© Across Ages
    7. 7. Goal: <ul><li>Increase the protective factors for high- risk students in order to prevent, reduce or delay the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs and the attendant problems associated with such use. </li></ul>© Across Ages
    8. 8. Target Population <ul><li>Original project and two replications: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>African-American, Latino, Caucasian and Asian middle school students (6 th grade) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Urban setting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Subsequent replications (85+): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adapted for Native American, Caucasian, Latino and African-American youth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Urban, suburban and rural settings </li></ul></ul>© Across Ages
    9. 9. Specific objectives: <ul><li>Increase the knowledge of health/substance abuse issues and foster healthy attitudes, intentions and behavior regarding drug use among targeted youth </li></ul><ul><li>Improve school bonding, including academic performance, school attendance and behavior and attitudes toward school </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen relationships with adults and peers </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance problem-solving and decision-making skills </li></ul>© Across Ages
    10. 10. Risk Factors: <ul><li>Economically disadvantaged </li></ul><ul><li>School failure </li></ul><ul><li>Problem behavior in school </li></ul><ul><li>Few positive adult role models </li></ul><ul><li>Peer group engaged in risky behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Residence in communities with no opportunities for positive free-time activities </li></ul><ul><li>Youth in kinship care due to inability of birth parents to care for them, often due to incarceration or substance use </li></ul>© Across Ages
    11. 11. ACROSS AGES <ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>Community Service </li></ul><ul><li>Life Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation </li></ul>© Across Ages
    12. 12. <ul><li>Mentoring </li></ul><ul><li>1:1 /2:1 or teams; </li></ul><ul><li>2 hours per week; </li></ul><ul><li>mentors 55+; </li></ul><ul><li>social, recreational and cultural activities; </li></ul><ul><li>academic support </li></ul><ul><li>stipend/activity fund </li></ul>
    13. 13. ‘DID YOU KNOW?’ THE FASTEST GROWING SEGMENT OF THE POPULATION ARE OLDER ADULTS   FACT : 1900 3.1 MILLION PEOPLE 65+ 1996 33.9 MILLION PEOPLE 65+ 2030 69.4 MILLION PEOPLE 65+   AS THE POPULATION AGES WOMEN OUTLIVE MEN AT A RATE OF 2:1 (65+) AND 3:1 (85+) BETWEEN 1990 AND 2030 THE WHITE NON-LATINO POPULATION IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE BY 91%… THE LATINO POPULATION IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE BY 570%… THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN POPULATION IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE BY 159%… AMERICAN INDIAN, ESKIMOS AND ALEUTS – 294% ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDERS – 643% (Source: Administration on Aging, U.S. Bureau of the Census)   © Across Ages
    14. 14. Why Older Adults as Mentors? <ul><li>Fastest growing segment of the population </li></ul><ul><li>More time available and a different relationship to time </li></ul><ul><li>Experience from a lifetime of work and caring for family </li></ul><ul><li>Life perspective rooted in survival </li></ul><ul><li>Life stage of generativity </li></ul>© Across Ages
    15. 15. COMMUNITY SERVICE © Across Ages
    16. 16. THE DIRECT SERVICE MODEL <ul><li>Youth work collaboratively with professionals and community members </li></ul><ul><li>Youth are engaged in meaningful activities with the people they are serving </li></ul><ul><li>Experience provides opportunity for two-way exchange </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunity for structured reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Helps promote youth’s commitment to social responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Activities are NOT one time events </li></ul><ul><li>Activities are held weekly or bi-weekly for a minimum of 12 weeks. </li></ul>© Across Ages
    17. 17. LIFE SKILLS/PROBLEM SOLVING <ul><ul><li>Social Competence Promotion for Young Adolescents (Weissberg, Caplan and Benetto, 1992) </li></ul></ul>© Across Ages
    18. 18. When You Have a Problem <ul><li>STOP, CALM DOWN, & THINK before you act </li></ul>© Across Ages
    19. 19. When You Have a Problem <ul><li>Say the PROBLEM and how you FEEL </li></ul><ul><li>Set a POSITIVE GOAL </li></ul><ul><li>Think of lots of SOLUTIONS </li></ul><ul><li>Think ahead to the CONSEQUENCES </li></ul>© Across Ages
    20. 20. When You Have a Problem <ul><li>GO ahead and TRY the BEST PLAN </li></ul>© Across Ages
    21. 21. <ul><li>Family Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Monthly </li></ul><ul><li>Social, Recreational and Cultural Events </li></ul><ul><li>Parents/caregivers, siblings, mentors, youth </li></ul><ul><li>Free or low cost </li></ul>
    22. 23. Evaluation Design: <ul><li>Classic randomized pretest/posttest with a control group design (Campbell & Stanley, 1966) </li></ul><ul><li>Group MPS: Full intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Group PS: Limited intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Group C: No intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Final sample size N=589 </li></ul>© Across Ages
    23. 24. Evaluation <ul><li>Youth surveyed at baseline and program exit. </li></ul><ul><li>Subsequent projects included follow up at 6 and 12 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Process Data: Mentor Activity Logs, Interviews, Focus Groups, Staff Logs, Attendance, Satisfaction Surveys, Problem-Solving </li></ul>© Across Ages
    24. 25. Outcomes for youth – statistically significant at the .05 level: <ul><li>Improvement in knowledge about and reactions to drug use </li></ul><ul><li>Decrease in substance use (e.g. alcohol and tobacco) </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in school-related behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in attitudes toward school and the future </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in attitudes toward adults in general and older adults in particular </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in well-being </li></ul><ul><li>The level of mentor involvement was positively related to improvement on various outcome measures. </li></ul>© Across Ages
    25. 26. Outcomes for Families: <ul><li>Increased participation in school related activities </li></ul><ul><li>More positive communication with children </li></ul><ul><li>Engaged in more activities (positive) as a family </li></ul><ul><li>Gained access to community resources </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded support networks </li></ul>© Across Ages
    26. 27. Benefits of Participation for Older Adults Self Report – Interviews and Focus Groups <ul><li>Increased feelings of self-worth </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded support networks </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative problem solving </li></ul><ul><li>Increased social and volunteer activity </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in relationships with other family members </li></ul><ul><li>Decreased concern and discussion about some physical complaints </li></ul><ul><li>Unanticipated enjoyment in activities with youth </li></ul>© Across Ages
    27. 28. Replication: Lessons Learned <ul><li>Organizational Capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Fidelity to the Model/Community Impact </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability </li></ul>
    28. 29. Organizational Capacity <ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sufficient staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>physical space </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>commitment of agency resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>protocols in place for mentors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>experience working with volunteers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>staff attitudes toward older adults </li></ul></ul>
    29. 30. Organizational Capacity <ul><li>Management Style </li></ul><ul><ul><li>practice facilitative management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>treat mentors as team members </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>engage in collaborative problem-solving </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Capacity to Recruit/Retain Mentors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>partnerships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>access to sufficient number of adults 55+ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sufficient support/recognition of mentors </li></ul></ul>
    30. 31. Partnerships <ul><li>Partnerships essential for recruiting </li></ul><ul><li>Cast a wide net </li></ul><ul><li>Develop MOU </li></ul><ul><li>Involve partners in training </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain on-going connections e.g. staff meetings, feedback mechanism, opportunity for reflection/course correction </li></ul>
    31. 32. Fidelity and Community Impact <ul><li>Conduct community needs assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Assess “fit” with developer </li></ul><ul><li>Utilize Fidelity Instrument </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct training on site </li></ul><ul><li>Include community partners in training </li></ul>
    32. 33. What Cannot Be Changed? <ul><li>Program components </li></ul><ul><li>Age and roles of mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Screening and training of mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Training and orientation of all participants (youth, parents, school personnel) </li></ul><ul><li>Continuing support and recognition of mentors </li></ul><ul><li>Vigilant monitoring of the matches </li></ul><ul><li>Written agreements between collaborating organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Qualities of staff </li></ul>© Across Ages
    33. 34. How Can the Program Be Modified? <ul><ul><ul><li>Community Service Activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not necessary to conduct nursing home visits BUT Activities MUST meet criteria established by AA (on-going, providing a direct service to others, time for reflection) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Curriculum – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Another approved, evaluated curriculum can be used) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Target Population </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Understand what is culturally and age appropriate </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Setting – </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can be adapted to non-urban settings; not always effective in very rural settings </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>© Across Ages
    34. 35. Sustainability <ul><li>Demonstrate impact on community </li></ul><ul><li>Document and evaluate/share findings </li></ul><ul><li>Promote community ownership </li></ul><ul><li>Diversify funding </li></ul><ul><li>Include funders/partners in training and other activities </li></ul><ul><li>Produce materials, products, presentations, publications-saturate your market </li></ul>
    35. 37. Resources <ul><li>MPM Training www.mpmn.org/traininginstitute </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites & PDFs www.delicious.com/traininginstitute </li></ul><ul><li>This presentation & others www.slideshare.net/traininginstitute </li></ul>
    36. 38. Thank You! <ul><li>Next Quality in Action webinar is October 6, 2010; 12:00 – 1:00 pm CDT </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parental Involvement in Mentoring  Features panelist Andrea Taylor, Ph.D. </li></ul></ul>

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