Quality in Action #5 - K12 Journey Map & Impact of Mentoring on Academic Outcomes
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Quality in Action #5 - K12 Journey Map & Impact of Mentoring on Academic Outcomes

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Features MPM's K-12 Journey Map and a discussion of mentoring's impact on youth academic outcomes. Quality In Action webinar, hosted monthly by Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. June 2, 2010.

Features MPM's K-12 Journey Map and a discussion of mentoring's impact on youth academic outcomes. Quality In Action webinar, hosted monthly by Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota. June 2, 2010.

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  • http://www.huffingtonpost.com/audrey-kuo/joining-the-fight-against_b_589221.html
  • http://www.sagepub.com/booksProdDesc.nav?prodId=Book226176#tabview=related
  • Page 443-445 in the Handbook Youth Mentoring According to the model, the degree to which a mentoirng intervention positively impacts school adjustment and academic achievement of AARS depends on improvements in feelings of competence, relatedness and autonomy in connection with the mentor. (p. 443… goes on to define C, R and A)
  • Page 445 – Opportunities to Improve Cognitive and Emotional Development
  • Page 446 Opportunities to Change and learn New Behavioral Strategies
  • Page 447 - Optimal Context for mentoring
  • Page 447 - Optimal Context for mentoring
  • Page 447 - Optimal Context for mentoring More positive effects when relationship style is opposite to that of the AARS; mentors more effective when presenting a challenging relational stance
  • http://www.rhodeslab.org/files/agents.pdf
  • The Big Brothers Big Sisters SBM (BBBS SBM) Impact Study (Herrera et al., 2007) This study, conducted by Public/Private Ventures, involved ten BBBS agencies nationwide and 1,139 youth in 4th through 9th grades, attending 71 different schools. About 80 percent of the youth received free or reduced-price lunch and/or lived in a single parent home; and 77 percent were having difficulties in at least one of four areas of risk assessed (i.e., academic performance, school behavior, relationships, and youth-reported misconduct). After the first school year of program involvement, during which youth received an average of about five months of weekly mentoring, teachers reported that participating youth improved more than their non-mentored peers in several aspects of their school performance and behavior (e.g., overall performance, quality and number of assignments turned in, skipping school, serious school infractions). Participating youth also felt more confident in their scholastic abilities. The size of these benefits was modest, although almost identical to that reported for the BBBS CBM program (Tierney, Grossman, & Resch, 1995). However, BBBS SBM benefited youth in only school-related outcomes; whereas BBBS CBM affected a much broader set of outcomes, including initiation of drug and alcohol use, and parent relationships. Yet, unlike the BBBS CBM study, the BBBS SBM evaluation included a six-month follow up assessment to test the durability of these changes. Similar to those few studies that have included an additional follow-up beyond the typical program dosage (e.g., Aseltine, Dupre & Lamlein, 2000), most of these SBM outcomes were not sustained into the first half of the second school year of the study, when about half of the youth were no longer receiving mentoring.
  • The Communities In Schools (CIS) Study of Mentoring In the Learning Environment (SMILE) Impact Study (Karcher, 2007b) In this study, the effect of providing youth SBM, in addition to other school-based support services, was examined with a sample of 516 predominately Latino(a) students in grades 5 through 12 attending 19 schools. Participants in the multi-component intervention run by Communities in Schools of San Antonio were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (1) supportive services alone; or (2) supportive services plus SBM. Therefore, unlike the BBBS SBM study described above, the CIS SMILE study examined the “additive” effect of providing a school-based mentor to youth who were already receiving other services, such as tutoring, group counseling, and enrichment activities. The duration of the SBM relationships in the CIS SMILE study were brief (typically eight meetings across three months), partly because the agency experienced barriers to retaining mentors. Relative to those youth who were not mentored, youth who were randomly assigned to receive a mentor improved in their self-reported connectedness to peers, self-esteem (global and present-oriented), and social support from friends. Other studies also have noted improvements in peer relationships (Curtis & Hansen-Schwoebel, 1999; Herrera, 2004; King, Vidourek, Davis & McClellan, 2002) as well as in attitudes toward or about oneself (Curtis & Hansen-Schwoebel, 1999; Karcher, 2005c; Portwood et al., 2005; King et al., 2002). The SMILE study did not find impacts in several other areas, including grades and attendance. The size of the program effects in this study also were small.

Quality in Action #5 - K12 Journey Map & Impact of Mentoring on Academic Outcomes Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Quality in Action K-12 Journey Map & the Impact of Mentoring on Academic Outcomes June 2, 2010 Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota
  • 2. Webinar Logistics
    • Questions
      • “ Raise your hand” & we will unmute you
      • Or, type questions and submit to us; we will respond directly to you or, if applicable, read question aloud to all participants
      • When unmuted, please monitor your background noise
  • 3. Overview
    • Impact of Mentoring on Academic Outcomes
    • K-12 Journey Map
        • Background
        • How to Use the Journey Map
        • Response & Next Steps
    • Conclusion/Summary
  • 4. Panelists Mai- Anh Kapanke , Vice President of Marketing & Public Policy Mindy Twetten , AmeriCorps Marketing & Communications Specialist April Riordan , Director of Training and Community Partnerships
  • 5.
    • Restore America’s Leadership in Higher Education
    • President Obama is committed to ensuring that America will regain its lost ground and have the highest proportion of students graduating from college in the world by 2020. The President believes that regardless of educational path after high school, all Americans should be prepared to enroll in at least one year of higher education or job training to better prepare our workforce for a 21st century economy.
  • 6.
    • As an AmeriCorps volunteer through City Year, I serve at John Liechty Middle School in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles, providing in-class academic support to 34 sixth-grade students. If the prevailing research is accurate, nine of those 12-year-olds are already on track to drop out of high school.
    • A study led by Dr. Robert Balfanz through Johns Hopkins University found that by the sixth grade, students who show any of three "early-warning indicators" -- low attendance, behavior problems or course failure in math or English -- have only a 20 percent chance of graduating.
            Audrey Kuo First-year City Year corps member Posted: May 25, 2010 03:49 PM
  • 7. Impact on Academic Outcomes
    • Academically at-Risk Students (AARS)
    • Agents of Change: Pathways through Which Mentoring Relationships Influence Adolescents’ Academic Adjustment
    • School-based mentoring studies
    • US Dept. of Education Student Mentoring Program
  • 8. Academically at-Risk Students (AARS)
    • Characteristics of AARS
    • Models of Mentoring
    • Three major hypotheses
    Handbook of Youth Mentoring , David L. DuBois and Michael J. Karcher, 2002; Academically at-Risk Students , Chapter 29; Simon Larose and George M. Tarabulsy
  • 9. The Mentoring Sociomotivational Model Structure Involvement Competence Relatedness Autonomy -Seeking Help -Time Management -Examination Preparation -Attention in Class -Coping With Transitions Adjustment, Achievement and Persistence Characteristics of Proteges, Mentors, and Context Autonomy Support Characteristics of Mentoring Interventions Students’ Cognitive and Emotional Processes Students’ School Behavior Processes Academic Outcomes
  • 10. AARS – Three major hypotheses Mentoring relationships improve attitudes toward school, academic confidence, self-concept, attitudes toward helping, feelings of school connectedness, representations of parental and teacher relationships, and perceptions of support from significant adults outside mentoring relationships. 1. Mentoring should lead to improved cognitive and socioemotional development
  • 11. AARS – Three major hypotheses Participation in mentoring relationships is linked to higher attendance in class (but not sufficient to neutralize academic risk), fewer voluntary absences from school, lower aggressiveness, greater levels of social competence, greater vocational skills, greater participation in college preparatory activities and an overall greater likelihood of taking part in higher education. Also, greater rule compliance and ability to complete schoolwork 2. Mentoring process provides students with the opportunity to change and learn new behavioral strategies
  • 12. AARS – Three major hypotheses Stronger effects for mentoring when AARS had more favorable life circumstances and better social and psychological functioning at the onset. Stronger impacts of mentoring for youth with initially low or moderate achievement levels. More positive effects on AARS adjustment for programs when mentors have backgrounds in helping professions. 3. Effects of mentoring on AARS personal and academic development are modulated by both internal and external factors (characteristics of AARS and of mentors; context of program)
  • 13. AARS – Three major hypotheses Stronger effects for mentoring when AARS had more favorable life circumstances and better social and psychological functioning at the onset. Stronger impacts of mentoring for youth with initially low or moderate achievement levels. More positive effects on AARS adjustment for programs when mentors have backgrounds in helping professions. 3. Effects of mentoring on AARS personal and academic development are modulated by both internal and external factors (characteristics of AARS and of mentors; context of program)
  • 14. AARS – Three major hypotheses Mentors’ efficacy beliefs, motivations for self-enhancement, income and marital status all can predict positive benefits/outcomes Mentors with interests in common with proteges more efficient in establishing close relationships and initiating significant intervention. Contextual characteristics like ongoing structured training for mentors, monitoring, involvement of parents may play role in effectiveness. Also duration, dosage, and mentor approach. 3. Effects of mentoring on AARS personal and academic development are modulated by both internal and external factors (characteristics of AARS and of mentors; context of program)
  • 15. Agents of Change: Pathways through Which Mentoring Relationships Influence Adolescents’ Academic Adjustment
    • Mentoring has a positive impact on grades and other academic indicators by improving the relationship between the youth and the parent and by boosting the youth’s perception of his or her academic abilities. (Rhodes, Grossman, and Resch, 2000)
    • *This study is cited in Handbook of Youth Mentoring Chapter
  • 16. Big Brothers Big Sisters SBM Impact Study (Herrera et al., 2007)
    • Involved 10 BBBS agencies & 1139 youth in grades 4-9
    • 80% free or reduced lunch; single parent home
    • 77% having difficulties in 1 of 4 risk areas
    • Average of 5 months weekly mentoring
    • Mentored youth improved more than non-mentored peers in aspects of school performance and behavior
    • More confident in scholastic abilities
    • Size of benefits same as BBBS CBM program – but only in school-related outcomes
  • 17. CIS SMILE Impact Study (Karcher, 2007b)
    • 516 predominantly Latino(a) students in grades 5-12
    • Randomly assigned to supportive services plus SBM
    • Duration of relationships was brief
    • Self-reported connectedness to peers & self-esteem improved
    • Did not find impacts in other areas, including grades & attendance
    • Size of program effects small
  • 18. Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Dept. of Ed. Student Mentoring Program
    • 32 SBM programs with 2,573 students in grades 4-8
    • Randomly assigned to treatment or control group
    • Average length of relationship was 5.8 months
    • The Student Mentoring Program did not lead to statistically significant impacts on students in any of the three outcome domains*
    • (1) academic achievement and engagement; (2) interpersonal relationships and personal responsibility; (3) high-risk or delinquent behavior
  • 19. K-12 Journey Map
    • Background
    • Wired for 2020
    http://wiredfor2020.com/map-your-future
  • 20.
    • If we believe that every student deserves to earn a diploma, we can work together to push our students and the United States back on track and resolve the high school dropout crisis.
    • The word "crisis," as its most often used, describes an unstable situation likely to have a highly unfavorable outcome. Its primary definition, however, is more neutral; the Greek word for decision, krisis, refers to a turning point - for better or worse.
    • We must make this moment a turning point for positive change. I am asking for your help to make sure that in six years, all 34 of my students will walk across a stage to receive a diploma.
            Audrey Kuo First-year City Year corps member Posted: May 25, 2010 03:49 PM
  • 21. Resources
    • KnowHow2GO KnowHow2GO is a national college access campaign that encourages low-income and first-generation students in grades 8-10 to actively prepare for college. Includes a section of resources specifically for mentors.
    • College and Career Planning Curriculum for Students, Families and their Mentors Blue Ribbon Mentor-Advocate, Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools .
  • 22. Resources
    • Realizing the College Dream . Few things are more frustrating than watching bright students with endless potential rule out college because they think it's too expensive or a waste of time. Realizing the College Dream can help you reach those students and show them that college is one opportunity they can’t afford to miss.
  • 23. Annexstad Family Foundation Scholarship Program
    • Through their vision and generosity, the Annexstads established the Annexstad Family Foundation to provide college scholarships to deserving students who have been mentored by the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization. Working closely with participating colleges and universities, the foundation makes possible a renewable scholarship program that helps cover the necessary expenses of a four-year undergraduate degree.
  • 24. Resources (Minnesota Based)
    • MyGrowthPlan.org
    • A nonprofit growth planning service that trains and supports @risk and other 8th grade, high school, and college students in learning the art, skill, and power of growth planning that helps them succeed in school and in their whole life.
    • College & Career Initiative works with community members, families and schools to ensure that all Minneapolis Public School students have a chance to explore the multitude of opportunities that life offers.
  • 25. Resources
    • MPM Training www.mpmn.org/traininginstitute
    • Web sites & PDFs www.delicious.com/traininginstitute
    • This presentation & others www.slideshare.net/traininginstitute
  • 26. Thank You!
    • Next Quality in Action webinar is July 7, 2010; 12:00 – 1:00 pm CDT
      • Shining a Light on Supervision  Features panelists Jenny Wright Collins & Matt Kjorstad of the Minneapolis Beacons Network.