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Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
Quality in action #4
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Quality in action #4

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Quality In Action webinar, May 5, 2010, featuring panelists Renee Spencer and Belle Liang. Presented by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota.

Quality In Action webinar, May 5, 2010, featuring panelists Renee Spencer and Belle Liang. Presented by the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota.

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  • Should the reference be on page 4 or 5?
  • Renee and Belle – who wrote this line?!  Applies to mentors, and to mentoring programs Board of Directors should read this article
  • This seems virtually paradoxical when considering the substantial increase of youth-adult matches in the past couple of decades (MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership, 2006) . Few guidelines existed and were ambiguous about definite ethical responsibilities or obligations of adult mentors. Implementation of volunteer training across programs is inconsistent. Programs, in response to the increased need for mentors, have reduced their minimum requirements in screening, commitment and training. Nearly ½ of relationships terminate prematurely (Rhodes, 2002) . Early terminations and failed relationships can lead to negative emotional, behavioral and academic outcomes (Downey, Lebolt, Rincon, & Freitas, 1998) .
  • [b uh -nef- uh -s uh ns] Mentors’ primary responsibility Take positive action to promote the welfare of youth and refrain from any action that may cause harm. A match’s success is frequently contingent upon the cooperation between mentors and family members
  • Responsive to his/her commitment for meeting the program’s required frequency and match duration Associated with more positive youth outcomes Youth report trust-building characteristics include honesty, keeping promises and relationship longevity (Liang, Spencer, Brogan, & Corral, 2008) . As many as ½ of volunteer mentoring relationships end early and more often at the mentor’s request (Rhodes, 2002) . Prematch training on the effects of early terminations is vital (Spencer, 2007) . Early termination can lead to a decline in youth functioning (Grossman & Rhodes, 2002; Herrera et al., 2007; Karcher, 2005; Slicker & Palmer, 1993) .
  • Mentors are expected to be understanding and candid about commitments to the relationship and avoid setting up false expectations. Emphasize the importance of the mentors’ commitment and that: A prot égé may place great meaning on plans and events Absences and tardiness May become misunderstandings  resentment, hurt Affects youth, mentor and parents
  • HOW DO PROGRAMS DECIDE THAT KIDS NEED MENTORS? Are these decision and criteria value-laden and inherently prejudicial? Unacknowledged prejudices can subtly affect interpersonal relationships (Cohen & Steele, 2002). Calls for mentors to exercise good judgment and ensure potential biases do not lead to prejudicial treatment of their protégé. Prematch training and ongoing supervision is critical: To avoid assumptions being made about mentees’ that are based on, or insensitive to, the young person’s social class, gender or disabilities. Programs are expected to provide training in cultural competence and gender sensitivity so as to raise volunteers’ attention to their own prejudices and blind spots (Liang & Grossman, 2007; Sanchez & Colon, 2005).
  • Mentors are obligated to report any suspicions that their protégé is being or has been subject to abuse and/or neglect. They should: Mentors can function as sounding boards; structuring the relationship as one place to share private thoughts and feelings (Spencer, Jordan, & Sazama, 2004). Inform protégés of their obligation to breach confidentiality should the protégé disclose that s/he intends to harm self or others. Training should be provided on confidentiality issues. Decisions regarding such matters should be made in consultation with mentoring program staff.
  • Programs have an obligation to sensitize volunteer mentors to ethical issues: that can arise when working with unrelated youth and to offer guidelines on how to promote children’s positive development can be prompted to think how their actions may affect their relationship and the protégés’ welfare. If sensitized to issues from the beginning of the relationship, mentors: will be more likely to frame their dilemma using ethics lens when facing dilemmas (Kitchner, 1986) . can be prompted to think how their actions may affect their relationship and the protégés’ welfare. Mentors must be willing to accept ambiguity as they determine the best course of action. Comprehensive prematch and ongoing training Considers developmental, gender and cultural issues Could ensure more effective relationship development
  • Transcript

    • 1. Quality in Action First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships May 5, 2010 Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota
    • 2. Welcome April Riordan Director of Training & Community Partnerships [email_address] (612) 370-9148
    • 3. Webinar Logistics
      • Questions
        • “ Raise your hand” & we will unmute you
        • Or, type questions and submit to us; we will respond directly to you or, if applicable, read question aloud to all participants
        • When unmuted, please monitor your background noise
    • 4. Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
      • Belle Liang, Ph.D, an associate professor of counseling psychology in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College
      • Renée Spencer, Ed.D., LICSW, an associate professor in the School of Social Work at Boston University
    • 5. Overview
      • Introduction
      • Ethical Principles for Youth Mentoring Relationships
          • Background
          • The 5 Ethical Principles
      • Conclusion
      First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles of Youth Mentoring Relationships. Authors: Jean Rhodes, Belle Liang and Renèe Spencer in Professional Psychology: Research and Practice of 2009, vol. 40, issue 5, pp. 452-458 .
    • 6.
      • Good intentions alone are not enough
    • 7. Introduction
      • Ethical challenges within mentoring relationships have been given little attention by the mentoring field.
      • Nearly ½ of relationships terminate prematurely (Rhodes, 2002).
      • Volunteer training can affect match effectiveness, retention, relationship quality and youth outcomes (DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, & Cooper, 2002; DuBois & Neville, 1997; Karcher, Nakkula, & Harris, 2005).
    • 8. Five Guiding Principles
        •  Promote Welfare and Safety of Young Person
        •  Be Trustworthy and Responsible
        •  Act with Integrity
        •  Promote Justice for Young People
        •  Respect the Young Person’s Rights and Dignity
      ** APA’s Code of Ethics (2002). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct. Washington, DC: Author.
    • 9. Promote the Welfare and Safety of the Young Person
      • First Do No Harm
        • Beneficence - Behavior that benefits the good of another and that helps them to avoid harm.
      • If volunteers lack skills, knowledge or sound judgment, complications can and do arise.
      • Harm can arise from either:
          • a) Misuse of power
          • b) Inappropriate boundaries
      Grossman & Rhodes, 2002; Kalbfleisch, 1997 I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after. --Ernest Hemingway 1932
    • 10. Be Trustworthy and Responsible
      • Fidelity - Keeping promises and behaving in a trustworthy manner (Strom-Gottfried, 2008, p. 21)
        • Meeting frequency and match duration
      • Trust is a keystone of effective mentoring relationships (Sipe, 1996)
    • 11.
      • Premature endings can lead to decrements in youth functioning
      • (Grossman & Rhodes, 2002; Herrera et al., 2007; Karcher, 2005; Slicker & Palmer, 1993)
      • Mentors enter with unrealistic expectations
      • Mentors feel shame at failure to connect
      Be Trustworthy and Responsible
    • 12.
      • Mentors are expected to be intentional and candid about commitments to the relationship and avoid setting up false expectations.
      • Mentors should be expected to bear the greater responsibility for:
        • maintaining consistency,
        • honoring commitments, and
        • seek program staff support
      Act with Integrity
    • 13. Promote Justice for Young People
      • Avoid prejudicial treatment
      • Differences in cultural backgrounds and values may lead volunteers to hold or unwittingly act on cultural biases
      • Prematch training and ongoing supervision are vital
      • Mentoring has potential to promote social change
      Largest proportion of volunteer mentors are white, middle-class students and professionals (MENTOR, 2006)
    • 14. Respect the Young Person’s Rights and Dignity Beauchamp & Childress, 2008
    • 15.
      • Confidentiality
      • Training should be provided on issues surrounding confidentiality.
        • Mentors should inform their protégés of their obligation to breach confidentiality should the protégé disclose that s/he intends to harm his or herself or others.
        • Decisions should be made in consultation with mentoring program staff that involve such disclosure.
      Respect the Young Person’s Rights and Dignity
    • 16. Connections to Quality
      • How are these ethical principles tied to the movement towards best practices and standards for youth mentoring?
    • 17. Who is responsible?
      • What is the role of program staff in promoting ethical principles?
      • Parents?
      • Funders?
    • 18. Conclusions
      • Programs have an obligation to sensitize volunteer mentors to ethical issues.
      • Comprehensive prematch and ongoing training can promote more effective relationship development, helping mentors to:
        • better understand and relate to protégés of diverse backgrounds
        • avoid ethical violations
        • create more positive outcomes
    • 19. Resources
      • First Do No Harm: Ethical Principles of Youth
      • Mentoring Relationships . Authors: Jean Rhodes, Belle Liang and Renée Spencer. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice of 2009, vol. 40 , issue 5, pp. 452-458.
    • 20. Resources
      • MPM Training www.mpmn.org/traininginstitute
      • Web sites & PDFs www.delicious.com/traininginstitute
      • This presentation & others www.slideshare.net/traininginstitute
    • 21. Thank You!
      • Next Quality in Action webinar is June 2, 2010; 12:00 – 1:00 pm CDT
        • Features  MPM's K-12 Journey Map and a discussion of mentoring's impact on youth academic outcomes.

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