Cropping the Big Picture: What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program
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Cropping the Big Picture: What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program

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January 19, 2012 - 1/12 in 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series ...

January 19, 2012 - 1/12 in 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Webinar Series

Featured panelists:
David DuBois, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago &
Tom Keller, Ph.D., Portland State University

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Cropping the Big Picture: What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program Cropping the Big Picture: What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program Presentation Transcript

  • Cropping the Big PictureDetermining What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program Collaboration of Education Northwest/NationalMentoring Center, Friends for Youth, MentoringPartnership of Minnesota, and Oregon Mentors January 2012
  • Research Practice Innovation Michael Garringer Resource Advisor & Forums 2012 Collaborative Mentoring Administrator Webinar Series Education NorthwestDate: Third Thursday of every month. Celeste Janssen Program DirectorTime: 10-11:15am Pacific/11am- Oregon Mentors12:15pm Mountain/12-1:15 pmCentral/1-2:15pm Eastern Sarah Kremer Program DirectorCost: Free Friends for Youth’s Mentoring Institute April Riordan Director of Training & Partnerships Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota 1
  • Participate in Today’s Webinar• All attendees muted for best sound• Type questions and comments in the question box• “Raise your hand” to ask question live during webinar 2
  • Good to Know…All attendees will receive an email after the webinarthat will include: Link to presentation slides Link to an online recording of webinar Resources Contact informationPlease help us by taking the time to complete ashort 5-question survey as you exit the webinar. 3
  • PanelistsDavid DuBois, PhD Tom Keller, PhD 4
  • What We Learned in 2002  Average youth in a program experience only a “modest or small benefit”  Effects are “enhanced significantly” whenAmerican Journal of Community more best-practicesPsychology, Vol. 30, No. 2, April 2002 are utilized 5
  • What Do We Know Now?Psychological Science in the PublicInterest,12, 57-91 6
  • When and How AreMentoring Relationships for Youth Beneficial? 7
  • What Factors Influence Mentoring Program Effectiveness? 8
  • Good News Bad News New NewsMentoring works in many No evidence of Targeting “at risk”areas improved effectiveness youth (exception: over prior generation of populations high on programs both individual andPrograms often have environmental risk)positive impacts in two ormore outcome domains Too few studies to Matching youth and evaluate impacts on mentors based onEffect of mentoring is right several key outcomes similarity of interestsin line with other youth (e.g., school drop-interventions out, juvenile offending) Utilizing mentors with educational/occupatioMentoring works at both Same largely true for nal backgrounds thatpreventing declines in youth longer-term, “follow-up” effects are a good fit with program goalsoutcomes and promotingimprovements Supporting mentors in adopting teaching andMentoring is a broad and advocacy rolesflexible strategy 9
  • Next WebinarFebruary 16 - Tips for Mentoring High-RiskYouth Featuring Dr. Roger Jarjoura, Assistant Professor in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs - IUPUI. Dr. Jarjoura is the founder of AIM, a mentoring program for incarcerated youth making the transition from corrections to community. 10
  • Before we go…All attendees will receive anemail after the webinar that willinclude: Link to presentation slides Link to an online recording of webinar Resources Contact informationPlease help us by taking the timeto complete a short 5-questionsurvey as you exit the webinar. 11
  • Thank you! Collaboration of Education Northwest/NationalMentoring Center, Friends for Youth, MentoringPartnership of Minnesota, and Oregon Mentors Michael Garringer, michael.garringer@educationnorthwest.org Celeste Janssen, celeste@oregonmentors.org Sarah Kremer, sarah@friendsforyouth.org April Riordan, april@mpmn.org
  • Comparison of Mean Post-Treatment Effect Sizes for Mentoring Programs in the CurrentMeta-Analysis to Effect Sizes Reported in Other Meta-Analyses of School- andCommunity-Based Interventions for Children and Adolescents Type of outcome Current Other meta-analyses Attitudinal/Motivational 0.19 0.23r, 0.25b Social/Relational 0.17 0.15a, 0.17i, 0.24r, 0.29b, 0.39g Psychological/Emotional 0.15 0.10a, 0.17p, 0.19d, 0.24r, 0.37b Conduct problems 0.21 0.02j, 0.07k, 0.14h, 0.15s, 0.21a, 0.21e, 0.22r, 0.30b, 0.30c, 0.41l Academic/School 0.21 0.11a, 0.23n, 0.27r School attendance 0.19 0.14b Grades 0.24 0.22b Achievement test scores 0.18 0.11a, 0.20b, 0.24f, 0.30c Physical health 0.06 0.08m, 0.17t, 0.29q, 0.41o
  • Evidence-based Practice 14
  • Effect Size Guidelines 15