2010 Minnesota Mentoring Conference - Keynote Presentation

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The Minnesota Mentoring Conference is the region's only annual conference focused exclusively on supporting quality mentoring. This year's theme was "Quality in Action," featuring keynote speaker Andrea Taylor, Ph.D.

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  • Just a note about the font – I tested it out on several people and they all preferred Arial… and didn’t think it took anything away from the storybook slides.
    Content note – will you make connections to stages of the mentoring relationship and about the mentor (Charlotte’s) approach to the mentee (Wilbur)? She is a good example I think of balancing relational and goal-oriented approaches.
  • Could you say “What does this mean for program developers and program staff?” and just have the visual that shows the path between research and practice… also introducing the hiking theme. 
  • Would like to break this into 4 slides – slide 27 with a screen shot of the QMAP, slide 28 with an example of a logic model as an image; slide 29 with a photo of volunteers or mentor/mentee; and slide 4 with MPM and MENTOR logos.
  • Would like to break this into 4 slides – slide 27 with a screen shot of the QMAP, slide 28 with an example of a logic model as an image; slide 29 with a photo of volunteers or mentor/mentee; and slide 4 with MPM and MENTOR logos.
  • Would like to break this into 4 slides – slide 27 with a screen shot of the QMAP, slide 28 with an example of a logic model as an image; slide 29 with a photo of volunteers or mentor/mentee; and slide 4 with MPM and MENTOR logos.
  • Would like to break this into 4 slides – slide 27 with a screen shot of the QMAP, slide 28 with an example of a logic model as an image; slide 29 with a photo of volunteers or mentor/mentee; and slide 4 with MPM and MENTOR logos.
  • 2010 Minnesota Mentoring Conference - Keynote Presentation

    1. 1. The Road from Research to Practice Andrea S. Taylor, Ph.D. Temple University The Intergenerational Center
    2. 2. qual·i·ty   1. That which defines something or makes it what it is 2. Degree of excellence (Dictionary: Macmillan p.786)
    3. 3. Why Does Quality Matter? Greater academic achievement, school engagement, school adjustment and positive view of the future (Rhodes, Spencer, Keller, Liang & Noam, 2006; Taylor, LoSciuto, sonkowsky & 1999)
    4. 4. Why Does Quality Matter? Improved relationships with parents (Tierney et. al. 1995)
    5. 5. Why Does Quality Matter? Increased frequency of appropriate interaction with peers (Grossman and Gary, 1997)
    6. 6. Why Does Quality Matter? Improved problem-solving skills (Taylor et.al.1999)
    7. 7. Why Does Quality Matter? Reduced substance use/abuse (Aseltine et.al. 2000; LoSciuto et.al. 1996; Tierney et.al. 1995)
    8. 8. Why Does Quality Matter? Overall reduction in risk-taking behavior (Beier,et.al. 2000)
    9. 9. Why Does Quality Matter? Presence of a mentor most important asset for positive youth development that exists in communities (Theokas & Lerner, 2006; Larson, 2006)
    10. 10. By E.B. White(1952). Harper & Brothers. New York Illustrations by Garth Williams
    11. 11. A youth in need
    12. 12. Wilbur meets his new friend and mentor
    13. 13. Wilbur wants to be like his mentor . HIS “ah ha” moment
    14. 14. Mentees respond to the image we have of them. “Actually”, said Wilbur, “I FEEL radiant”.
    15. 15. The Reward
    16. 16. Mentoring as Social Policy Gary Walker: Public/Private Ventures 2007 • There is evidence (as cited) that mentoring is an effective strategy for improving the lives, behavior and performance of many youth; • There is considerable skepticism about the effectiveness of other types of programming for youth , particularly those for adolescents; and • Mentoring is a direct response to the overall reduction of adults in the lives of youth.
    17. 17. Mentoring as Social Policy: The Challenges • The “Zero-Sum” Game • The Limits of Scale • Quality Control • Mentoring is not a panacea for all youth • Mentoring alone may not be enough
    18. 18. A Cautionary Tale : It’s not just “any mentoring”” Recruiting strategies for both mentors and mentees must be based on realistic expectations (Spencer, 2007) Matching based on mentor’s skills, interpersonal skills and common interests with youth are important considerations (Spencer, 2006) Elements of Effective Practice: 3rd Edition MENTOR (2009) Mentor screening practices have implications for safety and match duration (DuBois & Neville, 1997) Mentors receiving pre- match training reported higher levels of confidence, efficacy and closeness to their mentees and were more likely to continue for a second year (Herrera , 2007)
    19. 19. RESEARCH PRACTICE
    20. 20. The road from research to practice doesn’t need to look like this…
    21. 21. It can look more like this…
    22. 22. Tools to Help Guide the Course
    23. 23. Two Questions Why invest the time? What are the challenges?
    24. 24. Why Invest the Time?
    25. 25. © AcrossAges Case Study ACROSS AGES: An Intergenerational Mentoring Approach to Drug Prevention Demonstration – Replication – Dissemination
    26. 26. ACROSS AGES • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (SAMHSA) • Across Ages Demonstration (1991-1996) • Across ages Replication (1996-1998) • Project Youth Connect (1999-2002) • Across Ages Dissemination (2002-2005) © AcrossAges 85 Replications across the U.S.
    27. 27. Replication: Lessons Learned • Organizational Capacity • Partnerships • Fidelity to Model/Community Impact • Sustainability © AcrossAges
    28. 28. Time Money What are the Challenges? Staff Others?
    29. 29. How Can We Address the Challenges? Map Your Program - Identify Strengths and Gaps.
    30. 30. How Can We Address the Challenges? Create a Logic Model
    31. 31. How Can We Address the Challenges? Engage new or existing volunteers in capacity building roles.
    32. 32. How Can We Address the Challenges? Utilize existing resources and tools.

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